Intangible heritage

Georgian Polyphonic Singing, "Chakrulo". ©UNESCO 2008
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Georgian Polyphonic Singing, "Chakrulo"

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Summary/Historical Context

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Oral traditions
Traditional music

Popular singing has a highly valued place in Georgian culture. Polyphonic singing, in the Georgian language, is a secular tradition in a country whose language and culture have often been oppressed by invaders. There are three types of polyphony in Georgia: complex polyphony, which is common in Svaneti; polyphonic dialogue over a bass background, prevalent in the Kakheti region in Eastern Georgia; and contrasted polyphony with three partially improvised sung parts, characteristic of western Georgia. The Chakrulo song, which is sung at ceremonies and festivals and belongs to the first category, is distinguished by its use of metaphor and its yodel, the krimanchuli and a “cockerel's crow”, performed by a male falsetto singer. Some of these songs are linked to the cult of the grapevine and many date back to the eighth century

on this subject: Nomination file/ Dossier de candidature

Place/country: Georgia,
Series: 2008 Inscriptions on the Representative List/Inscriptions 2008 sur la liste représentative
Type: Documentary
Published in: 2008

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