http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/en/state/India

Institutions, organizations, contacts

National institutions

Permanent Delegation of India to UNESCO
Maison de l’UNESCO
Bureaux M1.42/M1.38
1, rue Miollis
75732 PARIS Cedex 15
dl.india@unesco-delegations.org

Indian National Commission for Cooperation with UNESCO
Ministry of Human Resource Development
Department of Secondary and Higher Education
Government of India
Shastri Bhavan
New Delhi 110 001
India
secy.dhe@nic.in (SG); maniverma100@gmail.com

Designated authority for the use of the emblem:

This country did not designate yet any national authority in charge of the use of the emblem of the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

Read more on the use the emblem

UNESCO’s contacts

UNESCO Office in New Delhi
B-5/29, Safdarjung Enclave
New Delhi - 110 029
India
Culture Program officer:
Moe Chiba (m.chiba@unesco.org)

UNESCO headquarters (ICH Section)
Regional officer:
Scepi, Giovanni (g.scepi@unesco.org)

Accredited NGOs located in this country

Name, address and sourceActivities related to ICH
Arunodaya kala mahila mandali
Mugali.katiganere post.Tarikere taluk.
chikmagalore district.
Karnataka PIN 577550
INDIA
Tel.: Ph:91 08261 691096, MOBILE: 919008391337, Number for communication in ENGLISH: 91 98453 90015(Dr.Raveesha.M.R.)

Accreditation request No. 90047: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1997
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
OBJECTIVES OF THE ORGANISATION:
1,SAFEGUARDING AND ENHANCING OUR PREVAILING INTANGIBLE CULTURAL FOLK ARTS.
a,SOBHANE HAADU(FOLK SONGS SUNG PARTICULARLY DURING WEDDING FUNCTIONS)
b,Kolata art: To propagate and teach this art to young hearts.
c,BEESUVA KALLINA PADA::SONGS SUNG DURING GRINDING GRAINS IN THE WEE HOURS.
d,Beladingala songs: songs sung on moonlight days.
e,sompradaya haadugalu:
2,To bring social reforms at village level.
3,To give community health education.
4.To enrich rural women and families in the domain of culture and family values.

Activities:
ORGANISATIONS ACTIVITIES:
1-CULTURAL ACTIVITIES:
a. Regular training workshops for young women and teenager girls, regarding intangible cultural assets of our native propogated arts like folk songs , songs in special occasions of life stages in a sole coloquial, like child birth, naming ceremony , menarchy function, wedding, baby shower, condolence ceremony etc…
b. Participating and conducting competition and youth cultural rallies at different levels like village block, district, state and national.
eg. Song and drama awareness programmes , famous mysore dasara, Doordarshan programmes , 4th national games,janapadha melas(folklare congregation).
c. Training programmes for youth : Every year we have been choosen as a resource person from the stsate of karnataka to train and teach youth .
1. Folk song
2. kolata performance .
d. In assistance of kannada and cultural department ,we have been conducting folklare shows in various places in the department

2-SOCIAL:
All the youths and members of my organisation conduct sanitation camps involving local citizens
In order to help and rehabilitate socially deprived women and orphan children we are bringing awareness programmes in rural areas of our districts.

3-EDUATIONAL:
Education for Elected reprentatives from village levels : so we have been training uneducated panchayat raj representatives with assistance of SEARCH organisation
b. Health education /Awareness programmes : We have been acredited as mahila arogya sanga and we have been composing folk songs on health programmes like HIV/AIDS immunization programmes , malaria, NRHM,JSY,Female foeticide, birth and death registration.

4-ECONOMICAL ACTIVITIES:
a. 30 self help groups have been formed from the womens of the village in order to improve micro savings to bring up economical freedom for a rural women .
b. Through the organisations we have been conducting training programmes on stitching, garment preparations and small scale industries like pottery and making blanckets from sheep wool .

Cooperation:
EXPERIENCES:
1. We have an experience and implementing, co-ordinating ,educating, cultural activities particularly folk music and performances.
2. Our immense knowledge and expertise from our ancestors is flowing through our blood in that we are using the values and morals out of the practically laid down truths of life, corresponding to prevailing life styles and changing values.
3. We have experienced the greatest strength in bringing up family in every dimensions is through the mother.
Hence we are tackling at the right age and appropriately .

cultural assets of our native propogated arts like folk songs , songs in special occasions
of life stages in a sole coloquial, like child birth, naming ceremony , menarchy function,
wedding, baby shower, condolence ceremony etc…
b. Participating and conducting competition and youth cultural rallies at different levels
like village block, district, state and national. eg. Song and drama awareness
programmes , famous mysore dasara, Doordarshan programmes , 4th national
games,janapadha melas(folklare congregation).
c. Training programmes for youth : Every year we have been choosen as a resource
person from the stsate of karnataka to train and teach youth .
1. Folk song
2. kolata performance .
d. In assistance of kannada and cultural department ,we have been conducting folklare
shows in various places in the department
2,SOCIAL::
All the youths and members of my organisation conduct sanitation camps involving local
citizens
In order to help and rehabilitate socially deprived women and orphan children we are
bringing awareness programmes in rural areas of our districts.
3,EDUCATIONAL::
Education for Elected reprentatives from village levels : so we have been training
uneducated panchayat raj representatives with assistance of SEARCH organisation
b. Health education /Awareness programmes : We have been acredited as mahila
arogya sanga and we have been composing folk songs on health programmes like
HIV/AIDS immunization programmes , malaria, NRHM,JSY,Female foeticide, birth and
death registration.
4,ECONOMICAL ACTIVITIES:
a. 30 self help groups have been formed from the womens of the village in order to
improve micro savings to bring up economical freedom for a rural women .
b. Through the organisations we have been conducting training programmes on
stitching ,garment preparations and small scale industries like pottery and making
blanckets from sheep wool .
EXPERIENCES::
1. We have an experience and implementing,co-ordinating ,educating, cultural activities
particularly folk music and performances l.
2. Our immense knowledge and expertise from our ancestors is flowing through our
blood in that we are using the values and morals out of the practically laid down truths
of life, corresponding to prevailing life styles and changing values .
3. We have experienced the greatest strength in bringing up family in every dimensions
is through the mother .
Hence we are tackling at the right age and appropriately .
Bhartiya Lok Kala Mandal
Institute of Folk Arts and Culture
Panchwati, Udaipur
313301 Rajasthan
INDIA
URL: http://www.kalamandal.org
Tel.: + 91294 -2560891

Accreditation request No. 90069: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1952
Budget: U.S.$175000
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- Rural and Developmental communication Training in Folk Arts and Crafts Using Puppetry as teaching tool in classrooms

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- other
- Regular Performances

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Objectives & Functions of the Organization are as follows:
a) Protection, Development and dissemination of traditional and folk art of India through
education.
b) Documentation & research of folk dance, folk theatre and folk art.
c) Presentation of folk dances, theatre in the modern context and technique through
creative interaction.
d) Dissemination of Indian folk lore, folk dance on the wide cultural forums within india
and abroad.
e) To create a museum of folk musical instrument and folk performing arts.
f) Publication of folk lore and related literature.
g) Training in folk theatre, folk arts, folk dances, folk music and puppetry.
h) To build bridges with other cultural organizations world over.
i) To make efforts to encourage and create a wide platform for folk artists.
Activities:
Bhartiya Lok Kala Mandal, a non-commercial registered society, was founded in the
picturesque City of Udaipur in 1952 by late Padamshri Devilal Samar. A great exponent
of performing arts himself, he committed this institution to the preservation and
dissemination of folk lore and folk arts.
From its humble beginning, the Bhartiya Lok Kala Mandal today stands in3000 sq.mtr. of
land and houses a puppet training centre with a puppet theatre, a research and
documentation wing which undertakes research in folk lore and culture, an open air
theatre with 3000 seating capacity and a museum that displays original and genuine
pieces of folk art and craft.
Over 50,000 people from all over the world visit the museum every year. The
performances of dance & puppet ensembles of Bhartiya Lok Kala Mandal have won
world over acclaim, including the first prize in traditional puppetry during an international
festival held in Budapest in 1965.
In addition to the above the institution is also in training children and youth in traditional
art and crafts. Programes community development and mass awarness are also
conducted regularly.
Cooperation:
1. Over the five decades B.L.K.M. has interacted with about 2,000 traditional artists and
craft persons and has decoumented them extensively.
2. The Institution organises training programes for school teachers, school children and
urban artists on a regular basis.
3. The Institute has developed community programmes and awareness campaigns in the
rural area of India. These programmes involve the traditional socities.
4. Over the years the Institution has been successful in developing a vast network of
traditional puppeteers, story tellers, musicians, folk theatre groups and rituals performers
from all over India.
5. B.L.K.M. was a pioneer Institution to reach out to far flung tribes all over India to
document their culture and habitation.
Bhasha Research and Publication Centre
Bhasha Research and Publication Centre
62 Srinathdham Society Near Dinesh Mills
Baroda 390007
INDIA
URL: www.bhasharesearch.org.in;
tribalartsmuseums.org;
www.adivasiacademy.org.in

Tel.: +91 - (0)265 - 233 19 68 - Mob: + 91- (0)987 901 91 30

Accreditation request No. 90236: English
Decision-making meeting: 4.GA - 2012

Year of creation: 1996
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- Indigenous museums

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
As per the 2001 census, the population of indigenous (tribal) communities in India is 84.3 million in India, i.e. 8.2% of the total population. There is, besides, a six crore population comprising communities designated as ‘denotified and nomadic’ tribes. These communities speak a variety of languages. However, of the numerous languages in India only twenty-two languages are recognized by the 8th Schedule of the Indian Constitution. There are nearly ninety-six other languages having at least 10,000 speakers, and nearly 360 languages with less than 10,000 speakers, that are not officially recognized.
Most of the languages spoken by the indigenous communities are not included in the Indian Constitution. Since many of these languages do not have a script and follow an oral tradition, they do not have a documented or ‘written’ literary tradition and are not taught in educational institutions or employed for administrative work. Due to lack of patronage, these languages are under threat of extinction. With the gradual disappearance of their languages, oral culture, traditional knowledge systems and cultural practices, the very social fabric and cultural identity of indigenous communities is under threat. There is no single University, Research Institute or Museum in India that covers all the languages, literature and the arts of indigenous communities in the country. There are in some states Tribal Research and Training Institutes but their area of operation is confined to their respective state boundaries. Therefore, the studies conducted in these Institutes remain inadequate in their scope.
Bhasha Research and Publication Centre was established in 1996 with the aim to provide ‘voice’ to the indigenous communities of India. The activities of the organization are directed towards the following objectives:
1. To undertake documentation of linguistic, literary and artistic heritage of adivasi communities in India and to publish documented materials.
2. To collaborate with national academies of art and literature and research institutes engaged in the art of adivasi related imaginative activity for the purpose of undertaking or encouraging research in adivasi art and literature.
3. To establish a national level Adivasi Training Academy for the promotion of adivasi languages, literature, arts and culture with a view to initiating formal education in the area of conservation of adivasi imagination.
4. To undertake activities related to social and economic development of adivasi communities
5. To stimulate and create awareness among citizens for the preservation of adivasi languages, art and imaginative life of adivasi communities.
Activities:
Bhasha was established by a group of people engaged in the conservation of intangible cultural heritage. These included internationally recognized artist, the late Bupen Khakhar, eminent writer, social activist and Padma Vibhusshan recipient Mahesweta Devi and former Professor of English, renowned literary critic, activist and Linguapax Award recipient Dr. Ganesh Devy.
Many of Bhasha’s networks and 86% of Bhasha’s staff members are themselves from Indigenous communities and are themselves transmitters of intangible cultural heritage so they are incredibly qualified to act in the field. The Adivasi Academy is an educational institution which draws scholars India and abroad to exchange ideas and knowledge with indigenous communities.
Bhasha has established a publication house that documents and publishes books on indigenous languages, society and culture. In 1997, Bhasha launched the Dhol magazine for documentation of oral traditions in indigenous languages. Dhol eventually became a platform for expression of indigenous imagination and came to be published in ten major indigenous languages spoken in western India, none of which had ever been documented before: Rathwi, Dungri Bhili, Panchmahali Bhili, Chaudhari, Garasia, Bhantu, Kukna, Dehwali, Pawri and Ahirani. Due to the impact of the magazine, the number analysis of Census 2001 data on these languages reveals that during the past decade speakers of indigenous languages have increased significantly compared to their figure for 1991.
Indigenous language glossaries have been brought out in fourteen indigenous languages. The glossaries are designed as a teaching aid for non-indigenous teachers teaching in indigenous areas as well as for indigenous children who, due to the influence of formal education, are gradually being alienated from their culture and language. The glossaries are used by the government as educational materials in schools.
Bhasha has set up the Adivasi (Tribal) Academy at Tejgadh, a tribal village 90 kms east of Vadodara in Gujarat state, as a national level institute exclusively devoted to conservation of languages and cultural heritage of indigenous communities. The Adivasi Academy is engaged in rescuing the dignity and respecting the cultural heritage of indigenous communities through festivals, organizing cultural performances, theatre, songs, dances, rituals and documenting folklore. The Adivasi Academy has instituted academic courses such as a Post Graduate Diploma in Tribal Culture and Development, Post Graduate Diploma in Tribal Arts and Culture and Post Graduate Diploma in Himalayan Arts and Museology. Bhasha is recognized as a Special Autonomous Centre by Indira Gandhi National Open University.
The Adivasi Academy has established a museum of indigenous communities at Tejgadh. The museum is called ‘vachaa’, meaning voice or expression. Vachaa functions as a forum for expression of creativity and offers intellectual space to indigenous communities documenting and creating dynamical displays of their expressions, both artistic and cultural, in the form of objects, artefacts, performances and digitized multimedia images. The Museum is seen as the 'laboratory' for contemporary ethnic, anthropological and artistic studies carried out from the perspective of indigenous communities themselves.
On invitation of the Government of Himachal Pradesh, Bhasha has designed a Museum for Himalayan communities at Keylong. For the conservation and protection of Himalayan culture and ecology, Bhasha has set up a national institution by the name ‘Himlok’ in Himachal Pradesh.
Bhasha has created a National Consortium of Indigenous Arts and Culture by digitally linking 14 Regional Indigenous Museums in India. The Consortium is the only single and largest database of indigenous art in India comprising a repository of craft, folktales, short films, oral narratives, songs and stories.
During the past decade Bhasha organized over a hundred conferences, seminars and workshops on indigenous languages, literature and culture. In 2008, Bhasha initiated a series of international conferences named Chotro in collaboration with European Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies (EACLALS). This conference is held annually, and as the term “chotro” implies, is intended to “bring together” writers, artists and scholars interested in the languages and literatures, the cultures and histories of the indigenous peoples of the post-colonial world. So far there have been three Chotros drawing participants from over twenty six countries.

