link to www.unesco.org 14k GIF animation conference logo

5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
ON ADULT EDUCATION

14-18 July 1997 in Hamburg, Germany


30k GIF




News Releases:-[eng/fr]
"Confintea Adopts Declaration and Agenda for the Future on Adult Learning For All" {18 July 1997}
"Speaker of German Parliament and UNESCO Director-General Hail Historic Turning Point" {18 July 1997}
" Regional Trends reflect role of Adult Education in Empowerment and Liberation" {17 July 1997}
"Message from Bill Clinton to Confintea" {17 July}
" Tribute to Paulo Freire and Dame Nita Barrow: Champions of Empowerment" {16 July}
"Confintea V Opens" {14 July}
"UNESCO Conference on Adult Education" {5 May}

Features & Interviews:
"Confintea Secretary-General Hails Confintea's results" {18 July 1997}
"Confintea tackles Adult Environmental Education" {17 July}
" Lida Sheffer, Only Russian Delegate at CONFINTEA" {17 July 1997}
"Confintea talks about Gender Justice" {16 July}
"Two new Publications launched at Confintea" {16 July}
"U.S. Delegation notes low-level Literacy" {15 July}
"British Under-Secretary stresses a Learning Society" {14 July}

Declaration of the 5th International Conference on Adult Education-{Adopted 18 July}

Agenda for the Future of Adult Learning-{18 July}

Confintea Daily Journal-{last updated 17 July}

Ideas, comments & questions



Ten Themes
{Click on them}

Adult Learning and the Challenges of the 21st Century Improving the Conditions and Quality of Adult Learning
Ensuring the Universal Rights of Adults and Out-of-School Youth to Literacy and Basic Education The Empowerment of Women Through Adult Learning
Adult Learning in a Changing World of Work Population, Health, Environment
Adult Learning, Culture, Media and New Information Technology Adult Learning and Groups with Special Needs
The Economics of Adult Learning Enhancing International Cooperation and Solidarity



Information

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Working Groups Timetable-(updated 15 July)
Participants List--(updated 15 July)
Opening Speeches--(14 July)
Estimated Adult Literacy Rates
Towards Lifelong Education for All
Key Documents for Adoption
The Previous Conferences
Partners and Sponsors
List of Resource People
UNESCO Institute for Education
Learning for Life
--{UNESCO Sources No. 91 in English/Espa˝ol/Franšais}
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This electronic press kit was also coded at UNESCO's Office of Public Information (OPI).



























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Theme 1: Adult Learning and the Challenges of the 21st Century

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Background
Adult learning is one of the keys to the 21st century. It releases the energies and creativity of men and women. It is both a consequence of active citizenship and a condition for full participation in society. It is a powerful force for fostering sustainable development, promoting democracy and justice, and building a world in which violent conflict and war are replaced by dialogue and a culture of peace. Adult learning, in brief, is indispensable in the quest to construct a better and fuller future for humanity.

Among the challenging issues of the 21st century to which adult learning should contribute are: alleviating poverty; consolidating democratic processes; strengthening and protecting human rights; promoting a culture of peace; encouraging active citizenship; strengthening the role of civil society; ensuring the equality and empowerment of women; appreciating cultural diversity, including the use of language; and furthering justice and equality for minorities and indigenous peoples.

Indeed, to reinforce democracy, it is essential to strengthen the learning environments to improve not only political life, but also the society's economic productivity and distribution, thereby reducing poverty.

We must act with the utmost urgency to increase public, private and community investment in adult learning, the key to unlocking the potential and creativity of people and thereby dramatically transforming global realities. Democracy and social justice require it. Economic and social development demands it. The very survival of humanity may depend upon it.


Objectives

I. Create greater community participation:

a) To base adult education policies on active citizenship and participatory democracy for the creation of learning communities and for the improvement of democracy within the family, local and national governance.

b) To address gender inequalities through adult learning practices by (1) encouraging and developing leadership capabilities among women, thereby enabling them to participate in institutions of the state, the market, civil society and the family; and (2) by providing greater access to existing programmes and specific learning opportunities for women.


II. Raise awareness about prejudice and discrimination in society

c) To assume special responsibilities to include the issue of prejudice and discrimination (whether on the grounds of racism, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, physical disability, cast, age), tolerance and understanding in adult education programmes.

d) To develop education programmes that permit people to understand human sexuality in all its dimension and its relation to discrimination and intolerance.

e) To recognize and affirm the cultures and rights to education for women, indigenous people and other minorities by ensuring their representation in decision-making processes and provision and by supporting the publication of local and indigenous learning materials for the migrants, the refugees and the displaced people.


III. Encourage greater recognition, participation and accountability of non-governmental organisations (NGOs)

f) To recognize and finance appropriately the growing role of NGOs in providing educational opportunities for adults in all sectors, in reaching the most needy and in contributing to an active civil society.


IV. Promote a culture of peace, cultural dialogue and human rights


What will the Conference do?

CONFINTEA will discuss the learning needs of adults in developed and developing countries alike.

The Conference will identify priority areas for action, including the need for greater community participation, increased awareness about prejudice and discrimination, including respect for cultural and ethnic diversity, greater recognition, participation and accountability of NGOs and the promotion of a culture of peace through education.

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Theme 2: Improving the Conditions and Quality of Adult Learning

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Background

The need for adult learning is expanding in ways that are already outpacing traditional means of delivering education. Institutions of formal education must transform themselves into organizations that promote and deliver lifelong learning to an increasingly diverse group of adult clients. New kinds of supportive learning environments of all kinds must be established and nurtured in developed and developing countries alike.

Such activities must be grounded in an expanded vision of the right of all adults to become continuous learners and the responsibility of the governmental, private and non-profit sectors of all societies to provide the opportunities for such learning.

The needed expansion in both the quantity and quality of new adult learning activities must be guided by the key principles of openness, relevance, quality and respect for diversity. These principles mean, among other things, that:

Educational initiatives must be directed at geographic areas and parts of the population that are inadequately served by existing provisions.

