http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/fr/état/États-Unis d'Amérique

Institutions, organisations, contacts

Institutions nationales

Délégation permanente des Etats- Unis d’Amérique auprès de l’UNESCO
U.S. Mission to UNESCO
American Embassy
12, avenue Raphaël
75016 PARIS
ParisUNESCO@state.gov

Commission nationale des Etats Unis. pour l’UNESCO
Department of State
2121 Virginia Avenue
Suite 6200
Washington DC 20037
United States of America
DCUNESCO@state.gov; wrightas@state.gov (SG)

Autorité désignée pour l’utilisation de l’emblème :

Ce pays n’a pas encore désigné d’autorité nationale chargée des questions liées à l’utilisation de l’emblème de la Convention pour la sauvegarde du patrimoine culturel immatériel

En savoir plus sur l’utilisation de l’emblème

Contacts UNESCO

Siège de l’UNESCO (section du PCI)
Responsable régional :
Scepi, Giovanni (g.scepi@unesco.org)

ONG accréditées situées dans ce pays

Nom, adresse et sourceActivités relatives au PCI
American Folklore Society
1501 Neil Avenue
Columbus OH 43201-2602
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE

Demande d’accréditation n° 90110 : anglais
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 1978
Domaine(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection

Objectifs:
The objectives of the American Folklore Society are to stimulate and encourage interest and research in folklore in all its aspects; to aid in the dissemination of the results of such research; to promote responsible application of such research in the broad variety of settings in which folklorists work; to publish and distribute publications, reports and journals; to serve as a bond among those interested in the study of folklore; to advocate for and assist the teaching of folklore and the establishment of folklore curricula and programs at all age levels in all educational contexts; to enhance the professional well-being of the Society’s members; and to engage in such other activities as are consonant with the foregoing purposes.
Activités:
The American Folklore Society:
1. Publishes the quarterly Journal of American Folklore, begun in 1888 and one of the oldest and most respected folklore journals in the world, which publishes the results of folklore research conducted throughout the world
2. Produces an annual meeting each October that brings together more than 700 folklorists from around the world to exchange work and ideas, and to create and strengthen friendships and working relationships
3. Maintains the AFS web site as a means for communication among Society members and between folklorists and the world at large
4. Serves as the hub of our diverse field, developing means of communication and offering professional development opportunities not offered by other organizations
5. Prepares position statements and policy documents on a variety of cultural, educational, and professional issues, as part of an ongoing program of advocacy for traditional cultural expression and the work of folklorists
6. Supports the work of 6 committees and some 30 interest-group sections
7. Awards prizes, travel stipends, and other forms of recognition and support for outstanding work and best practices
8. Maintains active partnerships with other societies in the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Humanities Alliance
9. Takes a leading role in national and international folklore projects, such as the H-Folk international folklore scholarship listserv and the development of an ethnographic thesaurus, and in international deliberations concerning folklore, intellectual property, and intangible cultural heritage

Coopération:
For many years, our Society has cooperated in several ways in a spirit of mutual respect with communities, groups, and individuals that create, maintain, and transmit intangible cultural heritage.

We provide financial support to enable a number of community-based artists, performers, practitioners, and scholars to attend our annual conferences. We give significant places on the programs of those conferences to those individuals, and to the communities and groups they represent, to discuss their traditional cultural expressions as well as the issues that face them as they seek to maintain and transmit their intangible cultural heritage. For example, at our 2007 annual meeting in Québec, representatives from a number of Canadian and US First Nations and other indigenous communities took part; in 2008 in Louisville community scholars and practitioners from African, African American, and Appalachian communities; and at our 2009 annual meeting in Idaho we will sponsor sessions featuring representatives from Latino, Native American, Basque, farming, and ranching communities throughout the western US.

We have an ongoing committee (the American Folklore Society Cultural Diversity Task Force) that works to bring such community-based representatives into long-term membership and active participation in our Society.