Bhasha has instituted annual cultural festivals:
Bhasha holds the Kaleshwari Cultural Festival in Panchmahals every year that is attended by denotified and nomadic communities who showcase their drama, epics, dance, music and other cultural practices.
On 1st May Bhasha holds a national Conference of Tribal Writers at Dandi.
A Cultural Festival of indigenous communities is organized at Saputara in south Gujarat on 15th October.
Bhasha has now undertaken a Peoples Linguistic Survey of India, a nationwide survey on existing languages across India, which seeks to answer the question ‘How many living languages does India have?’ The PLSI will map languages around India with the help of the speech communities themselves and linguists. This work is being carried out through a series of workshops throughout the country which bring together scholars and cultural activists to complete surveys on eight hundred languages.
Bhasha has impacted the government’s policy in relation to the Denotified and Nomadic Communities. Similarly, the Government of India’s ‘Bharat Bhasha Vikas Yojna’, Ministry of Human Resource Development, was drafted by Bhasha. The scheme is intended for promotion of the non-scheduled and threatened languages.
Cooperation:
The Bhasha centre has developed a close engagement with communities, groups and intangible cultural heritage practitioners in a number of contexts.
Bhasha has had a close engagement with Tribal language groups over time. A network of indigneous writers and thinkers has been established, who regularly contribute to Bhasha’s magazines and publications. There is a network of community teachers who also contribute to magazines, publications and study material in their indigenous mother tongues. Bhasha’s publication work has created a platform for authors from within indigenous communities to publish their works, and has brought to print many previously unrecorded languages and literatures.
The Peoples Linguistic Survey India has established a national level network of language speakers not included in the 8th schedule. Language speakers, linguists, language activists and scholars are all engaged in the project.
Bhasha initiated the establishment of a Tribal Artist Cooperative which provides an opportunity for artists to practice and promote their craft. The Adivasi Academy has and Artist’s Workshop located on site for artists to create and practice their craft. There are 120 members in the cooperative, it is a registered body and is managed by adivasi graduates from the Adivasi Academy. Tribal musicians have been engaged documenting their musical instruments and recording folksongs and instrumental music. Bhasha organizes performances of adivasis artists both at the Adivasi Academy as well as in other major cultural centers throughout the country. These performances contain dance, drama, puppetry, mask plays, recitations of epics and storytelling.
Vachaa, the museum established by Bhasha is a national level Resource Centre for the conservation and promotion of the culture and craft of marginalized communities in India. The staff and curators of the museum themselves belong to indigenous communities, the museum is seen as a forum for the tribal voice.
Contact Base
58/81 Prince Anwar Shah Road
Kolkata 700045

INDIA
URL: www.banglanatak.com
Tel.: +91 33 24 17 85 16

Accreditation request No. 90120: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 2002
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- social communication; community education; rural micro enterprise promotion

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- other
- promoting culture for employment and growth; using culture for innovating new goods and services

Main countries where active:

India

Craft Revival Trust - CRT
S-4 Khirki Extension
New Delhi 110017
INDIA
URL: http://www.craftrevival.org
Tel.: +91-11 29 54 50 15

Accreditation request No. 90066: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1999
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- traditional craftsmanship

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- promotion, enhancement
- revitalization
- Dissemination / Transmission

Main countries where active:

Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives

Objectives:
The Craft Revival Trust (CRT), established in 1999 is a registered non-profit organisation
which works with craft and craftspersons. Craft Revival Trust is endeavoring to build an
information and knowledge infrastructure for the craft sector in South and South-East
Asia. In Craft Revival Trust’s experience. the exchange of information and the
subsequent interaction often carries within it the solutions to many of the challenges that
the crafts sector faces. We believe that free and open access to information is the core
that empowers and strengthens individuals and societies and leads to development.
It is our belief that knowledge and access to knowledge forms the core of growth
societies. one of our key goals is to support endangered cultural, historical and artistic
resources that form the fundamentals of those who are increasingly being marginalized
within the established modern framework.
The objectives of the Craft Revival Trust are
• To research and document knowledge and skills of oral craft traditions and craft
communities that have been transmitted from generation to generation
• To safeguard by creating a knowledge bank
• To create a network of crafts and craftspersons
• To promote respect for craft creativity, craft communities and the hand skills.
• To create a rights based platform for advocacy for the craftspersons.
• To create programs that facilitate and generate interest in the crafts by the next
generation
Activities:
enclosed
Cooperation:
• Weavers of the famed Benaras brocades are facing enormous threats as their
traditional products are copied and faked and sold thereby deriving traditional
craftspersons of their livelihood and creating immense hardships. A movement,
spearheaded by CRT has been initiated to consider what response might be possible for
the future of craft communities and their values.
• Through our various engagements with persons and organizations we realized
that the concerns in the traditional craft and other disappearing and endangered
traditions extends beyond artisans to all communities involved with traditional livelihoods.
Recognizing this, we have worked with wildlife conservationist Bahar Dutt, winner of the
Green Oscar, in the rehabilitation of the Snake charmers of India whose occupation has
been outlawed by the provisions of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. It is an attempt to
transfer their existing knowledge and skills to useful and sustainable methods of earning
a living CRT worked on livelihood rehabilitation program with the Jogi Nath Snake
Charmer community. The one year project culminated in a concert with a 100 snake
charmers. The Chief Guest was the Chief Minister of Delhi. Since then the snake
charmers have received many offers to play at musical events and festivals, giving them
a reasonable livelihood. 2006-2007
• We continue with our ongoing, major long term audience engagement program of
dialogue, debate and discussion that explores issues of cultural diversity, identity and
sustainable livelihoods in collaboration with India International Center.
Titled Putting Ideas First This interactive initiative has sought to encourage debate,
exchange of information and an airing of ideas and issues that exercise us. 2005
onwards
Hands On Craft Revival Trust, over the last few years had regular workshops at large
public venues and in schools where we trained young students to respect the hand
crafts. The crafts taught have included Natural Dying; Recycling and making paper from
waste; Tie dying; Sanjhi paper cutting and jewellery making. Since 1999.
• As a member of the Tuesday Collective have interacted with the Planning
Commission and the Prime Ministers Office on issues related to weavers and
craftspersons. Since 2006
Dhrupud Sansthan Bhopal Nyas
Dhrupad Institute Bhopal Trust
Behind Van Nidhi Nursery
Suraj Nagar
P.O. National Judicial Academy
Bhadbhada
Bhopal-462044
INDIA
URL: www.dhrupad.org
Tel.: 0091.9425006681

Accreditation request No. 90062: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1999
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Indian Music Specially dhrupad music only can be taught only through listening.
Dhrupad is the oldest form of Hindustani classical music. The Dhrupad tradition, a major heritage of Indian culture, has survived largely unchanged until today. The nature of Dhrupad music is spiritual. It seeks not to entertain but to induce feelings of peace and contemplation in the Iistener. The word 'Dhrupad' is derived from DHRUVA, the steadfast evening star, and PADA, poetry. lt is a form of devotional music that traces its origins to the ancient text of Sam Veda. The SAM VEDA was chanted with melody and rhythm, and this chanting was called Samgana. Gradually this developed into other vocal styles calied 'Chhanda' and 'Prabandha' with the introduction of verse and meter.
The fusion of these two elements led to the emergence of Dhrupad. By the eleventh century, Dhrupad music had crystallized into a perfect form, which has retained its original structure and purity through to the present day. One significant characteristic of Dhrupad is the emphasis on maintaining purity of the Ragas and the Swaras.

• Despite a large number of music schools, the way in which the teaching is structured fails to promote excellence. The emphasis is on quantity rather than quality, and teachers are unable to devote enough time and individual attention to students. Mastery of Dhrupad requires sadhana (Practice) , concentrated practice, under the constant supervision of the guru. This is what Dhrupad Sansthan intends to do. Through informal, flexible methods, students will be taught one-on-one. By determining a pace of learning appropriate to each student, the guru will have adequate time and opportunity to demonstrate the subtleties of the music. However, the students will be expected to clock at least ten hours of riyaz (Practice) each day. The Gundecha Brothers are themselves beneficiaries of this rigorous yet elastic system of learning, and are therefore ideally
suited for carrying it on to help create accomplished Dhrupad performers.

The transmission of Indian music (Raga Music) is possible only through LSTENING.

One can not learn at all with the help of only written material. In the other words it is a very much oral tradition. Dhrupad Sansthan is teaching and handing over this great music tradition by this oral tradition to create accomplished performers.

• Besides training in Dhrupad singing, courses are designed to impart extensive training in string instruments Iike Rudra Veena and Surbahar, which derive their form and identity from the Dhrupad tradition, and Pakhawaj, the main percussion accompaniment for Dhrupad vocalists.

• The Institute offers short-term courses of Dhrupad appreciation and organize regular seminars and workshops for music lovers.

• Teaching the practice of meditation and yoga based on Dhrupad is another endeavour the Institute undertakes.

• The Institute aims to document and archive and available information and research about Dhrupad, its iIIustrious history, audio and video reference and resource materials, musical texts and biographies of the legends of Dhrupad.
Activities:
Dhrupad Sansthan is a registered trust promoted by the Gundecha Brothers, Umakant and Ramakant, both well-known Dhrupad vocalists. It was established in 1996 and formally registered in 1999 (No. 1 dated 5 -11-1999) under the MP Public Trust Act, 1951.

A construction plan for the Sansthan has been prepared by eminent architect Ms. Savita and Nilin Raje. The building is situated in Village- Suraj Nagar, Bhopal - five kilometres away from the main city. At present more than 20 students are learning Dhrupad under Gundecha Brothers, where living facility is also available.

The building has about 20000 Square feet build up area with about 3 acre open land.
The Institute comprises a Gurukul, Auditorium, Library, Archives, Office, Living Quarters, Dining Hall and Kitchen. The hostel and guest house have the capacity to accommodate about 50 students at a time.

Dhrupad Sansthan is also registered (Number 063160107) under the Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act, 1976 whereby it is eligible to accept donations directly from organizations and individuais abroad. As a non-profit organization, Dhrupad Sansthan is certified under Section 80 G of the Income Tax Act, 1961. Indian donors are thus entilled to 50% tax deduclion on donations made to Dhrupad Sansthan.

The Main purpose of Dhrupad Sansthan is to prepare accomplished Dhrupad performers. We plan to do it within 4 year course. Till now about 40 students - from India and abroad have taken training from Instilute out of which Ms. Aliya Rasheed (Visually impaired young girl from Lahore, Pakistan) , Ms. Amita Sinha from West
Bengal, India, Ms. Shashwati Mandai Paul from Bhopallndia, Ms. Nageen Tanveer from Bhopallndia, Ms. Florence Morfoisse from France, Mr. Branan Dubb from Australia, Mr. Chris Sprague from Australia and some more are performing professionally on concert stages.

Dhrupad Sansthan has also collected Dhrupad recordings of ail the maestros of about more then 750 hours and have also indexed and transferred it in to digital form.

Dhrupad Sansthan has also recorded and documented the music of Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar ( Dhrupad Vocal) , Pandit Pushpraj Koshti ( Surbahar), Pandit Prem Malik ( Dhrupad Vocal) , Mr. Ken Zuckerman (Sarode) , Pandit Ramashish Pathak (Pakhawaj), Pandit Ravishankar Upadhyaya (Pakhawaj), Pandit Prathviraj Kumar (Pakhawaj) Pandit Debu Chaudhury (Sitar), Mrs. Manju Mehta (Sitar) , Ms. Aliya rasheed
( Dhrupad Vocal) , Pandit Shrikant Mishra (Pakhawaj ), Ustad Bahauddin Dagar (Rudra Veena).

Dhrupad Sansthan has also done workshops of various musician for its students . So far, Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar, Pandit Pushparaj Koshti, Pandit Puru Dadhich, Pandit Prem Malik, Pandit Ramashish Pathak.

