Culture

Subject:
Natural sites

Papahãnaumokuãkea. ©UNESCO 2011
Papahãnaumokuãkea

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Language(s): English

Summary/Historical Context

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Tides of time

Papahānaumokuākea is a vast and isolated linear cluster of small, low lying islands and atolls, with their surrounding ocean, roughly 250 km to the northwest of the main Hawaiian Archipelago and extending over some 1931 km. The area has deep cosmological and traditional significance for living Native Hawaiian culture, as an ancestral environment, as an embodiment of the Hawaiian concept of kinship between people and the natural world, and as the place where it is believed that life originates and to where the spirits return after death. On two of the islands, Nihoa and Makumanamana, there are archaeological remains relating to pre-European settlement and use. Much of the monument is made up of pelagic and deep water habitats, with notable features such as sea mounts and submerged banks, extensive coral reefs and lagoons. It is one of the largest marine protected areas (MPAs) in the world



This video is part of the DVD "Tides of Time, 2011. The crown jewels of the ocean", and it is published as part of the innovative multimedia campaign launched in 2008 by UNESCO, Jaeger-LeCoultre and the International Herald Tribune.

 available here


on this subject: World Heritage List

Type: Documentary
Duration:
Credits: Manoel de Oliveira (director), Jaeger-LeCoultre (publisher), International Herald Tribune (publisher), UNESCO WHC (producer).
Published in: 2011
Library catalogue (UNESDOC): 219553

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