We also provide technical assistance grants throughout the year to communities and groups to support consultancies, meetings, and other activities that will help them pursue their intangible cultural heritage documentation and preservation efforts. Projects we have supported include efforts by indigenous artists to protect the supply of plant items that are essential to their craft traditions, and gatherings of traditional cultural leaders of immigrant communities to discuss means of effectively preserving and transmitting their intangible cultural heritage in their new homelands.

Since 2002, the Society has also been an accredited NGO member of the World Intellectual Property Organization's Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge, and Folklore (IGC-GRTKF). In that body we cooperate with other culturally based NGOs, including those representing particular indigenous communities, on meeting presentations and other activities of mutual interest.
Center for Traditional Music and Dance
32 Broadway, Suite 1314
New York, NY 1004
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: ww.ctmd.org
Tel.: +1-212 571 1555

Demande d’accréditation n° 90003 : anglais
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 1968
Domaine(s):

- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- Publications: audio & vidao recordings, written publications

Pays principaux d’activité:

États-Unis d'Amérique

Objectifs:
Founded in 1968, the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, one of the US'premier traditional arts organizations, is dedicated to maintaing the vibrancy of the performing arts traditions of ethnic and imigrant communities through grass-roots community organizing, research-based educational programming and public performances.
Activités:
Since its founding in 1968, CTMD has produced over 900 major presentations including concerts, festivals, tours, CD and fim series, and lectures. Materials gathered by CTMD staff, folklorists, ethnomusicologists and community cultural sepcialists are the basis for subsequent articistic presentations and educational programming. CTMD-produced recordings, publications, and documentary films preserve and document cultural traditions and educate the public about the rich artistic heritage of New York's diverse immigrant/ethnic communities. Annually serving more than 100,000 artists, immigrant/ethnic community, and general audience members, CTMD's programs have a positive impact to ensure that the artistic traditions, which define a commuity, continue to exist and have contemporary meaning for successive generations. Activities include:

- Community Cultural Initiatives - multi-year field research and presentation projects which help community and cultural activists, artists and educators within targeted immigrant/ethnic communities to preserve their cultural traditions;

- An-Sky Institute for Jewish Culture -a partnership with New York University, the JCC in Manhattan, the Workmen's Circle and the Center for Jewish History to research and revitalize the practice of traditional East European Jewish performing arts;

- Masters on Stage -ongoing partnerships with major intitutions (i.e., Linclon Center, New York Historical Society, American Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Institution) that are designed to introduce leading practitioners of New York's rich immigrant expressive traditions to wider audiences;

- New York World Festival -a biannual event devoted each time to a different region of the worls. Celebrating New York as the most culturally diverse city in the world, the festival acknowledges the vitality of immigrant and ethnic performing arts and their contributions to the New York City landscape;

- Touring Artists -a fee-based program designated to promote community -based artists and assit these artists access mainstream performance venues and media;

- Archives/Dissemination -over the past thirty-five years, through extensive fieldwork and research, the Center has assembled one of the largest collections of urban immigrant and ethnic music anywhere in America. The collection includes audio and video recordings, photographic documentation and related ephemera on CTMD's presentations and programs. Sound and video recordings are published through CTMS's Ethnic Heritage Recording Series and the Global Beat of the Boroughs series in partnership with Smithsonian Folkways. A monthly eNewsletter provides news, events and informatin about NY's traditional music and dance scene.

CTMD's programs and intiatives help build the cultural infrastructure within immigrant/ethnic communities by bolstering immigrant/etchnic artistic traditions within the communituy and introducing these time-honored and continually evolving traditions to larger, more diverse audiences.

