Environment and development
in coastal regions and in small islands
colbartn.gif (4535 octets)

Coast and beach stability in the Lesser Antilles (COSALC)

UNESCO
UNESCO/CSI
Coasts and Small Islands

SLIDE PRESENTATION
BEACHES AND HURRICANES: 1995 IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN ISLANDS

by Gillian Cambers, January 1997


University of Puerto Rico
Sea Grant College Program

INTRODUCTION 

This slide presentation was prepared in 1997 as one of the activities of the project entitled ‘Managing beaches and planning for coastline change, Caribbean islands (COSALC) (formerly titled ‘Coast and beach stability in the Caribbean islands’).   This project is supported by the interdisciplinary platform for ‘Environment and development in coastal regions and small islands’ of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and by the University of Puerto Rico Sea Grant College Program

The goal of COSALC is to develop in-country capabilities so that island states can measure, assess and manage their own beach resources within an overall framework of integrated coastal management. 

1995 was the second most active year for hurricanes in the North Atlantic Basin since records began.  During a three-week period, (26th August - 16th September, 1995) one tropical storm and two hurricanes passed through the eastern Caribbean islands, wreaking a path of damage and destruction to the natural and man-made environment. 

This presentation provides a visual record of the damage wrought on the coastal environment, particularly the beaches, and is designed to provide the people of the region with a clear picture of the effects of the hurricanes and an indication of measures that can be undertaken to reduce the impacts of future hurricanes. 

The presentation was produced in 1997 as a set of 59 slides and a booklet describing each slide.
  

SLIDES

Slide 1: Beach activities, Dickenson Bay, Antigua
Slide 2: Coastal vista, Grand Anse, Grenada
Slide 3: Hawksbill turtle hatchlings
Slide 4: Fishing boats, Pinney’s Beach, Nevis
Slide 5: Dune mining, Brighton, St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Slide 6: Beach sand mining, Fond D’Or, St. Lucia
Slide 7: The coastal system
Slide 8: Dead mangroves, Little Harbour, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 9: Dead seagrass, Rendezvous Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 10: Reef debris, Cove Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 11: Damage to the Frangipani Hotel, Mead’s Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 12: Sandpiper Restaurant, Pinney’s Beach, Nevis, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 13: Beach bar, Purple Turtle Beach, Dominica, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 14: Coconut Beach, Dominica, before the 1995 hurricanes
Slide 15: Coconut Beach, Dominica, after the 1995 hurricanes
Slide 16: Damaged sea defences, Tarrant, Dominica, after the 1995 hurricanes
Slide 17: Damage to boats, Sandy Ground, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 18: Damage at Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands, after Hurricane Hugo
Slide 19: Four Seasons Resort, Pinney’s Beach, Nevis, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 20: Four Seasons Resort, Pinney’s Beach, Nevis, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 21: Four Seasons Resort, Pinney’s Beach, Nevis, six months after Hurricane Luis
Slide 22: South Friars Bay, St. Kitts, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 23: South Friars Bay, St. Kitts, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 24: Banana Bay, St. Kitts, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 25: Banana Bay, St. Kitts, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 26: Dickenson Bay, Antigua, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 27: Dickenson Bay, Antigua, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 28: Boulder revetment, Dickenson Bay, Antigua, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 29: Boulder revetment, Dickenson Bay, Antigua, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 30: Fort James, Antigua, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 31: Fort James, Antigua, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 32: Morris Bay, Antigua, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 33: Beachrock at Morris Bay, Antigua, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 34: Barnes Bay, Anguilla, before Hurricane Luis
Slide 35: Barnes Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 36: Fond D’Or Beach, St. Lucia, after Tropical Storm Debbie (1994)
Slide 37: Dune erosion, Rendezvous Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 38: Dune erosion, Maunday’s Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 39: Erosion of coastal lands, Rodney Bay, St. Lucia, after Tropical Storm Debbie
Slide 40: Erosion of tombolo, Scotts Head, Dominica, after several hurricanes (David, Hugo and Luis)
Slide 41: Dune mining, Sturge Park, Montserrat, 1980s
Slide 42: Loss of coastal land, Sturge Park, Montserrat, after Hurricane Hugo
Slide 43: Dune erosion, Mead’s Bay, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 44: Dune mining, Mead’s Bay, Anguilla, 1980s
Slide 45: Villas on reclaimed land, Peter Island, British Virgin Islands, after Hurricane Hugo
Slide 46: Restoration of a sandy cay, Sandy Island, Anguilla, after Hurricane Luis
Slide 47: Conditions at Pinney’s Beach Hotel, Nevis, immediately after Hurricane Luis
Slide 48: Conditions at Pinney’s Beach Hotel, Nevis, eight months after Hurricane Luis
Slide 49: Diagram of beach changes, Pinney’s Beach, Nevis
Slide 50:  Diagram of adequate coastal development setbacks
Slide 51: Diagram of inadequate coastal development setbacks
Slide 52: Shore structures in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands
Slide 53: Concrete steps over dunes, Maunday’s Bay, Anguilla
Slide 54: Wooden steps over dunes, Long Bay, Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Slide 55: Natural coastal vegetation, Grand Anse, Grenada
Slide 56: Sand mining continues after Hurricane Luis, Fort James, Antigua
Slide 57: An inland quarry, Nevis
Slide 58: View of the east coast, St. Vincent
Slide 59: View of Anse Becune, St. Lucia (1979)

 

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