Learning opportunities must be presented in ways that interest and welcome the learners in all aspects of individual and collective life, especially by taking advantage of their life experience.

Education must aim at the broad and lofty goals of opening the minds of learners to the realities and possibilities of life and to developing curiosity and a thirst for continued learning.

Adult learning opportunities must be judged by the extent to which they open new possibilities for action and further learning and enrich different aspects of the life of the learner.

A new role for the State is emerging in adult learning along with expanded partnerships devoted to adult learning within the civil society. Within governments, adult education is not confined to ministries of education - all ministries are engaged in promoting adult learning, and interministerial cooperation is growing. Moreover, employers, unions and non-governmental and community organizations are increasingly involved. This results both in a dramatic decentralization of the planning and implementation of adult learning activities and a vast expansion in the range of learning areas to be covered.


What will the Conference do?

Participants will discuss concrete proposals for recognizing and expanding the right to learn of all adults. Such proposals will range from the creation of public information services to the mounting of national campaigns and the extension of International Literacy Day (September 8) to cover the whole domain of adult learning.

The Conference will consider legislative initiatives and cooperative efforts with the private sector aimed at ensuring accessibility to learning opportunities for adults. Topics to be discussed will include time-sharing, job-sharing, paid study leaves, reimbursement of tuition fees, child care and modification of work schedules.

CONFINTEA will explore mechanisms for cooperative activities across various sectors, such as education, labour, health, environment, social welfare and culture.

Institutions of higher education and research centres will be encouraged to become more accessible to adult learners through changes in entrance requirements and the establishment of joint university-community research, education and training activities.

Participants will examine possible measures to improve the recruitment, training, re-training, in-service training, career development, working conditions and remuneration of personnel engaged in youth and adult education programmes.

The Conference will invite national authorities to become more active in monitoring adult education activities and publishing data on both the quantity of such activities and the quality of various approaches.
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Theme 3: Ensuring the Universal Right to Literacy and Basic Education

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Background

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights asserted in 1948 that "everyone has a right to education," and over the years the international community has repeatedly reaffirmed that right. At the beginning of this decade, participants in the World Conference on Education for All (Jomtien, Thailand, 1990) issued a Declaration stating that "Every person -- child, youth and adult -- shall be able to benefit from educational opportunities designed to meet their basic learning needs." Although much progress has been made towards this goal, approximately one billion adults in the world are unable to read and write. Giving these persons the tools they need to participate fully in their societies as workers, citizens and parents is both wise public policy and a moral imperative.

Literacy and basic education empower people, both as individuals and as members of their communities. Literacy opens up avenues of communication, makes possible the acquisition of new skills, promotes self-respect and expands personal choice. It is the essential precondition for effective participation in political and social institutions and for the exercising of most other human and legal rights.

Literacy can no longer be seen simply as a matter of being able to use the alphabet. Literacy now involves a variety of different skills that enable a person to process the information necessary to function in today's increasingly complex world.

The International Adult Literacy Survey carried out in seven northern countries (Canada, Germany, Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland and the US) measured the ability of adults to deal with three types of literacy: prose literacy (the ability to understand straight texts), document literacy (reading of tables, charts, maps, forms, etc.) and quantitative literacy (comprehension of numerical information). The survey, Literacy, Economy and Society (Paris, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - OECD, 1995), revealed that some of the world's richest nations have a high percentage of adults in the lowest of the five bands used in scoring -- over 20 percent in the US, over 16 percent in Canada and over 10 percent in the Netherlands. Such persons cannot successfully handle such tasks as filling out an application for a job or reading a bus schedule.

The promotion of literacy also remains a matter of enormous concern in the developing world, and since the Jomtien Conference a number of countries have launched highly successful mass literacy programmes. India, for example, is spending a massive 8 percent of its education budget on adult literacy, reaching 50 million people every year. Although the number of literate persons has risen during the 1990s, virtually no dent has been made in the number of illiterate adults. The problem has been especially marked in the least developed countries and those with high population growth.

Most of the effort to work toward the goal of "education for all" has gone into primary schooling for children. While enhancing access to schooling for children is an important task, it must not be pursued at the cost of neglecting adult basic education programmes.

The right to learn of the nearly 1,000 million adults, almost two-thirds of them women, who have been denied the opportunity to attend primary school should be recognized.


What will the Conference do?

CONFINTEA will aim to convey the message that formal schooling for children and basic education programmes for adults should complement each other in protecting and enhancing a fundamental human right. Conference participants will examine ways to create this complementarity.

Governments will be urged to make a strong commitment to the advancement of literacy.

CONFINTEA will promote a pluralistic approach to literacy, defending the right of people to learn in their mother tongue and emphasizing that there are many different forms of literacy, depending on the cultural context.

The Conference will urge that literacy programmes be combined with education for empowerment and participatory citizenship.

Participants will explore ways of improving the training of literacy personnel and of ensuring that neoliterates retain their skills through post-literacy programmes and access to reading materials.
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Theme 4: Promoting the Empowerment of Women through Adult Learning

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Background

A "gender gap" characterizes education in developed and developing countries alike. Overall, girls enrol in school at lower rates than boys, and they are more likely than boys to drop out before completing primary school. The gender gap widens with each succeeding level of education: lower secondary, upper secondary, university and beyond. Of the estimated one billion adults in the world who did not go to school, two-thirds are women.

An important aspect of women's education is what has been called feminist consciousness-raising, that is to say, efforts to draw women's attention to the forms of oppression under which they suffer, to make them aware of their rights and to help them develop ways of shaping their own lives. Many of these initiatives are combined with the teaching of literacy and practical skills. In the Indian State of Uttar Pradesh groups of women are learning to read and also being trained as water-pump mechanics. In China, comparable schemes linking literacy with skills ranging from tree-grafting to pig-raising, are reaching out to millions of rural women.