At present more than 20 students are living and learning Dhrupad atthe Dhrupad Sansthan for fulltime . This includes many foreigners also.
Cooperation:
Though Dhrupad Music is an Indian music but it has been experiencing that it has attracted a wide audience and students from ail over the world. In fact, it has crossed ail the borders of countries, religion and cultures. The students from ail over the world have shown a great interest in this music. More then 20 students from out of India have taken training of this music so far. At present students from USA, Australia, Japan, China,
France, Pakistan, Germany, Belgium, Estonia, Sweden. You can see details on our website www.dhrupad.org.

Here are the comments from the foreignes - (Experiences of the Students at The Gurukul- Institute).

To my mind, Dagar Bani Dhrupad constitutes one of the worlds' great cultural treasures and I feel extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to study it with such wonderful teachers as the Gundecha Brothers. The work they are doing in creating the Bhopal Dhrupad Sansthan is, as far as I know, unparalleled as far as creating an environment which brings the traditional Guru-Shishya-Parampara system into the twenty first century in a way which welcomes students from many different cultural backgrounds and without compromising the traditional rigour of this teaching method. 1have found the Gundecha Brothers and their families to be at ail times exceptionally generous, supportive and Iiberal with their teaching, their encouragement and their support. 1 wholeheartedly recommend the Bhopal Dhrupad Sansthan to anyone who wishes to study this art form.

Mr. Chris Sprague from Australia

What impressed me the most at first was Gundecha Brothers insatiable desire of spreading and teaching Dhrupad, in it's Pure form. To the point of you forgetting space and time. Your Passion and Love for Dhrupad could be felt through your teaching and has enliven for me that sense of wonder and sacredness for this amazing sacred divine form of Musical expression. At last, but not least: You do not impose your stile to the
students. You adapt your phrasing in accordance to their own self expression and teach us, that way, to be more aware of one own musical tendencies. l'm very impressed!"
Ms. Florence Morfiosse (Shivala) from France

My experience at Dhrupad Sansthan has exceeded ail expectations. We are so fortunate that the Gundecha family is carrying on the traditional Gurukul method of teaching and preserving the art of Dhrupad for future generations. 1highly recommend this school to anyone and everyone who is interested in exploring the music of India, and I feel certain that everyone can experience the joy and spiritual depth of this music here at Dhrupad Sansthan. Ms. Jennifer Melmon from USA

I have come to Dhruapad Sansthan to study music but I feel that around the music there are also many facets of the cultural environment that are transmitted through this intensive traditional teaching method. The Guru-Shishya-Parampara reveals to me the cultural ground from which the music springs thus giving me a much deeper and richer understanding of the music itself. The Gundecha Brothers are very generous in welcoming me and making me a part of their religious, cultural and social functions and celebrations, and for this I feel most fortunate.

Mr. Inoue So from Japan

l'm very happy to be studying in Dhrupad Sansthan. I don't know a better adapted place to learn Dhrupad one of the oldest singing styles, Gundecha Bandhu is doing extremely important work to keep this ancient heritage alive.
Folkland, International Centre for Folklore and Culture
Elambachi
Kasargod District
Kerala 671311
INDIA
URL: www.folkland.org
Tel.: 0091 467 2210699 / 0091 467 2301364

Accreditation request No. 90172: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1989
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Folkland stands for the promotion of folklore with an aim to protect the intangible cultural
heritage falls in the genres such as folksongs, folk theatre, folk dance and other oral
practices along with traditional performances which are in the verge of extinction.lt
seeks to document, conserve and disseminate to the larger audience. Folkland's main
areas are conservation,documentation and transmission of intangible cultural heritage,
research on folklore.lt organises seminars, workshops and festivals to preserve and
promote the traditional art and culture.lt publishes reserch papers, books and
magazines.it btrings together people from India and abroad for artistic engagement. It
also organises dialogues between communities and peoples of different cultural
traditions.Folklad provides forum for artists,scholars in furtherance of the intangible
cultural heritage.Folkland engages in the work that enhances universal values of
multicultrism.Folkland learns inorder to teach the traditional art and cultural practices
and thereby pass on to the coming generation.

Activities:
INSTITUTION PROFILE
Folkland, International Centre for folklore and Culture is an institution registered on
20.12.1989 under the Societies Registration Act of 1860 vide the No 406189.During the
last 16 years it has passed through various stages of growth especially in the field of
performance, production, documentation and research besides the preservation of folkart
and culture.Folkland functions as
(l) An international Centre for folklore and culture
(2) As a Cultural Organization with clearly defined objectives and targets for
research and promotion of folk arts.
Folkland has branched and reached far and wide into almost every nook and corner of
the world. It has strived hard and treads the untrodden path with a clear motto of
preservation and inculcation of old folk and cultural values in our society.Folkland has a
credit of organizing many a festival on folkarts, workshop on folklore, culture, linguistics
etc.Seminars, discussions and symposia are also conducted and thus contributed in the
process of re-kindling the folk lamps, which has shed streaks of light into our past
treasure of knowledge.
Folkland has revitalized the old and extinct art forms like
Chimmanakkali,MangalamKali,Vannankoothu,Kurathiyattam etc with the assistance of
Dept of Culture,Govt of India and Sangeeth Natak Academy, Mew Delhi.Folkland has
veritable collection in the field of folksongs, Folk Art forms,riddles,fables myths etc which
are in the verge of extinction recorder and kept in the archives for scholastic endeavors
and posterity.
Folkland has already conducted workshops on Theyyam Costumes, myths, literature,
tribal arts, Poorakkali, Ethnomusic, folk handicrafts etc.Besides its annual festivals,
Folkland has a credit of hosting 17th Indian Folklore Congress at Trivandrum 23rd to
27th December 1996.
The main activities of Foikland falls under the performance, study and research on
folklore.Folkland has more than 600 Artistes in our roll comprised of Theyyam
,ThidanmpuNirtham, Poorakkali Velakali, Kolkali, Mangalamkali ,Oppana ,Daphu muttu,
Kalaripayattu etc.
Performance
Being the premier organization in the field of performance in the traditional art
forms,Folkland has been invited by several organizations and Departments like Zonal
Cultural Centres of Dept of Culture,Govt oflndia,Dept of Tourism,Sangeetha Nataka
Academy,Tourism Promotion Council and various other organizations
Research
Folkland has initiated several research projects during the last 16 years.Major among
them are Surwey, Documentation and Research on Kerala folklore, Art forms related to
floor-al drawings, fertility cult of Kerala,Different aspects of Theyyam,poorakkali etc.
Museum
Folkland has a museum of Theyyam with major Theyyam forms made in terracotta with
full costumes and ornaments. It has around 100 different facials drawn on the clay pots
and pulp effigies and kept in the museum. Apart from that, it has calendar of events and
a directory of artistes.
Honours
Three of our artistes were awarded for their best performance in the field of folklore by
the Kerala folklore Academy,Govt of Kerala during 2001-2002.
Website
Folkiand has launched a website on Kerala folklore under the domain name
.folkland.org.website was launched by Sri G.Karthikeyan, Hon.Minister for Culture,
Govt of Merala on 18th January 2003.
Award
Folkland has been selected for the State Award for the Best Performing Centre by the
Govt Of Kerala, Dept of Tourism for the year 2001-2002.
Training to the students
Folkland is extending training to 50 students in the field of poorakkali,kolkali,velakali and
Kalampattu.Out of the above students l 1 are getting scholarships from CCRT,Govt Of
India.
Documentation
Documentation of folk music and art forms,rare ritual arts is one of the major objectives
of Folkland. It has more than 3500 hours of folk songs and about 2600 hours of rare art
forms in the audio and video formats. Apart from that 8000 paper clippings and 4300
rare photographs in the archives. Considering the vast work in the field of
documentation,Folkland is made a member of reputed organization, Archive Resource
Community housed at Delhi.
Recognitions and Affiliations
Folkland has been recognized as an eminent Institution by the Dept of Culture,Govt of
India since 1999 and 17 of its artistes and one Guru1 Director have been given salary
by the Dept of Culture.lt has been affiliated to Dept of Handicrafts, Ministry of
Textiles,GOl. Besides that ,Folkland has been affiliated to the Kerala sangeetha Nataka
academy since 1995 and Nehru Yuvak Kendra since 2000.Folkland has become an
Associate Member of ClOFF in the year 2000 and has become the member of ARC in
the year 2000.Folkland has also been recognized by the Department of Anthropology
Norway University for their research pursuits.
Source of Funding
Folkland has been recognized by the Dept of Culture, Govt of lndia and has been
giving salary grants and production grants by the Ministry of Tourism and Culture.
Folkland has also been considered for grants by Govt of Kerala for several projects.
Performance charges and public contributions are our other sources of finance.
Administration
Folkland has governing body consists of a Chairman and Chief Executive Officer as its
head. There are five directors and a secretary to lead the team. Dr V.Jayarajan (Vice President Indian Folklore Congress and Advisor to Sangeeth Natak Academy, New
Delhi) is the chairman of the Governing body and Mr K.Suresh is the Secretary.Folkland
has an advisory board consists of eminent scholars and artistes of international
reputation. Sri Kavalam Marayana Panikker ( Vice Chairman,SNA) Dr. H.K.Bhat (Mysore
University), Dr Jawaharlal Handoo, (President I FC) are the present advisory board
members.
Chapters and Liaison Officers
Folkland has several Chapters in India apart from its regional office in
Karnataka(Mysore) Rajasthan, Assam,Meghalaya,Chatishgarh,Gujarath,
Tamilnadu,New Delhi,Goa,Punjab,Madhypradesh Chapters are functioning well.
Foljkland has Chapters in Saarc countries such as Nepal, Malesia, Bengladesh and
Pakisthan. Folkland has liaison officers working in countries like
France,Germany,Peru,USA.Swedan,Japan,Holland,USSR,UK and UAE
Cooperation:
Folkland has woprked with several communities such as Mavilan, Vannan, Malayan,
Pulayan who are the Teyyam performers and practionioners of Magic, ethno music,
ethnomedicine and crafts.Mangalam kali , a unique pradce performed by a hill
tribe(indigenous community) was revitalised and its artist, a lady performer was given
distinguished membership by folkland when she appears on the media at her age
of100years.Folkland has also conducted her performances at different stages and
became instrumental to bring her state award instituted by Kerala folklore academy.
Folkland has documented around 3000 hours of folkpractces.another work in which
folkland has involved is the screwpine craft. It was undertaken by the women folk of
Pulaya community. Folkland has inspired them to revitalise the traditional crafts and
given training and also extended the insurance coverage to them.Another field in which
folkland involves is the manuscripts.Folkland has surveyed around 200000 palmleaf
manuscripts and started digitization process in order to protect the same. most of the
manuscripts are community based knowledges.
Goa Heritage Action Group
29-30, Green Society,
Porvorim
Goa-403521
INDIA
URL: http://www.goaheritage.in
Tel.: 0832-3252097; 09822128022

Accreditation request No. 90011: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 2000
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- Documentation and restoration of the built heritage of Goa

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- Actual architectural conservation