Coopération:
Through its innovative Community Cultural Initiatives (CCI) program, CTMD has worked in partnership with artists, educators and traditional arts advocates to conduct multi-year research, documentation and presentation programs in a number of New York City-based immigrant groups, including the Albanian, Arab, Dominican Irish, Indo-Caribbean, Central Asian, Chinese, Phillipino, Peruvian, Soviet Jewish, Ukrainian, Mexican and West African communities. While CCIs are deeply grassroots and NY-based, they produce ripples that can extend nationally and even internationally. In the 1970s, CTMD's project to document and present Jewish klezmer music helped spark a workd-wide revival. In the 1980s, CTMD helped form the renowned all-women's ensemble Cherish the Ladies which ispired huge interest amongs women across North America ane even Ireland in performing Irish music (previsously a male-dominated activity). In the 1990s, CTMD was the first organization to introduce Indian Bhangra music to the US. And, in the last five years, CCIs have generated the first Mariachi academy on the East Coast as well as the first Peruvian music and dance school for youth in the US.
Living Cultural Storybases Inc. - LCS
Bases des Histoires Culturelles qui Vivent
c/o Community Development Institute
321 Bell Street
P.O. Box 50099
East Palo Alto, CA 94303
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: www.storybases.org; www.cdi-usa.org
Tel.: +44 1293 775021 ; 650.327.5846 ext 302

Demande d’accréditation n° 90156 : anglais
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 2006
Domaine(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- other
- The digital linking of minority cultures' intangible heritage, such as indigenous knowledge, storytelling, poems songs and music, to craft work, antefacts or produce (ie to their tangible heritage)

Pays principaux d’activité:

Canada, Éthiopie, Mali, Pérou

Objectifs:
Indigenous peoples represent less than 5% of the world’s population, but more than half of humanity’s cultures. Yet they are the poorest and most disenfranchised. Already one language dies every 10 days. Within 50 years over one half the world’s cultures will be gone: cultural diversity is disappearing much faster than plant or animal diversity. We face a cataclysmic loss of millennia of wisdom and knowledge on a planet threatened by megacity monocultures, economies of scale, environmental destruction, greed and an increasing gap between rich and poor. We all need their understanding of fragile environments, custodianship of biodiversity, unique models of cooperative living, alternative approaches to education, health and well being, skills, artistry and ancient wisdom.

Storytelling transmits the essence of any culture, encapsulating deeper beliefs, values and identity, inspiring ways of behaving and believing. For indigenous peoples, stories also teach practical skills and artistry, transmit custodial knowledge of biodiversity and how to live in fragile environments.

LCS nurtures the oral heritage of minority cultures by developing respectful methodologies, accompanied by empowering novel, yet appropriate digital technology solutions. We aim to exploit networking and cheap, low-power digital audio devices to enable indigenous communities to share and celebrate their traditional stories, poems or songs, stimulating a cultural dialogue with community members dispersed across great distances or now immersed in an urban cash economy.

Specifically, LCS helps minority communities build evolving digital repositories in their own language of their cultural narratives and knowledge, i.e. ‘Storybases’. Our pilots in Peru and Mali prove that training of young agents to record their elder’s stories and the resulting community digital resource, empower the community, strengthen cultural identity, pride and social cohesion, reconnect the generations, create new cultural and economic opportunities and strengthen their proud voices in the global society.

Unlike anthropologists who have recorded vanishing oral legacies, our approach assists these communities in keeping their own languages, values and traditions alive in a changing world.

Links: www.storybases.org http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHB-yMoDhYo
http://tambobamba-lcsandes.blogspot.com/

(Note: CDI's mission is to incubate strong community-based organizations that promote quality of life and self-determination in underserved communities, e.g by providing fiscal agency)

Activités:
ACTIVITIES
LCS aims to support living networks of spoken stories, poems and songs for the communities themselves to celebrate, share and re-interpret their cultural knowledge in the changing world. By providing simple, cost-effective technological tools in conjunction with methodological and educational support, LCS hopes to reconnect dispersed communities and the urban diaspora to embrace and re-interpret their traditional narratives, strengthening their cultural identity across the generations.

