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UNESCO-mainstreaming series

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UNESCO-Mainstreaming
the needs of women
UNESCO-Mainstreaming
the needs of youth
UNESCO-Mainstreaming
the least developed countries
UNESCO-Mainstreaming
the culture of peace
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26-06-02:

Mainstreaming the
Needs of Women


Excerpt from the Director-General of UNESCO, Mr Koïchiro Matsuura's introduction:

"In every walk of life and in the boards, committees and councils where policy decisions are made, women encounter a glass ceiling when they reach the levels at which influence and authority are wielded. Until women are fully represented at the leadership level of public, professional and economic life, we cannot say that they enjoy full and equal rights.

"UNESCO will continue its task of assisting the educational path of girls as the first and most important step in this direction. Helping to give women and girls access to education, knowledge and skills, employment and decent living conditions is one component of UNESCO’s action in the eradication of poverty, one of the Organization’s crosscutting themes in the Medium-Term Strategy for 2002–2007."
Koïchiro Matsuura
Director-General of UNESCO

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(currently available in English -- version française à paraître)

For more information on ways UNESCO is mainstreaming the needs of women, please follow this link >>>

        
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"Mainstreaming the Needs of Youth"

a BSP publication
with an Introduction by
Koïchiro Matsuura,
Director-General of UNESCO entitled

"Acting with and for young people"

Youth can –and must –make a contribution, and a difference. We need your inputs not only on what to do, but on how to do it: guide us in devising programmes and projects in which there is a space for young people; help us define the possible interface between the activities you undertake with your associations and non-governmental organizations and UNESCO ’s activities. Let us define ways for establishing a real partnership in order to help us open up for young people ’s participation.

For more information on ways UNESCO wishes to empower young people and to encourage the inclusion of youth concerns into the policies of Member States, please follow this link >>>

        
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Mainstreaming the Least Developed Countries

Excerpt from the Director-General of UNESCO, Mr Koïchiro Matsuura's introduction

More resources greater resolve

The situation of the forty-nine least developed countries (LDCs) implicates over 630 million individuals and today calls for more resources and greater resolve as UNESCO fully integrates the special needs of LDCs into the mainstream of its programmes. The situation in some countries is particularly critical, compounded as it is by the devastation wrought by HIV/AIDS, internal conflicts and governance crises. Given their perilous, fragile situation, the LDCs will receive special attention from UNESCO. The Organization has already begun to orient its programmes towards attaining the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) adopted at the United Nations Millennium Summit in New York in September 2000, in particular the goal of cutting extreme poverty in half by the year 2015. Resources, expertise and competence in education, the sciences, culture and communications will be focused into effective interventions and actions, and these will be carried out in close cooperation and coordination with the other partners of the United Nations system, with bilateral partners, civil society and the private sector, drawing on UNESCO’s recently restructured and reinforced network of field offices. The May 2001 Brussels Declaration and Programme of Action for LDCs provides the framework for all these efforts.

In particular, we must devise new educational arrangements and approaches to address the needs of these countries, to promote education in science and technology, to spread technical and vocational education and to use the new information and communication technologies as invaluable tools for reaching out to the educationally deprived. We now have the Dakar Framework for Action, Education for All: Meeting our Collective Commitments, adopted at the World Education Forum (Dakar, Senegal) in 2000. It should be the starting point for all of our programmes in support of the least developed countries.


The challenges are enormous. Without urgent and effective action, the LDCs will plunge even deeper into poverty. But we must be wary of launching over-hastily into uncoordinated, ill-planned and inadequately targeted emergency operations. Each
country must also be able to secure the support of its partners, both ‘internally’, through partnerships with civil society, local communities and the private sector, and ‘externally’, through assistance from multilateral agencies, international and regional donors, bilateral partners and non-governmental organizations. And we must all find a way of participating harmoniously in this great challenge that we have collectively set ourselves. We must learn to make more of our own potential, to work better with and to be more attentive to others.


Koïchiro Matsuura
Director-General of UNESCO

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For more information on UNESCO's actions within and for the Least Developed Countries, please consult the following web site >>> 

     
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28-06-02:

Mainstreaming the
Culture of Peace

'The United Nations and UNESCO were founded to bring about a world at peace. Peace is more than an absence of war. It means justice and equity for all as the basis for living together in harmony and free from violence, now, but even more so for our children and succeeding generations. The General Assembly has designated 2001–2010 as the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children of the World. This decade will provide a unique opportunity to translate solemn declarations and good intentions into reality. We always must renew our shared pledge to attain this goal: a world at peace with itself in a new century and a new millennium.'
Koïchiro Matsuura
Director-General of UNESCO

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To access the Culture of Peace website, click here >>>