Objectives:
We work to bring about awareness of our region's man-made and cultural, tangible and intangible heritage properties, sites and circumstances. We strive to do this through nonintrusive and participatory conservation programmes that are based on a respect for local traditions and sensitivities.
We aim to carry out inventories of such properties, sites and zones in our region (Goa, India) so that an archive of intangible cultural properties, sites and knowledge and skills may be built and understood. We aim to place this archive of knowledge in the public domain so that government and public can take ownership of our region's endangered creative traditions and expression.
We believe firmly in working with structures of governance and of community to plan for the conservation of our intangible and tangible heritage, to advocate protective legislation that will enable our society to preserve, document and find apt and respectful contemporary uses for such properties and sites.
We aim to work on a judicious mix of highly visible properties and sites in our region, so as to achieve awareness of our aims and methods, and then to sensitise both the community and the local government to adopt methods to integrate the safeguarding of such heritage.
We are committed to tracing the cultural and social traditions that lead to the rediscovery and rehabilitation of artisans and craftspeople who possess knowledge and skills that are waning or in disuse; we foster the development of teaching programmes that revive forgotten skills and reopen repositories of cultural knowledge. In so doing, our group actively seeks out former centres of such activity and finds appropriate and sympathetic
methods to promote, enhance and transmit their value to society.
We work with existing government and non-government agencies in a spirit of partnership and positive professional engagement. Our focus in such work is to ensure the durability of our cultural traditions in the communities from which they emerged, while aiding the provision of livelihoods to their practitioners, encouraging creativity and fostering adaptation.
Activities:
2000 October : prepared a list of 500 heritage houses at the request of the Government of Goa.
2000 November: Goa Heritage Festival held with lectures, an exhibition on Houses of Goa, skills demonstration by several artists and artisans, performances and interactive sessions on art and culture of Goa and a publication.
2000 December: Registration of Goa Heritage Action Group with Registrar of Societies, state Government of Goa.
2000-01: spread awareness through lectures, media and dialogue with the Government of Goa on conservation issues. Group urged the Government to frame regulations for built heritage.
2001 November: second Goa Heritage Festival held with lectures, an exhibition on Houses of Goa, skills demonstration by several artists and artisans, performances and interactive sessions on art and culture of Goa and a publication.
2002 November: held the Third Goa Heritage Festival to bring awareness on the importance of a historic city neighbourhood.
2003 February: held the first Fontainhas Festival of the Arts in the Fontainhas heritage precinct of Panaji, capital of Goa, where art was displayed in private houses. This was in co-operation with the city municipal corporation.
2003 August: A historic 16th century riverfront cross was restored with technical support from a conservation architect and funds raised from the neighbourhood.
2003 November: published the first number of its annual journal titled 'Parmal'.
2002-03: continued to dialogue with governments on several environmental and heritage conservation issues and continued insisting on the framing of heritage regulations.
2002-03: The list of heritage properties and sites in the state of Goa was further updated with the help of funding from the national body Indian National Trust for Art & Cultural Heritage (INTACH).
2004 February: The second Fontainhas Festival of the Arts held. The festival helped the Group restore buildings and raise awareness on the heritage value of Goan artefacts.
2004 March: A commemorative pillar erected approximately 150 years ago was restored in collaboration with the Panaji municipal corporation.
2004 June: The World Heritage site of Old Goa had its beginnings in a 12th century hamlet. The Group restored the markers of the 1930s used to locate sites of ruined buildings and streets.
2004 October: filed a writ of mandamus in the High Court of Bombay to save a 10th century idol from an ancient temple that was demolished.
2004 November: published the second number of the annual journal 'Parmal'.
2004 November: The third Fontainhas Festival of the Arts - combining traditional intangible heritage and contemporary art in a heritage precinct - was held in Panaji, Goa.
2004 December: Group helped the custodians of a 13th century temple - which contains artistic objects and woodwork reflective of motifs found in the 13th century Vijaynagar empire - find technical solutions for additional space.
2004 December: intervened to save the front façade of a 150-year-old Goan Baroque church.
2005 February: held a learning and organisational workshop for members.
2005 March: completed the compilation of over 1,000 heritage properties and sites in and around Panaji, Goa. The listing was published in collaboration with the Panaji city municipal corporation.
2005 April-December: inventory of heritage properties in towns threatened by rapid urbanisation
2005 November: published the third number of the annual journal 'Parmal'.
2006 February: held a Mission, Vision and Values Workshop for members and associates.
2006 September: Members attended Proposal Writing Workshop
2006 December: filed writ of mandamus against an official land use plan for the state that would have endangered heritage zones and sites in Goa.
2006: Listing exercises continued for North Goa for rural belts under threat of rapid urbanisation.
2007 January: published the fourth number of the annual journal 'Parmal'.
2007 February: the fourth Fontainhas Festival of the Arts - with a lecture series and incorporating folk art and dance - was held in the heritage precinct of Fontainhas-Mala in Panaji.
2007 March: successfully opposed a state government plan to convert the historic Old Goa Medical College building, the oldest medical school in Asia, into a commercial mall.
2007: worked at local level with a village action group to save a natural water body from rapid urbanisation.
2007: took the initiative to begin the study, documentation and restoration planning for six 'kaavi' art temples in Goa. These are privately owned and display the rare and endangered Goan inlay art form (sgraffito).
2007 December: published the state's first heritage map showing heritage homes, churches, temples, mosques, caves, caverns, Kaavi art examples, heritage villages, crafts villages and medieval and pre-medieval ruins.
2008: Listing exercises in the coastal villages of North Goa continues.
2008: Research and documentation of kaavi art temples continues with future focus on restoration.
Cooperation:
The Group's work and the community first combined in the Goa Heritage festivals. We helped bring out their culture and their dances in our festivals - not performances by professionals who did not understand the essence of the dance and the story, but by people who did it right after fieldwork. These are performances of living culture which we found have been distorted in their transition to the city and its consumers. We have found that our approach has helped people make the distinction and helped performers, artistes and their supporters look for methods that retain as much as possible of the original content and context.
For our festivals that focus on skillcraft and indigenous art, the Group works closely with artisans and architectural craftsmen - like potters, carpenters, basket weavers, window makers. These dialogues pertain not only to understanding their craft but also to their social and economic problems, and to why the next generation is not taking up these professions. We have found that craftspeople have the same problems all over India: how to find a market that does not harm the roots of the cultural traditions.
We engage with community at a different level for festivals that combine art and technique in a built heritage zone, as in our 'Fontainhas festivals'. The festivals have brought together people from various streams - artists, artisans, houseowners, city civic workers, musicians and the visiting public. These have successes mainly because the interactions are based entirely on trust, which is continuously renewed by dialogue and consultation.
The variety of ownerships of sacred spaces has proved to be a rich source of community experience for our group. We have had our most memorable successes in communities that have informal structures of stewardship of sacred spaces, and less so with more formalised committees. This has been important, for we have at times met with hostility and suspicion. In all these circumstances, we have found that a continuing dialogue is one based on our recognising early the wide-ranging socio-economic influences that affect our communities.
Him Kalakar Sangam, Shimla
Nand Bhawan (Lal Kothi)
Phagli, Tehsil and District Shimla-171004
Himachal Pradesh
INDIA
Tel.: +91 (0)177- 2835220

Accreditation request No. 90096: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1976
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
The objective of the organization is to preserve and uplift the rich ancient cultural heritage found in northern part ofIndia specifically Himalayas which is at the verge of extinction. The history of the ancient music instruments found here is related back to the ages of Mahabharta and Ramayana which is essentially to be preserved. To expose and explore the ancient music instruments of Himalayas through orchestra and to highlight the professional players of ancient music instruments. To research and identify the communities who have been able to preserve the original music of the region and who claims themselves to belong to the Kinner, Gandharva and Tumru etc. connection with Rishis (Saints) who are said to have spread the music among the masses.
Activities:
The organization has been working for preservation and highlighting of ancient heritage culture of Himalaya's region in the field of ancient music, Folk songs, ritual songs, wind instruments, string instruments percussion instruments, instrument making community, dress making community, temple music and worship system, Lord Shiva and other Deities and idol making communities. Different type of folk dramas with their ancient dresses and jewelry, ornaments etc. with performing techniques to show the performance with audio video recording. Different ancient festivals of deities and others, ancient Archery festivals of Himalayas. The organization since its inception is engaged in safeguarding intangible cultural heritage mentioned above since in the modem days, ancient music instruments which are related back to the ages of Mahabharta and Ramayana some of the Epics in India find no importance. The Organization is making research in preserving the folk stories related to deities. Since this is a vast field in the area of ancient culture, much more is yet to be found and highlighted in difficult terrain of Himalayas in inclement weather.
Cooperation:
Him Kalakar Sangam has been rendering performances in India at various stages and getting interaction with various communities, groups and intangible cultural heritage practitioners. The Chief Advisor-cum-Director of the Sangam has vast experience in the field of music (folk and Indian classical), folk plays, drama and folk drama as he retired from Himachal Pradesh University as Professor from the Faculty of Performing Arts after rendering service for more than 35 years. He is also associated Member General Council, National Academy of Music and Drama Academy (Govenunent of India) as Member of the Advisory Committee on Music and Tribal Arts, Director Himalayan Institute of Perform1og Arts, Advisor, Himachal Culture Heritage, Director Drama and Folk Drama, Dhami Dramatical Institute Dhami, District Shimla, Coordinator North Zone Culture Centre, Music expert in research, paper writer, presenter and books published on the Music and Arts.
Indigenous Cultural Society
2nd Floor Jakhalu Building,
City Tower, Junction,
Dimapur 797112
Nagaland
INDIA
Tel.: 9862000566

Accreditation request No. 90178: English
Decision-making meeting: 4.GA - 2012

Year of creation: 1998
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
•To revitalize unique and fundamental cultural values through developing and promoting cultural values of human society.
•To function all its activities in line with traditional Naga Morung institute model (philanthropic institute concerns in lessons of community living, leadership, discipline, hard work and spirit of services, sports, art, music and health etc.).
•Undertake survey, research and evaluation of socio-economic, culture and religious problems and to publish documentary sources, books, periodical journals, monographs, pamphlets, souvenirs, film, videotapes, audio visual aid and CDs etc. to educate the general public.
•Provide relief and rehabilitation.
•Take up various health programme; family welfare, child welfare and help the destitute, handicapped, victims of unexpected circumstances and calamities, and economically backward people.
•Take up integrated development programme; plantation, poultry, piggery, duckery, cattle, rearing bee keeping, goat, sheep etc. for rural and village upliftment to enhance their income with proper guidance and as per geographically and climatically suitable places
•Run scale industries (small) such as food processing, yarning, dying, and handloom.
•Impart training such as cutting, weaving and knitting, handicrafts, carpentry, computer, mechanical and technical, typing and shorthand, in suitable places i.e. rural, backward and tribal areas.
•Empower women in order to bring them to the level of men-folks and to share equal privilege.
•Take up environment and ecological development activities.
•Promote games and sports among the tribals and others to provide recreational facilities and to bring about social integration.
•Open schools, colleges of different streams, Arts, Agricultural Science, Commerce, Theology and Language and cross-cultural college including adult literacy for the illiterates.
•Open care center and training centers for de-addiction cum rehabilitation, counseling, awareness center, HIV/AIDS, population control, orphan, aged and uncared by providing accommodation for such people.
•Have ecumenical set up in concept and nature in all its endeavors through networking, unity, cooperation, collaboration, and ministry.
•Advocate Human Rights for social justice, through training and motivation of the poor, and to support the cause of the poor before the government and the world community.
•Promote Right of information Act to the masses.
Activities:
I. Language, Literacy and literary programme:
Sümi Naga language course in association with Sümi literature Board, six months basic Certificate and one year advance diploma course is offered. This course is targeted to promote cross culture married couples, children, students, youth, research scholars and masses. So far ninety students in Advance and eighty students in Basic have successfully completed course and serving at different institute. At present 25 students are undergoing Advance course.

II. Cultural Research Programme
Focuses are on: Oral literature; folklore, myths, legend, wisdom sayings. Indigenous Culture: Customs & traditions, agricultural life & activities, festivity and festivals, rituals & rites, habits & diets, indigenous industries and economy.

Cross Cultural Research on Naga customs and traditions is being carried out at selected villages/places for empirical studies. Documentary and tribe affinity analysis programme has begun with seminars and workshop in collaboration with government agencies (NECC). So far two days seminar on Naga Folklores was conducted in Nov. 2007 in collaboration with NEZCC in which 12 Naga tribe participated.

Another research programme on ‘Sümi Naga folksongs documentary’, was conducted ‘at Lazami Sümi Naga ancestral village in February 2008, sponsored by NEZCC. This project has become an eye opener for awareness and promotion of cultural values.
Under this project research on oral narrative is given more importance. Networking with reputed agencies such as Sahitya Akedamy and other regional universities has developed to the level of resource person and participation at research seminars and workshops.
At present research on agricultural activities, festivity and festival are under the process.

III. Documentary & Publication work:
For documentation of oral tradition and promotion of cultural research work the society is also involved in publication work. At present the society has two research booklets in its credit, Sümi Naga work Folksong Songs book and video CD and Sümi Naga folksongs book, and video CD.

Along with the documentation work the society is also engaged in literary work for further promotional work. Thus, publish translation work as well, currently revising Sümi Naga folksongs book and video CD and English version of Naga Folklores. Apart from culture information with a view to promote vernacular literature a book entitled ‘Apostolmi chighi kini shiküka (Didache)’ was also published in 2007.

IV. Religious (Indigenous Theological) Studies:
Nagaland state is the only Christian dominated states in India with 98% of population. Whereby influence of this group of people matters a lot for the growth of the societal life. On examining such contribution and effect ICS felt responsible to initiate some avenue to check such measure. This idea leads us to realize that laypersons are untapped resource of Church and social ministry that weights special concentration. Seeing the growing need of layperson in Church ministry equipping them Biblical and Theological knowledge is encouraged. Hence, to promote built indigenous Church ICS is offering Laity Bible courses in collaboration with TESPRO International UK.: Diploma and Bachelor of Ministry course (in English & Sümi vernacular medium).

V. Human Resource Development Programme
•Personality Development: counseling, career guidance to children and youth.
•Imparting indigenous workable skill training to the unemployed youth, woman and self help groups; Handicrafts: card making, decorative items, wooden, bamboo & Cane crafts etc. Indigenous Arts, yarning, dying and weaving etc.
•Organize different training programme, workshop and seminars on different life issues and impart leadership training to leaders, woman, and youth.
•Act as consultant agency, facilitates technical and non technical trainings to national reputed Institutes for the underprivileged citizens; B.Tech. Biotechnology, B.Tech. Biochemistry, B.Tech molecular, B.Tech (food processing).B.Tech Agri. Bsc Agri., B.Sc Forestry.,Bsc. Nursing, Public Health, GNM. First aid & practical Nursing, Medical Lab tech., MCA, MA folklore studies, and Theological Studies etc. All together 78 students have been facilitated through youth empowerment programme.
•Music & arts: to the underprivileged children.
Western: Piano, Drum & drum.
Indigenous: Flute & mouth organ, Folksong and Folkdance

VI. Traditional hospitality:
1. Public Health: Care and support to HIV & AIDS victims; Mother and Child care; Aged and differently abled person.

VII Social welfare & service;
•Library cum mini cultural museum at present there are 400 members comprising of underprivileged students, researchers, scholars and general masses.
•Tobacco control in collaboration with state Government and National tobacco control Programme.
•Family counseling, technical and faith based moulding.
•Human Rights for deprived, woman and indigenous people, associated with world mountain people’s organization.
•Environment awareness & pollution control
•Asylum
a. Conference Hall (120 seat capacity)
b. Guest room (Double bed)
c. Meditation hall.
Cooperation:
The project begins with a humble beginning. No state or central government nor any private agencies came forward to help neither encouraged. However, with all humility the society began the work. The method adopted for the safeguarding of cultural heritage is fourfold; research, documentation, coding and implementation. This process began with identifying the village community through survey report and analyzing the findings.