In industrialized nations the gender gap is narrowing. Girls in OECD countries (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) now complete secondary school and go on to higher education at approximately the same rates as boys. Nevertheless, of the estimated 9 million adults who have difficulties to write and read in Europe in 1995, two-thirds are female. Inequities also exist in the adult continuing education programmes that are becoming increasingly important in the emerging "knowledge society." Such services are disproportionately directed towards males, who are also more likely than females to have their studies paid for by employers. Programmes with large female enrolments tend to be shorter and less oriented around professional advancement.

Adult learning policies should give priority to expanding educational opportunities for women and eliminating prejudices and stereotypes that both limit their access to adult education and restrict the benefits they derive from participating in it. Women have a right to equal opportunities; society, in turn, depends on their full contribution in all fields of work and aspects of life.


What will the Conference do?

Participants in CONFINTEA will review the latest research findings on the impact of investment in basic education for girls and women. Since most of the research has focused on the impact of primary schooling, they will be especially interested in any new studies that examine the results of programmes for adult women.

Leaders of programmes aimed at addressing the basic education needs of adult women will describe their programmes and the reasons for their successes and failures. New approaches will be debated.

Participants will also discuss how basic education for adult women relates to broader social, economic and political issues such as gender discrimination and the rise of women's movements in both developed and developing countries.

The Conference will encourage women to organize themselves and create women's organizations to bring about empowerment through education.

The Conference will call for a more gender-sensitive pedagogy for both sexes.
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Theme 5: Adult Learning and the Changing World of Work

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Background

The nature of work in the emerging global economy is changing rapidly and dramatically. The market-based economies that will dominate the early years of the 21st century are striking in two ways. First, they are global. Not only goods and services but people, investment funds, technologies and even ideas routinely move back and forth across national borders. Second, they are knowledge-based. Whereas wealth in the 19th and 20th centuries was usually based on the land, raw materials, labour or access to capital, the most important economic "resource" for the foreseeable future will be knowledge and information.

The emergence of a global, knowledge-based society has greatly changed the nature of work. The traditional phases of life -- vocational training, active employment and retirement -- are being disrupted. Technology is developing at ever-increasing speed, global competition is intensifying as industry continually seeks greater efficiency, and secure jobs are becoming more and more scarce. The British sociologist Charles Handy predicts that in a few years time major firms will be able to cut their work force by half, pay them twice as much and obtain three times the productivity. Whole departments will be closed, and more and more work will be contracted out to small, specialized companies. The level of skills and information required for employment in the emerging economy is also rising.

Under such conditions continuing education and training programmes become increasingly essential. Employers will demand creative, flexible people who can continue to update their knowledge and skills throughout their lives. Vocational and general education need not exclude one another, and indeed all-round human development has been shown to have real economic benefit. This is a lesson that has been learned by the Rover Group in Britain, which in 1990 launched a massive educational programme that offered employees not only job-related training but grants to study whatever they wished, from poetry to guitar-playing. In part because of its more motivated, flexible and creative work force, Rover's annual profits rose over the next two years from a break-even point to 225 million pounds (363,8 million dollars ), and its annual revenue per head went from 31,000 pounds (50,123 dollars) in 1989 to 122,000 pounds (197,260 dollars) in 1993.


What will the Conference do?

CONFINTEA will look for ways to promote adult learning that will both address immediate vocational needs and provide a foundation for future learning.

Participants will examine the structural changes now underway in the workforce and the social and political context in which these changes are taking place. What should be the respective roles of the state and the social partners with regard to vocational training? Are new laws needed in this area? Should, for example, employees have the right to 10 days of paid educational leave every two years, as they do in some countries?

The Conference will look at the role that non-formal educational initiatives play in work-related education, and they will examine the kind of vocational education needed in situations that demand creativity and productivity. They will also address the question of how vocational training can be linked with education that enables workers to widen their horizons as full human beings.

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Theme 6: Adult Learning in Relation to Environment, Health and Population

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Background

Although environment, health and population issues are intricately linked in the role they play in sustaining development, it is important to recognize that each one of them constitutes a complex issue requiring a holistic approach.

Population issues are no longer solely understood in terms of reducing demographic growth. They are now placed within a framework which enables much greater comprehension on how social, cultural and political factors affect women's and men's reproductive decisions, which are now recognized as part of human rights. Among the various factors which affect such decisions, education stands as a key element. It is, thus, most necessary to provide women and men with information on sexuality and reproduction as well as to facilitate their access to reproductive and sexual health services.

Health is no longer discussed in term of specific issues alone such as disease prevention or individual life-style. While preventive measures are still an important question for health-related adult education, more so as large epidemic diseases are prevailing and even expanding, adult learning for health needs to overcome prescriptive approaches and enable individuals and communities to have greater control over their health. Adult learning is increasingly becoming integrated into larger health promotion policies which address health issues under a human rights frame and in a holistic perspective including cultural, social and economic aspects.

Environmental issues cover a variety of natural and urban scenarios dealing with the relation of women and men to the word and encompassing phenomena such as pollution, over-consumption, de-forestation, poverty and others. Adult learning in this regard provides a basis for the understanding of people's relation to the environment and their specific behaviours in as much as these have repercussions on the state of the environment. It occupies a unique role in community and social efforts to change the detrimental effects of human exploitation and environmental degradation.

All these issues are part of the wider quest for sustainable development which cannot be attained without a strong education emphasis also on issues such as ageing, migration, urbanization and inter-generational and family relations. The issues of health, population and environment require not only expert knowledge, but also changes in the understanding and behaviour of people and governments. The public should have access to information in order to demand and follow-up sound public policies towards health, environment and population issues. Women and men should be aware that they are entitled to rights and have responsibilities in all of these matters.


What will the Conference do?

Participants will look for ways to use adult education activities, including non-formal programmes, to increase the capacity of citizens from different sectors of society to support ecologically and socially sustainable development. Particular attention will be paid to efforts aimed at changing production and consumption patterns in developed countries.