The results of our pilot work over the last two years have proved our concept and methodology in two entirely different contexts: Quechua-speaking mountain communities in Peru and Tamacheq-speaking nomadic Tuaregs in the Saharan desert of Mali.

In Peru, more than 20 Quechua communities were involved in the LCS program, over 60 voluntary students were trained, recording >200 stories from >80 storytellers, 50 of which were edited and placed in 4 local community exhibitions. More than 30 radio broadcasts have been created by the Quechua team itself and a very high-profile exhibition was given in Cusco, as part of the 11th International Congress of Ethnobiology. See http://conversationsdumonde.blogspot.com/2008/07/expo-cusco-lcs.html and http://tambobamba-lcsandes.blogspot.com

In Mali, LCS built a local team in Timbuktu, collected over 100 stories, and created a unique locally-relevant project vision. Stories in Tamacheq with photos were recorded from: several camel expeditions to expert storytellers in remote desert encampments, in the Timbuktu town, and from ‘Talking Manuscripts’, ie local-language readings of their written heritage, viz. the libraries of ancient manuscripts. These were catalogued, selected and digitally edited. Timbuktu students were trained in respectful protocols to ensure Full Prior Informed Consent and in professional digital story capture. A women’s group collected a special set of stories for urbanized/Diaspora Tuareg children. Our work in the challenging Timbuktu environment was been presented at a much-celebrated Soiree of master storytelling- the first in this fabled city for centuries- and at the first multimedia exhibition the region has ever seen, not to mention over two radio stations. See http://storybases-tamacheq.blogspot.com

LCS has started creating technology innovations specifically adapted for indigenous populations and oral cultures, e.g. ‘Talking Cultural Objects’ and ‘Touchscreen Talking Portraits’, first realizations of potent technology opportunities. Specifically, we prototyped in Peru two innovative digital devices: the voice-message touchscreen for linking generations around local-language stories in a multimedia exhibition and ‘Talking Weaves’: a new way for adding value and meaning to craftwork for promoting a minority culture’s identity and heritage to outsiders.

The LCS methods are very flexible, and have proven successful for two minority oral cultures with widely differing historical, religious, geographic and lifestyle contexts. In short, the LCS vision and mission is unique and successful, and seems scalable and replicable.

COMPETENCE and EXPERTISE
Field work is always staffed as far as possible by the community itself. The LCS co-founders bring grass-roots community-empowerment experience and knowledge of intangible heritage:
• Paul Rankin ( UK )
Paul was the social entrepreneur and technology architect behind a win-win enterprise, 'Voices in Your Hand', providing an appropriate form of digital inclusion for illiterate or disadvantaged people in urban slums and remote regions. This became a major pilot in a poor Brazilian shantytown, see http://voices.rdvp.org/eng/ . After 36 years of project leadership in diverse scientific domains and interactive multimedia as a Senior Research Fellow with Philips Electronics, his name is on ~40 patents and articles in international scientific publications. Widely traveled to remote regions and peoples, he was a Winston Churchill Trust Fellow, studying ‘The cultural impact of the Internet on tribal communities’ and a Reuters Digital Vision Fellow at Stanford University, California.

• Nicolas Villaume ( France )
A world renowned photographer and intrepid traveler, Nicolas is also the founder of ‘Conversations with the World’, a visual exploration of international emotion that has resulted in both a book and several exhibitions, see http://www.nicolasvillaume.com Previously online publisher and development director for international media groups, he is the project leader and photographer of ‘Voices of the Andes’ and many multimedia exhibitions about Andean oral traditions, presented in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and France, with Alliance Français and UNESCO sponsorship. (http://www.conversationsdumonde.net/) He is also involved in another initiative, indigenous voices on climate change: http://www.conversationsearth.org/.

See http://www.storybases.org/team2.htm for further relevant experience in education, social initiatives, technology and media brought by other core LCS members. LCS is supported by volunteers, translators and a panel of expert advisors: including César Moreno-Triana (ICH, Unesco), Program Officers from our donors (The Christensen Fund http://www.christensenfund.org/ ) and several Professors at Stanford and Harvard Universities inter alia.