Lazami village which is believed to be the first ancestral village of Sümi Naga tribe was then selected for the said project. This village is not only the First Sümi Naga village, but also said to have been where many other Naga tribes ie: Lachepumi and Nethophumi village of Angami tribe, Zülhami and Khutsami village of Chekhasang, Longkumer clan of Ao, Kent clan of Rengma, Lotha, Sangtam, and Yimchungrü tribe are said to be immigrated from this ancestral village.

Their Language spoken is the original unpolluted language of Sümi soil, unlike any immigrant Sümis. Lazami language also has affinity with Chekhasang, Mao, Zeliang, and Rongmei. 80 percent of Sümi Cultural life is still intact, which is comparatively higher and better than any other Sümi villages or Nagas in general. Those integral characters are; language, folksong, folklore, diet, agricultural practices, household items, and furniture etc.

Largest village of Sümi tribe, of 950 household (present 2008 record). Lazami village is rightly a ‘cultural village’. Be it Naga migratory history, village topography, villager’s nature, beauty and scientific art of Sümi language, folksongs, jhum cultivation method, product of agricultural crops and dietary habits of the people, and monument of ritualistic stone platform at Iyinu khel etc. all speaks volume of the same truth. If dreamed of having such an idol Naga cultural village, Lazami village should be the model.

Their cooperation and response to our action plan is immensely contributing a lot. Reciprocal participation is a source of encouragement and growth for our project. Such impact of restoration is even better outside the community people. Their natural goodness instead of being good is the key factor of influencing others to assimilate and restore lost cultural values.
Jaipur Virasat Foundation
E-143, Ramesh Marg
C-scheme, Jaipur-302001
INDIA
URL: www.jaipurvirasatfoundation.org,
www.jaipurfestival.org,
www.jodhpurfolkfestival.org,
www.wonderfulworkshops.org

Tel.: +91-(0)141-2222728; 2222140

Accreditation request No. 90078: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 2002
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- traditional craftsmanship
- Introducing 'culture for development' to school-going children through workshops with traditional artists and crafts people, in consultation with heads of local educational institutions.

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
JVF is committed to drive change that creates increased livelihood opportunities among traditional artists, artisans and local communities – to inclusive growth through creative industries and cultural tourism – to the conservation of Rajasthan’s traditional arts, crafts, knowledge & living culture (the region’s primary tourism USP) and historic environment and – to promote and support sustainable development through establishing Institutions within civil society as checks and balances, recognizing the challenges of growth and governance in India’s young democracy.
JVF pioneers a holistic, cross sector approach to development. It links poverty alleviation, creativity, livelihood generation and sustainable development with the repositioning of cultural resources so they become economic assets, thus protecting traditional knowledge and cultural diversity.

JVF’s objectives synergise with UNESCO charters for the conservation of tangible and intangible heritage, preservation of cultural diversity, and furtherance of cultural and creative industries to alleviate poverty as per the UNESCO Jodhpur Consensus of February 2006. JVF’s international patron is HRH Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, UK. Its festivals are endorsed by UNESCO as “peoples’ platforms for creativity and sustainable development”. Through JVF’s committed action on the ground and five years of hands on initiatives in situ, a coherent programme: Community & Culture for Development has emerged as a potential strategy for inclusive development and conservation at a national level.
Activities:
2002- 2008-Key Activities:

Festivals (Community and Culture) for Development:
- IJVF’s strategy has evolved organically through a mechanism of annual creative festivals and in response to the challenges facing development work through the creative sector in a society such as Rajasthan.
- Jaipur Heritage International Festival: JVF has established India’s first annual city based festival as a citizen’s platform for sustainable development: Jaipur Heritage International Festival (JHIF), as a landmark event of national and international significance. Festival 2007 in January (JVF’s fifth), generated more than 100 million rupees value of positive media coverage. See Festival Report on www.jaipurfestival.org. JHIF transformed itself in 2008 to the Jaipur Literature Festival since the regional government chose to create its own cultural festival within three months of JHIF and the city and region cannot support two international city festivals in one city per year. Jaipur Literature Festival has established its brand identity and is perceived as poised to become India’s leading multi cultural and cross language festival of literature and creative dialogue.
Jodhpur RIFF (Rajasthan International Folk Festival) In October 2007 JVF launched Jodhpur RIFF (Rajasthan International Folk Festival) with HH the Maharaja of Jodhpur at Mehrangarh Fort Jodhpur, as India’s first annual folk music festival to promote and reposition the region’s rural performing arts in the context of global tourism. See ww.jodhpurfolkfestival.org.

Rural Arts for Development:
As a year round activity to seed creative processes among folk practitioners and to give better access worldwide to the state’s traditional music (arguably the state’s richest cultural asset) JVF Rural Arts Programme runs capacity building workshops, supports local village festivals, generates new, contemporary opportunities for performance. See Grant Document from Annenberg

Jaipur Heritage Studio for Development:
JVF has developed an extensive citizen network (JVAV) to promote conservation of the historic walled city of Jaipur, to engage local residents, and to set in motion processes that contribute to improved management of the historic environment:
- In March 2006 a small street, restored by JVF as a demonstration project, was visited by HRH Prince of Wales, international patron to JVF.
- In February 2007 JVF, through its partner agency Dronah (www.dronah.org), completed a Heritage Plan of international standards for the city of Jaipur, commissioned by the Rajasthan State Government.
- In partnership with the state government, JVF is preparing a Heritage Walk in the walled city as a model for the state tourism department to regenerate and promote the historic fabric of the city.

JVF Creative Workshops:
JVF workshops have been developed with craftspeople, musicians, theatre and performing arts practitioners, and children, in the context of JVF festivals-for-development strategy – to build capacity, introduce and promote a change of mind set among traditional practitioners and the general public, encourage creativity to enliven traditional skills, and disseminate program values to targeted constituencies through performance, exhibitions, and the media, at festivals and otherwise.

Creative Education for Children:
Jaipur Virasat Foundation has been partnered by a sister organisation, Creative Learning for Change to deliver programmes into the schools of Jaipur as informal education initiatives. It has prepared and published a resource book Discovering Jaipur – touching on all aspects of the city’s heritage and environment, and targeted for age 10-14 and teachers of this age group.

Through its activities, JVF has engaged many people, across the spectrum of local society, in the ‘heritage’ vision. Through process and activity, JVF has evolved its development model:
- identifying traditional practices, skills and arts that are already part of people’s lives in the region.
- seeking to understand the aspirations of the communities it works with, so as to work with them, rather than for them.
- demonstrating through creative workshops and collaborations new and creative ways of looking at traditions so they can be repositioned to earn their practitioners a better livelihood and so be conserved.
- drawing on a global perspective to bring models of best practice management to its activities.
- using contemporary marketing and publicity strategies, including the mechanism of large scale festivals, to maximise outcomes.

JVF’s approach is ‘ground up’ and its activities are predicated on two key precepts:
Creativity, combined with a capability to deliver tangible products that have a place in the global market, can build a valuable bridge between traditional communities and the modern world, so fostering conservation and cultural diversity.
Artistic/ heritage ‘conservation’ that does not engage local people has limited value in a region beset with poverty.
Cooperation:
JVF recognizes that in societies where severe poverty is still widespread, traditional ways of life and inherited cultural practices will not be retained in the face of an easy promise of modern life – the something better that is offered even in the remotest of rural settlements by market and consumer forces. Development consequently is producing a unidirectional, unsustainable and destructive mode of change which fails to include large sections of India’s peoples and destroys traditional values overnight. To create and offer a counter force, JVF seeks to engage in its vision of culture based development, as many people as possible - local communities, cultural practitioners, administrative and elected officials, people of differing faiths and of every social stratum. To achieve this, JVF creates citizen committees to advise, guide, lobby with government, represent JVF values, meet the media, care for guest visitors, share presentations and inform process and programming decisions, and more. JVF makes public citizen presentations, and holds open days at its office. It catalyses local community celebrations and rural festivals. It revives and gives a contemporary platform to local traditional performing arts. Through the programming of its main city festival, JVF strategically reaches out to all levels of the urban society – by holding concerts in slums, working with community groups and with local cultural groups and creating targeted events for schools and educational institutions, the middle classes and the wealthy, visitors, locals and tourists.

In the urban context of Jaipur JVF has been running an early morning Heritage Walk through a specific locality in the historic walled city, Not having any agenda other than discovering, showing and sharing the traditional cultural life of the walled city, JVF has won the trust and cooperation of local residents and helped them create a Resident Welfare Association to work with local authorities in the management and preservation of their historic city.
It is JVF’s experience when working with economically poor and disadvantaged groups, folk musicians and craftspeople that even the smallest of interventions towards empowerment, dignity and life security, goes a very long way and is met with enthusiasm and cooperation.
Madhukali
'Aastha' B-31
Aakriti Garden
Nehru Nagar
Bhopal 462003
INDIA

Accreditation request No. 90041: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1987
Domain(s):

- performing arts

Safeguarding measures:

- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Preservation, promotion of Indlan Classical Music; encouraging innovation and research in Theory and Practice of same. lnculcating a sense of Integration, equallty and fraternity through group music (choir and orchestra). Madhukali's patrons are globally recognlzed Practioners of Intangible Heritage like Pt. Ravishankar (Sitar), Ustad Zia Faridudddin Dagar (Dhrupad), Pt. Hariprasad Chourasiya (Flute), Pt. Shivkumar Shanna (Santoor), Dr. Smt. N. Rajam (Violin), Ustad Zakir Hussain (Tabla), Shri Ashok Vajpeyi (Poet / orator).
Activities:
Madhukali, started by disciples of Late Dr. Lalmani Misra as an informal group in 1983 and formalized in 1987 strives to document, preserve. promote Indian Classical music and encourage research and innovation. It has organized over 32 events in various Indian towns (Bhopal, Jalandhar, Chandigarh, Raipur, Bilaspur, Bhilai, Lucknow, Khandawa, Sehore, Sagar, Jabalpur etc.) individually and in collaboration with other organizations Iike Sangeet Natak Academy, New Delhi and Ministry of Human Resources, Govt. of India among others. The activities have included:

Traditional lndian Classical Music and Dance Performances. Stalwarts like Late Anand Shankar (Orcehstra), Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar (Dhrupad Vocal), Ustad Abdul Halirn Zafar Khan (Sitar), Pt. Hariprasad Chourasiya (Flute), Pt. Shivkurnar Shanna (Santoor), Pt. Vishwamohan Bhatt (Guitar), Savita Devi (Vocal),
Pt. Debu Choudhary (Sitar), Pt. D.K. Datar (Violin), Late Ustad Shafat Ahmed (Tabla), Late Ustad Abdul Latif Khan (Sarangi), Padmabhushan Rajan Sajan Mishra (Vocal), Padmashree Raghunath Seth (Flute), Budhaditya Mukherjee (Sitar), Late Pt. Jitendra Abhisheki (Vocal), Anindo Chaterji (Tabla), Shahid Parvez (Sitar), Late Pt. Vinay Chandra Moudgalya (Vocal), Krishnaram Choudhary (Shehnai), Late Dr. Gopal Shankar Misra (Vichitra Veena), Late Swami Pagaldas (Pakhawaj), Pt. Ajay Pollankar (Vocal), Uma Dogra (Kathak), Late Shanti Sharma (Vocal), Shubha Mudgal (Vocal) and several established and upcoming artists numbering over 325 have performed before invited audience. Amateurs like Indian Ambassador to Azarbaijan, Shri Jyoti Swaroop Pandey too have been presented.

Formation of Madhukali Choir and documenting choral rendition of ancient and modern Indian poetry. The primary objective is to encourage Indian youth towards Indian classical music, poetry and develop a sense of universal Integration. It is the endeavour to bring Indian Classical Music from being an individual activity to becoming a group one. The choir constitutes 20 - ta 25 singers and about half a dozen musician at any given
time. The age of singers varies between 18 to 40 and about eighty percent remain with choir for 2-3 years. A few choir members have been with Madhukali Vrind since inception. The choir is empanelled with Indian Council for Cultural Relation. Over three hundred singers have belonged to Madhukali choir; some are now established singers like Gundecha Brothers, Shobhana Pradhan, Sulabha Saraf, Sandeepa Pare, Nanu
Gurjar, Kirti Sood, Uma Korba etc. Recordings of Madhukali Vrind are avai/able in12
Compact Discsl Audio Cassettes. It has given over 100 stage presentations in about 12 Indian cities. Compositions of ancient poets like Tulsidas, Surdas, Kabir, Meera are traditionally sung but those of Brahmanand, Thakur, Padmakar and modern poets like Jayshankar prasad, Suryakant Tripathi Nirala, Maithili Sharan Gupta, Makhanlal Chaturvedi, Hazariprasad Dwivedi, Balkrishna Shanna Navin, Nazir Akbarabadi,
Subhadrakumari Chauhan and conternporary ones like Nagarjun, Shrikant Verma, Ashok Vajpeyi, Kedarnath Singh, Muktibodh, Agyeya, Sorndatt have been presented for the first time. Madllukali thus has represented a blend of best in language and music.