The Conference will examine the ways in which minority and indigenous communities have a special authority and role in protecting their own environment and in the role that learning plays in disseminating this accumulated knowledge.

Recognizing the critical role of health education in enhancing the health of communities and individuals, CONFINTEA will pursue ways to extend such education in all aspects of health, including disease prevention, nutrition, sanitation and mental health.

Participants will put special emphasis on building health education programmes that take into account cultural understandings of health and build on what people already know.

Special emphasis will be placed on health education programmes that take into account the reproductive and child-care roles of women. Programmes directed at women have been shown to be especially effective because women are in a special position to apply their knowledge of health and nutrition to their families and to pass such knowledge on to the next generation.
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Theme 7: Adult Learning, Media and Culture

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Background

The mass media have long been a vital part of the learning environment for adults. Newspapers and magazines play an important role as conveyors of information, while radio and television are used systematically in distance learning. Museums and libraries provide a space for learning based on local and foreign cultures alike. The cultural infrastructures constitute potential learning environments.

Today there are enormous opportunities for the creative use of both traditional and new media for teaching and learning. When the only medium of instruction was printed texts, it was impossible to teach oneself to read. Now, however, videos, interactive compact discs and the Internet can transform the role of teachers and empower illiterate adults to become self-educators. With an Internet link, it should eventually be possible for people to take anything from a literacy course to a study programme in advanced engineering. Already there are courses where students interact with professors, carry out joint study projects with fellow students by e-mail and even engage in "virtual reality" seminars.

Thus far, however, access to these new information technologies is limited primarily to privileged residents of industrialized countries in North America, Europe and certain parts of Asia. For many persons in these nations and for vast areas of the developing world access is either non-existent or sharply limited because of cost.

Issues of cultural imperialism are also beginning to emerge. If the Internet becomes more widely used, as it most surely will, there is a real danger that it will serve as an instrument for transferring the values, languages and cultural norms of the industrialized north.

Then, too, there is the matter of information overload. Persons seeking to use the Internet for educational purposes are frequently overwhelmed by the complexity and the sheer volume of the information that surges back and forth over the information highway. In the 21st century people must learn to become active, critical and discriminating users of both traditional and new media. In this way they will not only resist political and commercial manipulation but acquire the necessary skills to participate actively in the global civic society.


What will the Conference do?

The Conference will consider ways in which traditional methods of teaching and learning can be combined with the new technical opportunities. Participants will also look at the technical, financial and cultural issues involved in installing the new media and technologies and at their implications for teaching/learning methods and environments.

CONFINTEA will address such questions as whether the traditional definition of literacy should be expanded to include (1) abstract and critical thinking skills and (2) skills in information processing.

The Conference will discuss how cultural institutions such as museums, cultural sites and natural parks can become stimulating learning environments.


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Theme 8: Adult Learning and Groups with Special Needs

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Background

While adult learning should be open to all, the reality is that many groups in society are poorly and unequally served. The most obvious examples are ageing populations, migrants and refugees, nomads and people with disabilities or disadvantages of various kinds. Such individuals have the right to learn, and society needs their creative participation.

Moreover, members of special groups have rich contributions to make to the teaching and learning process. Older persons, for example, have vast experience and wisdom that can be shared with others. By learning together, we can learn to live together.

Those engaged in adult learning are of every age and every social and occupational background, though the more privileged and better educated tend to be better served than others. The most urgent concern of adult education must be that of reaching the unreached and the deliberately excluded.


What will the Conference do?

CONFINTEA will discuss forms of education and training that allow older adults to actively take part in society and to live a productive life. One specific topic will be ways to take advantage of the 1999 United Nations Year of Older People to support the role of older adults in building our societies.

Participants will examine programmes aimed at migrants, displaced populations and refugees that go beyond second-language education and work-oriented training. Programmes of special interest will include those that promote dialogue between cultures, especially those that involve politicians and media experts, judges and others involved in legal systems, immigration officials, educators, health and other social workers.

The Conference will explore ways to offer opportunities to prisoners who wish to participate in training programmes. Special topics of focus will include ways to facilitate the access of NGO's, teachers and other providers of education to prisons and ways to link educational activities within prison walls to those outside them.
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Theme 9: The Economics of Adult Learning

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Background

Devising effective methods of funding must clearly be an important part of any adult and continuous education strategy for the future, especially at a time when the role of the state is shifting and the private sector is playing an increasingly important role.

Defining current levels of investment in adult education with precision is difficult. In most countries the financing of adult education is more confined to the ministry of education but is also becoming a function of ministries of health, agriculture and other sectors, and is part of the investment programme of industries and a concern of local authorities.

The funding problems of adult education in developing nations have been compounded by the fact that financial crises and structural adjustment programmes have caused many governments to make significant budget cuts in social programmes, including education. Adult education, which often lacks an organized political constituency, has been particularly hard hit. In Latin America, for example, according to one estimate, the average state budget for adult education represents less than two percent of the education budget.

Given the diverse impact of adult education, it is important that the methods used in cost-benefit analyses should reflect the multiple impacts of adult learning on society. Countries should not be forced to sacrifice future hopes in order to relieve current financial distress. Adult education, being a productive investment, should not be subject to the restraints of structural adjustment. On the contrary, it should be used to offset the negative impact of such adjustments on other sectors.

The cost of adult learning must be seen in relationship to the benefits that derive from it. Payoffs from investment in enhancing the competency of adults through education include not only higher economic productivity but social benefits such as better health, nutrition, family planning and environmental quality. Furthermore, as countless studies have documented, the education of adults contributes importantly to the education and educability of children. Cutting investment in adult education is therefore clearly a false economy.

Although recent years have seen a growing interest in basic education in developing countries, most of the resulting investment has been directed to formal primary schooling for children. Indeed, many outside donors appear to have made policy decisions to shift their investments in this direction. Overall investment in adult basic education in developing countries thus often lags behind.


What will the Conference do?

Participants will consider data showing trends in funding for adult education in both developed and developing nations.

The Conference will examine a new approach to human resource development that requires the various governmental sectors (agriculture, health, economics and so forth) to build an adult learning component into their activities and to earmark a share of their budget for this purpose.

CONFINTEA will look at ways in which the social partners can be enlisted to promote adult education. One possible approach is to establish a special fund for adult education that would be allocated at least 0.3 percent of the salary and 0.1 percent of the total budget of business enterprises. Another possibility is to support adult education through creative community initiatives such as income-generating activities.

Participants will study ways in which the international community can facilitate adult basic education in developing countries. One option, known as "debt swapping," is to convert the current debts of the least developed countries into investment in human resource development.

The Conference will also study the proposal contained in the Report to UNESCO of the International Commission on Education for the 21st Century chaired by J. Delors, Learning: The Treasure Within (Paris, UNESCO, 1996), to establish an "Entitlement to Lifelong Learning" in the form of a credit that could be used for educational purposes at different stages of one's life.

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Theme 10: Enhancing International Co-operation and Solidarity

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Background

Adult education can contribute not only to the social and economic well-being of individual nations but to peace, justice and stability among all nations. Ways must be found to maximize these benefits to the global community.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, proclaimed by the United Nations nearly 50 years ago, stressed the need for international cooperation conducted in a manner which promotes free and equal exchanges among peoples and which develops bonds of mutual understanding and respect between them.

The world now being shaped by the forces of globalization, democratization and knowledge-based economies faces grave dangers if whole societies, or substantial groups of citizens within nations, are systematically excluded from meaningful participation in economic, social, political, cultural and other forms of human activity. When critical masses of persons are marginalized, society becomes polarized and unstable.

In such a context adult education can help to build mutual respect and understanding between peoples and cultures. Adult learning that strengthens local expertise constitutes a powerful tool for development. National, regional and global networks can be built to promote the sharing of information and the building of professional skills and other capacities.


What will the Conference do?

CONFINTEA will work towards strengthening national, regional and global adult learning networks with the aim of sharing knowledge, skills and capacities and promoting a spirit of mutual cooperation and understanding.

The Conference will offer an opportunity for decision-makers, social partners, adult learning facilitators and learners to meet one another in groups composed on a South-South, East-West, and South-North basis.

Participants will seek to convince cooperative agencies of the importance of including adult learning dimensions in all development projects, investing in the capacity and integration of people.

The Conference will work toward the formulating of a charter on the fundamental rights and responsibilities of different actors (citizens, enterprises, public institutions, providers, associations and so forth) in the field of adult and continuing education.
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ESTIMATED ADULT LITERACY RATES BY REGION, 1980 to 2010

9k Graph





ESTIMATED ADULT LITERACY RATES
BY REGION AND GENDER, 1995

9k Graph



Source: Adult Education in a Polarizing World, Education for All: Status and Trends, 1997 EFA Forum, UNESCO

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Towards Lifelong Education for All

The 5th International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA) is taking place at a time when lifelong learning is gaining a new momentum. "Lifelong Education for All" was chosen in 1994 as the major term of reference for the UNESCO Midterm Strategy covering the period 1996-2001 as well as for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). All the global conferences during the last ten years, from Rio to Istanbul have concluded on the absolute necessity of an informed and creative participation of men and women in all spheres of life if humanity is to meet the risks and challenges ahead.

Adult and continuing education is no longer a marginal phenomenon. In advanced industrialized and post traditional societies today, more than one third of the population participate every year in organized educational activities. In Mediterranean Europe the estimated figure is around 20% and in Northern Europe more than 50%. The educational scene in such countries has changed deeply: the adult learners are now exceeding in numbers the total population of students in primary and secondary schools.

At the workplace, developments in technology and changing patterns of employment have brought the need for continuous updating of skills throughout the lifespan. Patterns of non-working life have also changed, providing remarkable new spaces for inner enrichment, creativity and the broadening of horizons. Millions of adults all over the world are experiencing profound changes in their lives because of the learning opportunities offered to them.

At the same time there are millions more throughout the world with educational aspirations and needs that are not being met. Approximately one billion adults want and need to learn to read but have not had the opportunity. Women all over the world are developing new educational claims and aspirations as gender roles are redefined and life patterns change. Indigenous peoples, minorities, senior citizens, prisoners... all of these and many other categories constitute a vast adult learning demand, which needs to be met.

The aim of the Hamburg Conference is to stimulate a new worldwide thrust towards adult and continuing education. It is our belief that the learning capacity of human beings will be central to the task of shaping the new century and the new millennium.


by Paul Bélanger

Director, UNESCO Institute for Education, Hamburg

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Paris, May 5 - UNESCO's Fifth International Conference on Adult Education to be held in Hamburg, Germany, July 14 to 18, will bring together representatives of the Organisation's Member States, U.N. agencies and international organisations, who will seek ways of increasing the world-wide availablility of life-long education, an ever more crucial need in a changing world.

The Conference aims to forge world-wide commitment to adult and continuing education in the perspective of lifelong learning; to promote exchange of experience; recommend future policy priorities and reinforce and expand the international network for co-operation in adult education. Lifelong education has become imperative in view of changing patterns of employment and technological progress.

While progress has been made during the 1990s in increasing the number of school-aged children enrolled in formal education, we must act with the utmost urgency to increase public, private and community investment in adult learning, the key to unlocking the potential and creativity of people all over the world.

The Conference - whose theme is "Adult Learning: a Key for the 21st Century" - will debate 10 themes: adult education and democracy, seeking ways to create greater community participation and recognize cultural diversity; improving the conditions and quality of adult learning and a review of the role of the state and social partners; the universal right to literacy and basic education; the empowerment of women; the changing world of work; the environment, health and population; culture, media and new information technologies; specific groups, notably ageing populations, migrants, prison inmates and people with special needs; the economics of adult learning with the aim of creating funds for life-long education through measures concerning the private sector and the state; enhancing international co-operation and solidarity.