Training and Forming choral groups in schools; bringing several such choirs to perform together on a single stage. In 1984 a record number of students - 5000 in all presented songs at Ravindra Bhawan, Bhopal on 11th August. Tile concept of choirs has been firmly established in schools of Bhopal and some other towns.

Organizing discussions, symposium on various aspects of Performing Arts. Madhukali with collaboration of other organizations has initiated dialogue on various aspects of Contemporary Indian Music and Dance.

Instituting Awards to encourage talented youth. Each year a young performer in the age group of 15-16 and 17-35 in vocal, instrumental and dance is felicitated with Sangeetendu.
Dr. Lalmani Misra Award.

Cooperation:
Madhukali has organized over 32 events in various Indian towns (Bhopal, Jalandhar, Chandigarh, Raipur, Bilaspur, Bhilai, Lucknow, Khandawa, Sehore, Sagar, Jabalpur etc.
ln collaboration with such organizations Iike North Central Zone Cultural Centre, Allahabad, South Central Zone Cultural Centre, Nagpur, Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya (a Post Colonial Museum), Bhopal, M.P. Sahitya Parishad Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh Urdu Academy, Kalidas Academy, Bharat Bhawan, Govt. of Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh Sangeet Natak Academy, Shruti Mudra, Sagar, OMENAD, Indore.
Meera Kala Mandir
Meera Kala Mandir
Hiran Magri
Sector-11, Udaipur
INDIA
URL: www.meerakalamandir.com
Tel.: 91 294-2583176

Accreditation request No. 90133: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1955
Domain(s):

- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Objectives:
(ii) To Popularize them through Stage Performance and Ballet.
(iii) Progress development of classical Art, Music and Dances through Educational wing.
(iv) To Perform Music, Dance and Nritya-Natika before Society on the songs & Philosophical life of saint Meera in beloved memory ofLord Krishna.
(v) To do Research work on Meera's literature for publication & Publicity work.
(vi) To keep Balance between Rural Art & Urban Artistic Culture and to develop/enhance them through Arty & Culture activities.
(vii) To develop Centers for Music college for imparting Music Education.
(viii) To develop Cultural sense & interest in society through cultural programs.
(ix) To Prepare & Produce Nritya Natika, Documentary photos etc. on the life of Saint Meera Bai.
(x) To open Museum at Meera Kala Mandir to preserve safeguard collection, survey-work on Rajasthani folk Arts and Perform them on stage for publication/publicity and revival them.
(xi) To develop 'MEERA DHAM' Project for tourists commg from various parts of India & abroad.
Activities:
Meera Kala Mandir IS a prestigious Art and Cultural institute established by Nrityacharya Shri Prakash Verma, Founder-director, Actor, Producer, Controller in the year 1955 in Udaipur, Rajasthan state ofIndia. The Institute is registered & recognized by Govt. of Rajasthan at State level, Ministry of Art & Culture, Govt. of India level and affiliated with Sangeet Natak Academy, Jodhpur & Delhi. Meera Kala Mandir got well name & fame not only at State or National level but it has been awarded several Awards & Certificates for representing India in Rajasthani Art & Cultural programs in folk dances, Dramas, various Nritya-Natikas at international folklore at France & Spain.
Shri Prakash Verma with his team of more than 22 Aritists given a Cultural & Art performance in CIOFF of France, A world renowned folk festival (Montignac Festival) in the year 1994 and also performed his Rajasthani folk art in Spain too. Mr. Prakash verma has profound knowledge of stage as Art-Director, Producer & Actor in the institute. Meera Kala Mandir was established with the object to preserve and
promote folk Arts through stage and giving Art & Performances, Documentaries, Research works on Saint Meera's life, publication and imparting knowledge/education through its own Meera Music college. About 100 unique compositions of classical and folk-dances, dramas and Belle are produced and staged by highly experienced more than 20 Male & Female Artists. Meera Kala Mandir IS unique Art & Cultural institute fully devoted for the development of performing folk arts and propagating Indian folklore traditions for the last 55 years. Its Patters, founders, and life members are the high dignitaries ofIndia. Meera Kala Mandir is internationally renowned institute, mainly conducting: (i) Meera Research center (ii) Meera Music college (iii) Meera Performance - training center (iv) Meera Memorial Museum, and now taking lead towards Meera Dham Scheme.
Cooperation:
Meera Kala Mandir being an Art & Cultural institute headed by Shri Prakash verma, a well known Nrityacharya, Sangeetagya, Founder-Director/Art Director, Producer, Actor & able Administrator in institute since last 55 years Who is f"l1ly dedicated to this institute who has given birth to this institute, Nourished it and brought to this stage & gigantic tree - Vat-vraksha & given a glorious name & fame in India & abroad. This he could achieve only due to his cool, co-operatives attitudes, able-guidance, good skill as trainer, high profound directions, proper planning & coordination as trainer, maintaining harmonious relations with his co-artists, other similar cultural institutes, NGOs, Government officials and at large public in general. Meera Kala Mandir is well doing its activities in i) Meera Research center ii) Meera Music college iii) Meera Performance-training center iv) Meera Memorial Museum. In all the centers qualified, highly educated, professional artists are doing their hardworking and fully devoted to this institute. Institute is also pay full attention on tourists who comes to visit Udaipur from all parts of India and abroad and for tourist evening stage programs and for tourist evening stage programs are arranged for them.
The Institute could achieve all the above just to keep good relations with (i) Individuals (ii) Various groups (iii) Societies (iv) Various NGO (v) Govt. officials and (vi) Public at large.
National Folklore Support Centre
No.508, Fifth Floor, "Kaveri Complex"
96, Mahatma Gandhi Road, Nungambakkam
Chennai- 600034 Tamilnadu
INDIA
URL: http://www.indianfolklore.org
Tel.: +91 44 52 13 84 10

Accreditation request No. 90101: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1997
Budget: U.S.$10000
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- other
- public programs and building digital community archives for local culture and knowledge

Main countries where active:

India

National Folklore Support Centre is a non-governmental, non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of Indian folklore research through education, audio-visual documentation, building community digital archives for local culture and knowledge, public programming events, webcasting, publications and organizing seminars and symposia.
Natwari Kathak Nritya Academy
G-7, Ayodhya Apartments, 9A
Manoramaganj
Indore, MP 452001
INDIA
Tel.: 0731 2490133

Accreditation request No. 90015: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1989
Domain(s):

- performing arts

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
• To conduct regular Kathak Dance classes from 1st year to post graduate standard in traditional manner according to the syllabus of Akhil Bhartiya Gandharva Mahavidayaalaya Mandal
• To provide guidance to young researchers in the field of Indian classical dances.
• To work at grassroot level & lay a wholistic foundation for young dancers in preparation for vocational training in Kathak Dance.
• To produce or arrange for productions and choreographies for presentation in various festivals and communication media
• To organize workshops, seminars, appreciation courses, lecture demonstration, etc to inculcate interest in classical dance forms specially Kathak.

Activities:
Our academy is registered body under MP government Society registration act 1973 No. 44 with the registeration number 03/27/03/07787/04 dated 18 june 2004. Income tax department, government of India, has also provided facilities for donor under section 80 G of IT Act 1961 by order number.CIT-1/IND/TECH/80G/25/08-09 dated
21st July 2008. Its PAN card number is AAAA3473B.

Cultural department of MP government has sanctioned a grant of Rs. 48000/- for activities of this academy in 2006-07. Ministry of culture , Government of India has provided a production grant of Rs.50000/- to the founder of academy, Dr Puru Dadheech, for producing a dance drama-“Chandalika” in the year 2005-06. In the same manner , a grant of rs. 70000/- has been sanctioned to the director of academy, Dr Vibha Dadheech for producing the dance drama- “Shabri Gatha”

Academy is regulary organizing cultural programs, workshop,etc apart from its teaching works. In its lifespan of 19 years, academy have achieved an important place in the field of classical dance. At present , 40 selected students are learning Kathak Dance in different classes of the academy and till now 15 student have completed post graduation and 45 student have completed their graduation in Kathak Dance with excellent marks.
In this 19 years span 8 students have been awarded Ph.D degree and 3 students are doing the research works under the able guidance of the directors.


Cooperation:
The academy has been consistently co- operating with communities, groups, and cultural heritage practitioners and we are pleased to say that we are getting generous
support from them as and when required.

We are affiliated to A.B.Gandharva Mahavidyalaya Mandal, Mumbai; Ministry of culture, Government of India; Department of Culture, MP Government; Kalidas Academy, Ujjain, India; Emerald Heights international School, Indore; Abhinav Kala Samaj, Indore and all the reputed dancers and musicians of the country.
Regional Resource Centre for Folk Performing Arts (UDUPI)
MGM College Campus, Kunjibettu
UDUPI - 576 102
Karnataka
INDIA
URL: http://www.udupipages.com/home/culture/r
rc.html

Accreditation request No. 90020: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1983
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- Folk medicinal practices, folk games and study of ethnic groups like tribals, certain castes etc.

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- other
- Textualization of oral narratives

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
The RRC is an NGO attached to the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial College at Udupi, as a part of its cultural outreach with documentation, dissemination and archiving of the folk performing arts (to include folk performances, folk theatre, folk rituals, folk games, folk medicinal practices) of the Karnataka State of India as its objectives with the ultimate aim of promoting and preserving the folk art forms of different regions of Karnataka most of which, unfortunately are vanishing.
The RRC also aims to promote research by providing free access to its archives and library to scholars working on folklore themes, and also to provide the services of its research guide to those desiring to do doctoral research through this organization which has affiliation with two Universities in the State.
Publication of books on folklore themes and topics by researchers or noted scholars is also on RRC’s agenda.
Activities:
RRC has recorded and textualized a few of the songs and dialogues relating to spirit worship, oral epics and folk narratives of the region pertaining to folk heroes, folk deities etc. which till recently were being passed on from generation to generation in certain families by word of mouth. The RRC thereby has helped data safeguarding and preserving in electronic media and books such as oral epics.

The Regional Resources Centre for Folk Performing Arts, (RRC as popularly known) Udupi, is a unit of the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial College, Udupi. It was founded in 1983 at the instance and with the support of the Ford Foundation and with the concurrence of the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial College Trust, Udupi. The nongovernmental, non-profit organization is dedicated to the documentation, dissemination and preservation (by archiving) of folk performing arts, folk rituals, folk games and other cultural aspects of the folk of the Karnataka region. Slowly, but steadily, the RRC built up a network of scholars willing to help it to conduct
field operations in remote areas, thus generating abundant material for its archives, which presently houses a rich collection of documented audio, video and photographic material pertaining to various genres of performing arts like songs, dances, rituals, including forms of tribal lore. Reviewers from the donor institution and discerning scholars, national and international, have appreciated and admired the systematic
collections and computerized methods of information accession. A four-phased workshop organized in the years 1988 and 1989 prepared a group of well trained researchers at the Post-graduate and the Post-doctoral level, what with famous American folklorists like Alan Dundes, Peter J. Claus, AK Ramanujan, Stewart
Blackburn, Philip Zareelli, Brenda Beck etc. collaborating with Indian scholars of repute. This experience helped the RRC to collaborate with the Nordic Institute of Folklore in launching a Finnish-India Project of intensive fieldwork, thus enriching its collections. The RRC operations have been acknowledged as a most productive 90020 - Regional Resources Centre for Folk Performing Arts 3 enterprise in the field of folklore and folk performing arts. The Research fellowships instituted by the RRC have paid rich dividends in most cases towards the building up of the archives and also in terms of folklore study and analysis. Quite a few of them have resulted in publications by the RRC. The RRC has so far brought out 31 publications on diverse folklore themes based on the materials supplied by the researchers and other individual scholars.
The RRC also undertook the laudable project of educating the common people about the value of the cultural heritage, which they possess, and the need to preserve it lest it should be eroded by the forces of commercialization and vulgarization, which result from lack of proper understanding. By organizing dissemination programmes in schools the younger generation could be exposed to this treasure of culture and by organizing them in communities the common men could be persuaded to cease to look upon their own cultural heritage as useless fossils but to regard them as priceless inheritance. Edited versions of many video recordings have been prepared by the researchers of the RRC which serve to enrich the knowledge of the people about forms of culture which they have not seen so far in their own surroundings. Coastal Karnataka and its hilly regions have a few distinctive groups of tribals whose society is undergoing significant changes. Their cultural aspects were scrutinized, investigated and analyzed by RRC researchers. An elaborate study of the serpent worship by the Mera community, called Kadyanaata, was undertaken and was
published in a volume after extensive documentation. The study and documentation of the life styles of Konkani speaking Kudubis and Kharvis was also carried out under a special grant from the HRD Ministry, Government of India. Kodavas, being a special community of the Kodagu (Coorg) district with a rich heritage
and tradition, RRC conducted a series of documentation trips recording the life styles, customs, rituals and dances of the Kodavas. RRC has conducted documentation camps in different parts of Karnataka as well for
the video documentation of various rituals, folk dance forms, folk healers etc. reflecting the culture and traditions of the people of the different districts. For comparative study and analysis RRC has conducted documentation programmes in the border districts of the neighbouring States as well Publications are an extension of the dissemination programme and the RRC concentrated in the last few years on publications on Yakshagana (See under Yakshagana). RRC has published 45 books so far. They represent the basic research in folklore, oral epics, folk rituals, theatre, puppetry and other topics.