The Conference will also feature three round table debates on the following themes: adult literacy and human-centred development; adult learning and the crisis of work; and adult learning and empowerment of women. Two of these round tables will have satellite links with North America and India.

The Fifth International Conference on Adult Education, which will adopt a Declaration and an Agenda for the Future, will reflect the fact that adult learning is increasingly the means not only for refreshing and expanding knowledge, but also for promoting active citizenship and effective democracy. As a consequence of the far-reaching changes in the role that knowledge and individual competence play in the contemporary world, adult learning is growing rapidly in scope and scale. The rise of participatory democracy and the need for people to be more actively involved in the economic development and political governance of their societies are further factors driving the expansion of adult education.

Major challenges to be addressed by the Conference include the crisis of employment and the continuing discrimination against women in most societies and problems of exclusion. The Conference will also examine how adult education is to make openness to the culture of others a complement to an appreciation of one's own cultural identity. This is particularly important as "learning to live together by developing an understanding of others and their history, traditions and spiritual values" is one of the greatest challenges of the next millennium, according to Jacques Delors who headed the commission which produced "Learning: the Treasure Within - a Report to UNESCO of the International Commission on Education for the 21st Century".

The UNESCO Conference - organised by the Hamburg-based UNESCO Institute for Education, which specialises in non-formal basic education and lifelong learning - will also be attended by representatives of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organisation (WHO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Bank, the African Development Bank, the Caribbean Community Secretariat as well as the Commission of the European Communities and the Council of Europe. Many non-governmental organisations, foundations and development agencies are also expected.

In keeping with the previous conferences on adult education - Elsinore, 1949; Montreal, 1960; Tokyo, 1972; and Paris, 1985 - the Hamburg Conference will be guided by a vision of adult learning as a human right and as a means of achieving universal literacy, promoting international peace, contributing to sustainable development and fostering equality of opportunity.

****

For further information:
UNESCO Press Service, 7 Place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07 SP, France
Tel.: +33 (0) 1 45 68 16 70
Fax: + 33 (0) 1 45 68 56 52


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Tentative Schedule:


Languages:
The opening session, closing session and commissions are in the six official U.N. languages
(English, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic and Chinese) + German.
The thematic working groups and round tables are in two languages (English and another official U.N. language)
.


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CONFINTEA: Key Documents to be Adopted

Delegates at CONFINTEA will be invited to adopt a Declaration on Adult Learning and an Agenda for the Future. The drafts to be presented for revision and adoption by the Conference are the result of a year-long process of dialogue and debate in which member states, partner organizations and networks throughout the world have contributed their input. These texts will be debated in commissions on the fourth day of the Conference and will be submitted to the final session for adoption. The following is a brief outline based on provisional versions of the two documents.

Declaration on Adult Learning

The Declaration is a broad policy manifesto that aims to set the trajectory for adult learning in the coming century. It begins with an affirmation of belief in the active capacity of citizens throughout the world to shape the 21st century and in the importance of creating a learning democracy in which each woman and man has the means to lifelong self-development. In this context, adult learning is seen to be a key element in the effort to create a better future for humanity. The document goes on to recognize that adult education is responding to profound changes taking place in the world, including shifting work patterns, changes in the role of the state, and the growth of knowledge-based societies. The text underlines the importance of adult learning across many sectors including health, industry and the environment. Key rubrics under which the future development of adult education is discussed are: adult literacy, women's empowerment, the transformation of the formal and the informal economy, diversity and equality, promoting a culture of peace, and access to information. The Declaration ends with an appeal for action calling for increased public, private and community investment in adult learning and proclaiming a commitment to efforts to ensure that adults have the opportunity to learn throughout their lives.

Agenda for the Future

The Agenda for the Future is a longer document containing a series of more specific and detailed proposals. It sets adult education in its historical context, describing its development in the international arena over the past few decades, the changing role of the state, the increasing participation of non-governmental organizations and the way in which adult education has come to encompass virtually every sector and involve a growing number and variety of partners.The document then deals in turn with each of the themes of CONFINTEA, stating the main issues to be addressed, the guiding principles to be followed the specific objectives recommended. Running through the document are a number of related motifs. One of these is the affirmation of the value of adult learning as a means of empowerment for the excluded, the marginalized and the disadvantaged.Thus, specific measures are recommended for promoting gender-sensitive pedagogy, and for enhancing learning opportunities for categories such as migrants, prisoners and senior citizens. Another motif common to many of the recommendations is a concern to promote education that is learner-centred and takes account of diverse needs, perspectives and cultural backgrounds. For example, it is recommended that people should be enabled to learn in their own language and within their own culture and that literacy should be linked to the social context of the learners. By the same token, indigenous and popular knowledge should be integrated into adult education programmes. Concrete measures recommended under various headings include: extending International Literacy Day (8 September) to cover the whole domain of adult learning; opening the doors of formal educational institutions to adults of all ages; calling upon the 1998 International Conference on Higher Education for the 21st Century in Paris to promote the transformation of post-secondary institutions into lifelong learning institutions; to call upon Member States to invest at least 6% of GNP in education, of which an equitable share should be allocated to adult and continuing education; to develop active health, environment and population policies giving people the spaces and the means to participate, to create stimulating learning environments at home, at work, in the community; to promote the ratification and application of the 1974 ILO Convention 140 (International Labour Organization) concerning paid educational leave and secure real learning opportunities for all adults; to explore the possibilities of imposing a tax on international trade to be used for adult education in the countries where the products originate; and to convert the current debts of the least developed countries, based on debt swap proposals, into investment in human development.



LIST OF DOCUMENTS


Working documents [E/F/S/R/A/C]

ED-97/CONFINTEA/1 Provisional Agenda
ED-97/CONFINTEA/2 Rules of Procedure
ED-97/CONFINTEA/3 Progress, Achievements and Problems: A Retrospective Review of Adult Education since 1985
ED-97/CONFINTEA/4 Adult Learning: Empowerment for Local and Global Change in the Twenty-first Century
ED-97/CONFINTEA/5* Draft Declaration
ED-97/CONFINTEA/6* Draft Agenda for the Future
ED-97/CONFINTEA/7** Final Report


Information documents [E/F]

ED-97/CONFINTEA/INF.1 General Information
ED-97/CONFINTEA/INF.2 Suggestions concerning the Organization of the Work of the Conference
ED-97/CONFINTEA/INF.3 List of Documents
ED-97/CONFINTEA/INF.4 Provisional List of Participants



* Documents issued during CONFINTEA V

** Document issued after CONFINTEA V


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The Previous Conferences

CONFINTEA builds on the work of the four previous conferences, each of which took the debate on adult education a stage further.


Elsinore, Denmark, 1949

Meeting soon after the traumas of the Second World War, participants at the Elsinor conference were concerned that adult education should promote democracy and international understanding. The meeting emphasized the importance of adult literacy. It also affirmed the concept of an all-round adult education which responded to adults' intellectual, social and artistic impulses, and which was distinct from purely vocational training. The important role of radio, cinema, the press and public libraries in education was acknowledged.


Montréal, Canada, 1960

The Montréal conference continued in the spirit of Elsinor but introduced a number of new themes, such as the importance of adult education in helping the newly independent countries, in combating inequality and in promoting gender equality. The meeting also called for more research into the learning needs of adults and into effective methods of teaching them. An important new motif introduced at Montréal was that education should be seen as a permanent, lifelong process. Cooperation was recommended between adult educators and people working in the media.


Tokyo, Japan, 1972

Delegates at the Tokyo meeting further stressed the importance of adult education for the developing world and in helping the poor and disadvantaged. At the same time, the meeting introduced a new emphasis on the quality and accessibility of adult education, along with issues such as population policy, protection of the environment and education for senior citizens. There were again many references to the essential role of the media.


Paris, France, 1985

The Paris conference established a new landmark by including in its final declaration a universal right to learn throughout one's lifetime. The meeting showed an awareness of the growing importance of information technology and modern media, and argued for their integration into adult education programmes. The meeting also called for the full professionalization of adult educators, and emphasized the need for creativity and innovation in adult learning. UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}

5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION
List of Resource People

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THEME 1

Minorities:
Alan Phillips
Director, MRG (Minority Rights Group)
379 Brixton Road
UK - London SW9 7DE
Tel.: +44 171 978 9498
Fax: +44 171 738 6265

Indigenous:
Nora Rameka
Center for Continuing Education
University of Waikato
Private Bag 3105
Hamilton
New Zealand
Tel.: +64-7-838 4214
Fax: +67-7-856 2884
E-mail: nrameka@waikato.ac.nz

Democracy:
Ove Korsgaard, President of the AWE,
Valorevej 59, DK - 4130 Viby
Tel./Fax: +45 4619 4839
E-mail: ove@dlhi.dlh.dk


THEME 2

Universities:
Budd L Hall
Professor and Chair
The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto - Ontario M58 1V6, Canada
Tel.: +1 416 923-6641
Fax: +1 416 926-4725
E-mail: bhall@oise.utoronto.ca


Research:
Ramón Flecha
Director of Research
Research Centre on Adult Education (CREA)
Universitat de Barcelona
Psg. Vall d'Hebron 171
Migdia 2 planta
E - 08035 Barcelona
Tel.: +34 93 403 5171/Fax: +34 93 403 5099
E-mail: crea@d5.ub.es


Educational Policies:
Eric Bockstael
Interdisciplinary Program
College of Lifelong Learning
Wayne State University
Detroit - Michigan 48202
USA
Tel.: +1 313 824 6468
Fax: +1 313 824 2945
E-mail:ebocks@cll.wayne.edu


Monitoring:
Albert Tuijnman
OECD
2 rue André-Pascal
F - 75755 Paris
Tel.: +33 1 4524 9288
Fax: + 33 1 4524-9098


Documentation:
Terrance Keenan
Special Collections Librarian
Syracuse University Library
Syracuse - New York, 13244-2010
USA
Tel.: +1 315 443 2697
Fax: +1 315 443 2671
E-mail:arents1@hawk.syr.edu


THEME 3

Global and regional issues:
A. Victor Ordonez
Director
UNESCO Bangkok Office
P.O. Box 967 Prakanong
P.O. Box 967 Prakanong
10110 Bangkok Thailand
Tel.: +66 2 3918474/10577/10703
Fax: + 66 2 3910866


Literacy at local level:
Peter Easton
Center for Policy Studies in Education
Florida State University
312 Stone Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4076
USA
Tel.: +1 904 644 5042
Fax: +1 904 644 1595/6401
E-mail: easton@coe.fsu.edu


Learning strategies:
Luis Benavides
CIPAE
Mexico
Tel.: +52 22 46 0555
Fax: +52 22 45 5885

Literacy environments:
Ingrid Jung
Deutsche Stiftung für Puebla,
Internationale Entwicklung
Hans-Böckler-Str. 5
D - 53225 Bonn
Tel.: +49 228 4001 207
Fax: +49 228 4001 111


Literacy of the future:
Agneta Lind
Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA)
S - 10525 Stockholm
Tel.: +46 8 6985249
Fax: +46 8 6985647
E-mail: agneta.lind@sida.se


THEME 4

1. Vimala Ramachandran
XC-1 SAH Vikas
68 I.P. Extension
New Delhi, India
Tel.: +91 11 2432 948/2432 770
Fax: + 91 11 6985 819 c/o ASPBAE