During the past ten years, more than 80 researchers from 18 countries (Belgium, Canada, Costa Rica, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, The Netherlands, Switzerland, Tanzania, UK, USA, Venezuela, Korea) visited RRC and most of them were introduced not only to the collections in general but also to materials relevant to their own research topics. For the period 1984-2007 about 750 serious users of our materials have been listed. If one adds to this certain exhibitions of materials at home and abroad plus travel by members of the staff to domestic and foreign workshops, the national and international impact of the RRC is to be deemed satisfactory.
Cooperation:
RRC has to solely depend on folklore scholars, temple authorities etc. of various regions to identify performers, folk artistes, folk narrators and other persons and contact them. There has been almost whole-hearted cooperation from these groups while carrying out documentation of performances, rituals and also interviews. Only in exceptional cases certain groups prefer to be a closed society and may resist documentation of their lifestyles, particularly relating to their beliefs, rituals and social customs.
Sanskriti Pratisthan
C 11, Qutab Institutional Area
New Delhi 110 016
INDIA
URL: http://www.sanskritifoundation.org
Tel.: +91-11 26 96 32 26

Accreditation request No. 90019: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1978
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- Traditional and contemporary arts; Museums of Everyday Art, Indian Teracotta, and Indian Textiles; Artist Residency Program

Safeguarding measures:

- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Sanskriti Pratishthan is a non-profit organization, which has been working towards cultivating an environment for the preservation and development of the artistic and cultural resources not only of India but of the world as a whole. The belief in the positive function of culture as a universal and unifying force is intrinsic to Sanskriti. Sanskriti Pratishthan helps in creating a better understanding of different cultures through the sharing of art, ideas and life experiences; offering visibility to indigenous traditional arts and artisans, crafts and crafts-sons; perpetuating and strengthening cultural roots of the emerging generation world over; and encouraging young people with potential, to pursue meaningful projects in arts and culture. These objectives of the foundation have been achieved by various programmes namely: the coveted Sanskriti. Awards and Fellowships which is given to young talent in different fields; Sanskriti Kendra, a cultural center reflecting diverse facets of India's vibrant pluralistic culture; Museum of Everyday Art of India, Museum of Indian Terracotta, and Museum of Indian Textiles; the Residency Program - India's first International artist and writers retreat, that hosts artists, writer, scholars and creative people from all over the world; and Sanskriti Yatra : a program of cultural orientation for young people.
Activities:
Sanskriti Pratishthan was founded with a view to help nurture some of the most essential elements of India's heritage. It sees its role as that of a catalyst in revitalising the artistic and aesthetic sensitivities of the Indian people. In the last two decades, Sanskriti Pratishthan has established the coveted Sanskriti Awards which aim at inspiring and honouring young talent in India, striving to attain excellence in their chosen fields, and are also awarded to those who have already demonstrated their mettle in their respective disciplines. The purpose of the awards is to strengthen the awardees' confidence in their own capacity and strength, and to emphasize that they are not alone and unheeded in their endeavor. The Sanskriti Awards are given in the fields of Literature, Journalism, Art, Music-Dance- Theatre, and Social and Cultural Achievements. Sanskriti Kendra, a centre reflecting diverse facets of India's vibrant pluralistic culture, is a symbol of Sanskriti's involvement in activities relating to art, craft, literature, the performing arts, and social work. Sanskriti Kendra has emerged as a congenial working space for individuals engaged in sustained creative endeavor. It is a seven acre complex redolent with plants; three unique museums of everyday art, Indian terracotta, and Indian Textiles; residential studios & artists lounge; conference facilities; a library; an amphitheatre; a ceramic centre; a conservation lab; an art gallery; and computers & communication facilities. The Museums of Everyday Art, Indian Terracotta and Textiles are a conduit for the preservation and presentation of indigenous heritage, craftsmanship, aesthetic functionality and cultural practices. Sanskriti's vision is to build upon its collections and to transform its Museums into a central resource hub for all research on the art & craft traditions of India in general, and particUlarly in its core areas of terracotta, textiles and everyday objects. The Sanskriti Museums and their spaces also play a pro-active role in dissemination of information and creation of awareness amongst children, students, artists, scholars, designers and the interested pUblic. The objective of the Conservation Lab at the Kendra is to maintain museum objects and restore art-works. It is well equipped with a special storage and a fumigation chamber. It carries out both preventive and curative conservation on the objects. Sanskriti has also created India's first international artists and writers' retreat with its Residency programme that hosts artists, writers, scholars and creative people from all over the world, where they can reflect, interact, and create.
Cooperation:
For the last three decades I Sanskriti has been working towards cultivating an environment for both the preservation and furthering the development of artistic and cultural resources. As an institution our watchword has is to conserve and perpetuate a tradition that is vital.Towards this Ithe Foundation has been regularly inviting craftsperson's from various regions of India to demonstrate their skill under the crafts demonstration programmes. Number of workshops, seminars, conferences in collaboration with various Institutions/practitioners in the field of Handicrafts are being regularly organized. Also as a part of the Sanskriti Awards scheme there is a category of arts, which also includes crafts persons and recognizing people / institutions working for the cause of keeping the intangible heritage from decaying and sustaining the arts practices. Workshops and Seminars which bring together craftsperson's and designers and international experts to sensitize people towards the relevance of Handicrafts and also include crafts demonstrations and the development and design of crafts around the museum collections which touch the lives of hundreds of artisans and give them new technology and design inputs into their handicrafts practice. In the 15 years of the existence, the Kendra has hosted several persons from creative communities around the world. More than 20 of these have been deeply influenced by Indian crafts and have tried to incorporate the indigenous skill and knowledge base into their production. This kind of spontaneous exchange has a deep impact on the capabilities of the craftsmen who have benefited and also the artists who become ambassadors for Indian craftsmanship overseas. Sanskriti has also organized Design and Technical Development workshops on various indigenous crafts. In addition two international workshops were conducted with grants funded by the Government of India:
1. International Workshop on Basketry craft where international designers were invited to work alongside local crafts persons from India.
2. International Jewellery workshop.
Besides, Sanskriti has constantly been networking with other like-minded organizations like Dastakar, Delhi Crafts Council, Delhi Blue Pottery and others in collaborative efforts and providing facilities for workshops, exhibitions and related activities.
Souparnika Kalavedi
Athazhakunnu (PO) Kottali
Kannur 670016
INDIA
Tel.: +0497-2747505 - 9495209302 (mob)

Accreditation request No. 90117: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 2003
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education

Main countries where active:

India

Tamil Nadu Rural Art Development Centre
101, Jawans Building, West Veli Street,
Madurai 625 001
Tamil Nadu
INDIA
Tel.: +91-45 22340601; 91-98 42148423

Accreditation request No. 90068: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1987
Domain(s):

- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events

Safeguarding measures:

- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Objective of the Organisation:
a) To promote and develop the rural folk arts.
b) To ensure and protect the original form of the folk arts of Tamilnadu, and develop the same by involving the community, groups and individuals.
c) To protect the traditional art forms from alterations and modifications of modern era.
d) To develop and to preserve Tamil culture through the folk arts.
e) To raise awareness through cultural programs at local, regional and national levels of the importance of the intangible cultural heritage and ensure the cultural appreciation in the country.
f) To promote Tamil folk arts by conducting certificate and diploma courses, among schools and college students.
g) To conduct cultural events, seminors and youth festivels among students and enhance their participation in developing folk arts as a skill.
h) To promote literature on folk arts.
i) To promote Tamil rural folk arts among the people of other Indian states.
j) To start and promote the rural folk arts institutions.
k) To safeguard the intangible cultural heritage.
l) To work for the welfare of the folk artists and help them to avail the existing facilities in the region.
m) To participate in the national level competitions and cultural programs and get the recognition of the talented artists from government and cultural organisations.

Activities:
The organization was founded by the highly motivated youth who worked for the institutionalization and proper recognition of the filed of education as folk art in Tamilnadu with an objective to impart cultural skills to young boys and girls in an educational environment in a formal school setting. In his endeavor, he received fullest cooperation and support from the district administration and named after Tamilnadu Rural Arts Development Centre headed by the Commissioner of Madurai Corporation. Prior to this, it was functioning as a non registered body in the name of “Institute of Folk Arts and Dances” since 1987. Then it got its legal registration in the year 1991 and it is the first institution with proper syllabus on folk arts in its kind.
During those days, it was imparting “Master Craftsman Training” course which was then converted as institutionalized Training on a particular Trade “Folk arts”. This paved a way to coin a course curriculum and imparted with a certificate and diploma through the government sponsored programs called TRYSEM by DRDA. Thus it has started with a vision to impart trainings on folk arts and later developed its area of functioning with conducting Festivals and seminars on folk subjects regularly and participate in programs of local, state and national levels.
BROAD CLASIFICATIONS OF OUR ACTIVITIES:
1.TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT.
2.CONDUCT FESTIVALS AND SEMINARS.
3.PARTICIPATE PROGRAMS AND EVENTS.
4.EXTEND AND FACILITATE TO OBTAIN WELFARE FACILITIES / AWARDS TO THE FOLK ARTISTS.
5. ORGANISE THE FOLK ARTISTS TO PROTECT THE ART FORMS.

Major activities:

1. Conducting certificate courses and trainings on folk arts among village youths on the folk arts on the land of Tamilnadu.
2. Disseminate and make aware of the public on intangible cultural heritage of Tamilnadu i.e. the folk arts of the land through festivals and seminars.
3. Recognize the folk artists through awards to encourage their talents on intangible cultural heritage of Tamilnadu.
4. Help the individual artists to obtain the grants and aids to procure music instruments and art materials.
5. Extend and help to get the welfare facilities available from the government such as “ house patta” i.e approved free land to construct house, free music instrument, art materials, identity cards, membership subscription to welfare board, loan facilities-bank linkages etc.,
6.Train the aspiring individuals on the folk art and help them to earn their livelihoods ( obtained certificate of appreciation for this initiatives from the district collector).
7. Conduct part time training programs to school and college going students on folk arts and thereby imbibe them with cultural consciousness and involvement.
8. Participated every year since 1994 in national Communal Harmony and national integration- cultural programs organized by Government of India with folk artists consisting 25 in a team and received awards every year.
9. Take the culture of Tamilnadu to different states of India since 1990.
10. Participated actively with 1250 artists in South Asian Federation Games in the year 1995 at Chennai and performed the folk arts during opening and closing ceremony which was appreciated by the government.
11. During the 8th World Tamil Conference at TANJAVUR, we participated with 1000 artists and disseminate the folk arts of Tamilnadu.
12. We participate regularly the Inter State Cultural exchange program at national level and take our folk art to different levels which in turn protect the dying and intangible folk arts of the nation.
13. This art could be developed only when those artists are protected with a regular livelihood as they does it as a traditional trade and occupation. In order to keep these artists with the same interest, we have had initiated many other welfare services which has been discussed at the above points and thus retain the growth and interest in the minds of the artists.
Through these activities, we ensure and protect the intangible cultural heritage of Tamilnadu and develop the sense of responsibility of every Indian and culture lovers as a whole.
Cooperation:
Its experiences cooperating with communities, groups, and intangible cultural heritage practitioners;
Since its formation as a rural folk art development centre, it has been doing many Yoeman services to the traditional folk artists and their family especially while organize them under one roof and promote them in a climate where there is a gap between modern arts and traditional arts. In fact most of these traditional arts such as “OPPARI” which is a folk song that will be sing on the occasion of death in rural villages. The organization’s head Mr. Somasundaram ( KARAGAM ) dancer whose educational background and experience in working with these artists and the folk art, realized the need for document it as it could not be gathered once the old aged singers’ life time. Similarly, he has the vision to develop the folk art as a educational branch of Tamil folk lore, he gave much importance to the protect the intangible folk arts and culture from the influence of modern life style. It is a very precious art and it has to be protected and kept informed and imparted to those of the youth whose interest is also on the lines with the national interest. His experience while organize, work with and facilitate the role as an artist, mentor, developer and promoter, he feels that he has had done a considerable contribution to the art through his NGO which is exclusively work for the cause. The CBOs (member organizations of folk artists of different parts of Tamilnadu) that are developed and promoted by him are the best examples of his work in the field which in turn directly and in some aspects indirectly promoting the intangible cultural heritage of the Tamil folks. The organization which is widely accepted by the particular community people who are the so called folk artists of various kind as a promoter, protector and educator whose personal social and cultural life is predominantly affected by lack of education in 99% of the cases and ignorance of the social life. These artists are in need of constant help for their personal ( in their respective art ) socio-economic and political life as they are from lowest strata of the community and lack leadership. Our intervention to empower them in self sustenance and make aware of their children on importance of education and their traditional art which is giving rebirth to the intangible cultural heritage of the land. Our artist are always very cooperative and member of our Tamilnadu Rural Art Development Centre since its formation and ever growing in numbers in Tamilnadu. Thus, the art and its originality will be taken to next generation too through our education, training and continuous support to the folk artists.
Vrinda Kathak Kendra
292 Rachna Nagar
Bhopal 462023
INDIA
Tel.: +91-755 4260123 - Mobile no.+919425005631 ; +919893037766

Accreditation request No. 90079: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 2000
Domain(s):

- performing arts

Safeguarding measures:

- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
Objective-Kathak is one of the most diverse performing arts among Indian classical dances.It originated in the medieval period around 15 and 16 century and has immense diversities in it.The variety in kathak becomes more fascinating due to its richness in styles and shades of presentation. We have number of gharanas and schools interpreting the different forms of it in different manner.
The objective of our organization is to develop revive and propagate the activities for protecting, promoting and preserving the cultural heritage of kathak in its intangible form. To strive for the Sustainable development of this masterpiece which reached its lowest ebb in last five decades due to cultural banishment and was being practiced in near oblivion. The endeavour is to bring the like minded artists together and take this dance form to common masses and to gather support and popularity to save the richness of this performing art. which is the intangible heritage of the humanity.
Our aim is to make this dance form an integral part of school education and to inspire the children and young talents to learn kathak and provide them the required training and facilities so they can adopt kathak as their vocation.Our purpose is to create awareness among people about the cultural heritage of kathak and instill in them the sense of pride for promoting the cultural activities through public participation.
Our goal is to conserve and protect the dance form in its pristine, unadulterated and conventional form and to discover the lost links which vanished when the dance form was in exile so that vacuum created could be fulfilled.We seek to coordinate with other organizations and agencies which are involved in the protection and promotion of kathak and other dance forms and organize to make the consultative forums which will suggest measures to make the conditions conducive for the advancement of the dance form.Our objective is to seek support from the government and build consensus for infrastructural support and to pursue the govt. to organize more and more programme for the advancement of this art form and to come out with more platforms and scholarships so that children and young talents gets attracted to embrace this dance form.

Activities:
Reviving cultural dance form is a gradual process in which getting mass participation is an achievement itself. As any long journey begins with single step, the first step towards this endeavor was taken way back in the year 1985 which the founder president of this organization started getting training for this performing art while she was just 10 years old. Her love for dance surpassed everything else so she was selected for scholarship by M.P. Govt.
She has been recognized for her innovative, collaborative and traditional works in technique, rhythmic understanding and ability to improvise with speedy rhythms and subtlety & delicacy of movements. She is renowned artist of kathak dance had first performance overseas at Festival of India in USSR organized by Government of India.She got scholarship & fellowship in Kathak Dance from Govt. & Master’s degree in kathak with Merit (Gold-medal) from Indira Kala Sangeet University Khairagarh, Chhattisgarh, India. Thereafter she visited as a solo performer in many cities of India and abroad. By blending the style of Lucknow and Jaipur Gharana beautifully, in her style she evolves a refined, forceful and sophisticated classical kathak form which is based on fast speeds, swift intensifying turns, and mind thrilling percussive footwork, delicacy of movements and impressive expressions of divine thoughts with clarity, precision & spontaneous maneuvers to live music.
She has in abundance in the classical field passion, this passion translates into hard work, high emotion, flawless movement lines, impeccable timing, perfect grass of rhythm which is very much visible in form of exuded amazing energy and enthusiasm on stage coupled with unflagging stamina and a feel of Abhinaya( Drama )in her performance of kathak.
The president V.Anuradha Singh performed at various heritage sites including the sites which are in UNESCO's Heritage list like Agra and Golconda.
The organisation's founder president along with other artists have performed at various places in India and its various fedrating units at various stages like:
Khajuraho Dance Festival (Madhya Pradesh),Kalidas Festival, Nagpur (Maharashtra) Rajasthan Day Celebration (Albert hall, Jaipur),International Taj Festival (Uttar Pradesh), Ellora-Ajanta Festival (M.S.),Virasat Heritage Festival(Dehradun),Pune Festival (M.S.),Lucknow Festival (U.P.), International Buddha Festival (Gaya, Bihar),Island Tourism Festival (Andaman & Nicobar),Navraspur National Dance Festival (Karnatak),Ganga Festival, Varanasi(U.P.),The Festival of Chandigarh, Uday Shankar Dance Festival (Kolkata),Udai Shankar Dance & Ballet Festival (Jaipur),India International Centre (New Delhi),Ustad Allauddin Khan Sangit Festival (Maihar, Madhya Pradesh),Maharana Kumbha Festival, Udaipur (Rajasthan)Kathak Festival Jaipur Rajyotsav - Chhattisgarh Foundation day, Khairagarh Festival (Chhattisgarh),Bhoramdeo Festival 2 times (C.G.),Badri-Kedar Festival (Uttaranchal) Classical Dance Festival (Goa),Chakradhar Festival, Raigarh (C.G.),Golconda Music and Dance Festival (Hyderabad, A.P),Saraswati Prasang Festival ,Bharat Bhavan Bhopal and many more which are beyond the scope of the space provided.

Cooperation:
Her philanthropic determination is evident from the performance which is specially arranged for gathering fund to provide relief to Tsunami victim natural disaster that occurred in India in 2005.Other activities of organization includes free of cost training centers at 3 different places and providing them scholarships to groom the children and young talents in becoming dexterous in this performing art and motivating the others to embrace this dance form. The organization is concerned for the have-nots and organizes regular training camps at SOS(Save our Soul) which is the world's leading NGO, where the special vocational training was provided to around 60 students from this orphange.Our organiation in coordination with WIN(women inernational network which constituted under the national charity under the central Act 1882) has organised classical kathak charity performance at New Delhi.The organization regularly coordinates with the Govt. at national and state level to pursue them for organizing in pan India various programmes like Saraswati Prasang(Bharat Bhawan,Bhopal),Patanjali Yoga Festival(New Delhi).She has been awarded & felicitated with Wakankar Samman,Kala Manishi Samman & Rajiv Gandhi National Unity Award for unwaivering dedication in promoting & protecting the cultural heritage of kathak and for cooperating with communities and groups for the same.
Young Mizo Association
Tuikhuahtlang
Aizawl
Mizoram
INDIA
Tel.: 91-0389-2322869

Accreditation request No. 90065: English
Decision-making meeting: 3.GA - 2010

Year of creation: 1935
Domain(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Safeguarding measures:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization

Main countries where active:

India

Objectives:
The Young Mizo Association(YMA) has three broad objectives as follows:
1. Useful occupation of leisure time
2. All round development of the Mizos
3. To cherish good christian life

Besides, the YMA has one maxim i.e Helping the needy.
For the realization of these objectives, the YMA is involved in constructive activities ranging from local community sanitation to lobby and advocacy at policy level. As it is a voluntary organisation, to meet its objectives, all efforts and activities are carried out on voluntary basis by its members whether in Branch, Group, Sub Hqrs., or Central levels. Its Apex body, the Central YMA designed the guidelines for the activities and function of the various levels. Each YMA member is instilled with the spirit of volunteerism so that where every he/she may be, can contribute to the welfare of mankind and society.

In dispensing its maxim, the members contribute his/her maximum efforts in helping the poor and the needy voluntarily and it is not only voluntary organisation in nature, hence may be called a community based organisation because of the tremendous roles it played in the society. With the tuning of time and change in trends, the YMA too take initiative with innovation yet keeping alive its objectives and philosophy. Each member can take initiative and call upon the YMA to support his initiative provided it is legal and promotes the welfare of the people.
The YMA is not a rigid organisation but draws its strength and scope from the community itself. The regional community itself determines what the YMA should be. Micro, mezzo and macro level of intervention is possible in such instance when the macro problems such as disaster etc arise in the state. Whenever macro intervention is planned, a separate committee is set up in order to look into the matter and guidelines, if needs, have made in consultation with every known professional in the field ( e.g Forest, education, health and sanitation etc. ). This has led YMA to attain professional attitude whenever intervention is being prepared.
One notable thing is that the YMA does not expect any return for the work they performed or rendered. But have managed to combine professionalism with charity, self sacrifice and this has made it possible for development to take place in the society. In fact it is unique in character and rare in the roles it played.     


Activities:
The brief description of the activities of YMA are as follows :

a) Education : The YMA opened Adult education centres all over the state and it has been the chief architect in developing the literacy rate of Mizoram to over 88.86 %, only second to Kerela in the whole of India. Awareness programmes are often organised to aware the general public of the importance of education . The YMA signed Memorandum of Understanding with the Shirva Shiksa Abhiyan ( Education for All Programme ) to promote education in the state. Beside, The YMA has over 420 public libraries all over Mizoram.
b) Afforestation : Green Mizoram project has been taken up by YMA since 1974 and seasonal afforestation programme in the form of tree plantation is taken up by YMA branch/Group during the month of June every year since then. YMA became the integral part in afforestation of Mizoram and voluntarily safeguarding the environment since 1974. It worked hand in hand with the State Forest & Environment Department in preventing forest fire in the state.
c)Preservation of cultural heritage :Conservation of Mizo culture in particular and Indian culture in general is the primal effort of the YMA in the midst of globalisation and westernization. Each year, in the month of March, in collaboration with the Art & Culture Department, Government of Mizoram, the YMA organises the colourful traditional festival Chapchar Kut where men, women and children experience their ancestral practices. In anticipation of this festival, the YMA organises folk dance competitions as well as folk dance classes for its members. To keep alive traditional music and dances, YMA often organise inter Branch/Village competitions from time to time and distribute certificate and cash award. The YMA use the opportunity as a platform to educate its members and the people on traditional wisdom and philosophy.
d) Village upliftment : Voluntary construction of houses for the rural poor has been a continual initiative of YMA. There are two types of construction - the first is that if somebody in a village cannot construct or reconstruct his/her own house, members of YMA would assist in constructing their house. The other is the houses constructed by YMA on its own or community land. These houses are being maintained by YMA and used for accommodating the poor and needy families on a free rent basis. YMA members in the rural areas are called upon to voluntarily clear the foot paths leading to Jhum areas, community ponds, springs and public cemetery.
e) Cleanliness drive : Since inception, the YMA has constructed 2500 public latrines and urinals in the towns and villages of Mizoram. The YMA asked its members and community members to clean the drains and roads on need basis. With the emergence of new disease and illness, the YMA call upon its members to fight the spread of HIV/AIDS, TB, Malaria etc. YMA organise and facilitates this process through workshop, seminars, print and electronic media both at grassroots and state level. In associate with government bodies, awareness campaign are organised in Group YMA Conferences and YMA General Conference mostly held in the month of October every year.
f) Narcotic trafficking and abuse: The years 2005,2006,2007 and 2008 has been declared as Year of combating Drugs and its abuse due to high incidence of death due to Drugs. It coordinated action and shared information with local and state authorities vis-a-vis known offenders, trafficking hot-spots and indenfy vulnerable individuals and areas,documented existing and potential drugs users and abusers. Each YMA Branch has a guiding principle to maintain peace and tranquility within their own area/branch. Mizoram, being located at a drugs trafficking route with rising incidences of deaths among youths, the task of rural policing is done by the YMA members and took initiative on war footing to combat the supply. To fulfill the Theme of the year, statewide campaign against such social evils were organised and hundreds of illicit traffickers were caught and handed over to the authority.

Special activities : Among the activies of YMA, the special one has always been helping the poor and needy. Whenever somebody died, the YMA members would make all necessary arrangements in the house, they would normally organise a minimum of three consecutive nights consoling the bereaved family. Digging of the graves and burying the dead body is done by the YMA members on voluntary basis in consonant with the custom and tradition of the Mizos. All YMA Branches possess essential utensils, wooden benches, PA System, Shovels, Jumpers and other necessary tools to be used in times of death, funerals, disaster, wedding, festivals etc.

Awards and rewards :
YMA has been awarded National level recognitions such as:
1. Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Award of 1986 by the Government of India
2. Indira Gandhi Paryavaran Puruskar 1993 by the Government of India.



Cooperation:
Conservation of Mizo culture & heritage (Tribal Welfare) is the primal efforts/undertaking of the YMA is the midst of modern influences and globalization. To this effect, the organization cooperate in a spirit of mutual respect with communities, group & individuals to create, maintain and transmit intangible cultural heritage.

-YMA being the largest NGO’s with around 4 lakhs members out of a total population of around 10 lakhs touches the lives of all the Mizos. It has branches all over Mizoram (764 branches). Each branch has a committee on cultural.Thus YMA works from the grass root level, involving each and every community where everyone has a sense of responsibility to safeguard the rich cultural heritage of the Mizos.

-YMA also works in harmony with the Government to preserve, protect and revitalize intangible cultural heritage by jointly organizing different events.

-YMA with Art & Culture Department, Government of Mizoram organizes the traditional festival’ Chapchar Kut’ where men, women and children experience their ancestral practices. In anticipation of this festival, which falls in the month of March, YMA organizes folk dance classes for its members. This has been an annual event since 1972.

-YMA with the support of Art & Culture department, Government of Mizoram organizes traditional dance & folk song competition, distributing certificates and cash awards for its branches- both at the city and the villages. The competition involves all communities thus promoting and transmitting its intangible cultural heritage. This has been an annual programme since 1995.

-YMA has its own cultural troupe made up of members from different communities who perform arts at various places, both within and outside Mizoram. Through the showcasing of the beautiful Mizo cultural heritage by

-YMA cultural troupes, the Mizo culture has been transmitted to over parts of India.

-YMA also trained some of its members as master trainers who in turn gives training to other members with special importance given to the younger generation. Training has also been given through the distribution of films. This helps in safeguarding the Mizo cultural heritage to the next generation.

The biggest gathering of young people is usually organized by YMA. YMA takes this opportunity to spread the need for safeguarding Mizo intangible cultural heritage, using it as a platform to educate the people on traditional wisdom and philosophy.