2. Sara Hlupekile Longwe
Development Consultants
36 Villa Wanga, Chelston
P.O. Box 37090
Lusaka, Zambia
Tel.: +260 1 700 829
Fax: + 260 1 226 200
E-mail: sara&ray@za.met/zm
and
Chairperson, FEMNET
African Women's Development and Communications Network
P.O. Box 54562
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel.: + 254 2 741 301/741 245
E-mail: femnet@elci.gn.apcign


THEME 5

1. Ettore Gelpi
11, rue Cambronne
F - 75015 Paris
Tel./Fax: +33 1 47 83 40 77

2. Helga Foster
Senior Researcher and Equal Opportunities Officer
The German Federal Institute for VocationalTraining (BIBB)
Room 2272 Fehrbelliner Platz 3
D - 10707 Berlin
Tel.: +49 30 8643-2539
Fax: +49 30 86 43-2455


THEME 6

Environment:
1 René Karottki
INFORSE (International Network for Sustainable Energy)
P.O. Box 2059
DK - 1013 Copenhagen K
Tel.:+45 3312 1307
Fax: +45 3312 1308
E-mail: inforse@inforse.dk
Web: http://www.inforse.di/

2. Darlene Clover
North American Alliance for
Popular and Adult Education (NAAPAE)
International Council for Adult Education
720 Bathurst St., Suite 500
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5S 2R4
Tel.: +1 416 588 1211
Fax: +1 416 588 5725
E-mail: icae@web.apc.org

Health:
1. Mariella Baldo
Education Cluster
Programme Division TA
UNICEF
3 United Nations Plaza
New York, New York 10017
Tel.: +1 212 8246617
Fax: +1 212 824 6481
E-mail: mbaldo@unicef.org

2. Desmond O' Byrne
Health Education and Health Promotion Unit (HEP)
WHO
20, avenue Appia
CH - 1211 Geneva 27
Tel.: +41 22 791-2578
Fax: +41 22 791 0746
E-mail: obyrnedwho.ch

Population:
Wendy Harcourt
Society for International Development
Via Panisperna 207
I - 00184 Rome, Italy
Tel.: + 39 6 4872172
Fax: +39 6487 2170


THEME 7

New Information and Communication Technologies:
Judith Tobin
Beleto International Inc.
100 Simcoe Street Suite 305
Toronto - Ontario
Canada M5H 3G2
Tel.: +1 416 351 1275
Fax: + 1 416 351 7479
E-mail: jtobin@interlog.com

Museums and Cultural Environment:

1. Jutta Thinesse-Demel
Project "Adult Education and Museums"
Geyerspergerstr. 42
80689 München - Germany
Tel.: +49 89 580 6664
Fax: +49 89 580 3466

2. Paolo Orefice
Professor of Adult Education and
Dean of the Faculty
"Scienze della Formazione"
Via Parione 7
I - 50123 Florence, Italy
Tel.: +39 55 21 74 24
Fax: + 39 55 29 22 52
E-mail: OREFICE@cesit1.unifi.it

THEME 8

Disabled People:
Lucy Wong-Hernandez
Executive Director
Disabled Peoples International
1160 Sunapee Road
West Hempstead
NY 11522
Fax: +1 516 599 2571

Ageing:
Rosa Ma. Falgàs i Casanovas
European Association for the Education of Adults
c/. Pere Vergés 1
E - 08020 Barcelona
Tel.: +34 3 278 02 94
Fax: +34 3 278 01 74
E-mail:rmfc@redestb.es

Prisons:
Peter Sutton, Hillside, 30 Grundys Lane, Malvern Wells
Worcs WR14 4HS - UK
Tel./Fax: +44 1684 575731



THEME 9

Abrar Hasan, Head of Education and Training Division
OECD
2, rue André Pascal, F - 75755 Paris
Tel.: +33 1 45249221
Fax: +33 14524 9098



THEME 10

Wolfgang Leumer
IIZ/DVV, Obere Wilhelmstr. 32
D - 53225 Bonn
Tel.: +49 228 9756950
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UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}

5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION

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UNESCO gratefully acknowledges the support provided by:

Official cooperating partners for the Conference:


UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}
5th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION

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UNESCO Institute for Education (UIE)

The UIE is a non-profit international research, training, information, documentation and publishing centre of UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) based in Hamburg, Germany. One of three educational institutes of UNESCO, UIE focuses mainly on adult and continuing education, literacy and non-formal basic education in the perspective of lifelong learning. UIE, in collaboration with international partners, has been requested by the General Conference of UNESCO to play a leadership role, in cooperation with UNESCO headquarters, in the organization and follow-up of the 5th International Conference on Adult Education, to be held in Hamburg from 14 to 18 July 1997.

Founded in 1951, UIE works in close collaboration with the Paris headquarters of UNESCO and with its two sister institutions, the International Bureau of Education (IBE), Geneva, and the International Institute of Education Planning (IIEP), Paris. UIE is connected to world-wide networks of individuals, universities, research institutions, government bodies and non-governmental organizations in the field of education.

UIE's work links three spheres that are often separated: research, policy-making and educational practice.The Institute believes that only by involving the policy-maker and the practitioner can research have any real impact. The Institute's research and development programme covers a wide range of topics within its overall field of activity. Current research projects include: Adult Education and Democracy; Multilingualism and Literacy; Innovation in Nonformal and Adult Education; and Creativity, Culture and Basic Education. In addition UIE provides fellowships and research-oriented training programmes for senior officers and researchers in collaboration with partners in various countries.

The Documentation Centre and Library of the Institute acquires every year some 2,000 publications. At present it holds about 55,000 books and documents, and regularly receives 300 journals on education and social sciences with a strong focus on developing countries.

The Institute also publishes a range of books and reports based on its research projects. Since 1955, UIE has edited the International Review of Education (IRE), the longest-running international journal on the comparative theory and practice of formal and non-formal education. An annual Newsletter is published in English, French and German editions.

The follow-up to CONFINTEA will be an important element of UIE's future programme.

UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO UNESCO 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADULT EDUCATION {CONFINTEA V}