Coopération:
Our LCS tenets are:
• Diversity is precious
• Culture is experienced and enacted, i.e. lived , it can't be preserved like an artefact
• Cultures are not static, they evolve
• Stories are the essence of a culture
• Once the stories are no longer re-told, the culture is dead
• The communities must own the process and its pace
• Bottom-up, not top-down
• Outsiders can facilitate - bringing a global perspective, extracting general principles and developing digital tools which can help other minority cultures
LCS brings new options in technologies or partnerships, but strives to encourage the communities to staff, serve and support themselves. Sustainability comes from community participation and then ownership – not only of their cultural heritage, such as which story genres are important or can be shared with outsiders – but also of the whole process, its evaluation metrics and pace.
Every minority community we have approached has praised the LCS mission and novel approach. In Peru, we have see clear evidence of community ownership. Work in an entirely new zone there was initiated, organized and undertaken by the local LCS team, applying the training they had received in other work zones, even creating their own blogs. Local-level spoken and written testimonials and national-level press coverage and visitors’ reactions at major exhibitions in Lima and Cusco confirm the relevance, importance and effectiveness of LCS activities.
In Mali, our unique local vision and community activities have strong support from the youth, regional level mayors and VIPs, education leaders, the President of the High Council of the Communities of all Mali and top Tuareg chiefs- evidenced by their assistance, testimonials and letters of support. Polls of town people's and desert nomad's opinions of the LCS cultural events and radio broadcasts speak to their importance and impact.
We therefore feel our approach has general application to re-vitalization of other threatened minority cultures, encouraged in this view by great receptiveness and enthusiasm for LCS from communities during our scoping visits to Southern Ethiopia and the Tribal Council of a First Nations Band in British Columbia, see http://storybases-ethiopia-visit.blogspot.com
Summer Institute of Linguistics, Inc. - SIL International
7500 W. Camp Wisdom Road
Dallas TX 75236-5629
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: http://www.sil.org
Tel.: (1 972) 708-7400

Demande d’accréditation n° 90166 : anglais
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 1934
Domaine(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- other
- Literacy and Multlingual Education Linguistic research Translation

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education

Objectifs:
SIL serves language communities worldwide, building their capacity for sustainable language development, by means of research, translation, training, and materials development.
SIL International is a non-profit, scientific educational organization of Christian volunteers that specializes in serving the lesser-known language communities of the world. Its members live among the people of these communities while seeking to understand their cultures and learn their languages. SIL specializes in the application of linguistic research to the literacy and translation needs of the minority language community. In partnership with these communities, SIL helps to develop in them the skills and capacity to preserve their cultures and languages in a way that serves the people best.
SIL focuses on unwritten languages. People who speak these languages often live in geographic, social, and economic isolation. Studying these languages results in practical help for local people and contributes to the broader knowledge of linguistics, anthropology, and ethnomusicology. SIL publishes its research and widely distributes it to libraries, universities, governments, and international agencies.
Within its broader program of language development, SIL engages in safeguarding activities such as the following:
* Documentation of minority and, often, endangered, languages through collection of texts and stories, linguistic analysis, and publications of such analysis and collections of oral history, proverbs, folklore, and legends
* Development and publication of dictionaries that document the rich vocabulary of minority languages and provide a resource for education within the community.
* Study of indigenous music and drama and encouragement and assistance to communities in preserving and developing their indigenous artistic repertoire.
* Promotion and facilitation of education in mother tongues so that new generations of speakers are cultivated within the educational system.
See a fuller description of SIL's primary areas of activity at: http://www.sil.org/sil/SILIntl_English_Flagship2005.pdf

Activités:
SIL has a staff of over 6,000 coming from over 60 countries. Currently SIL's linguistic investigation exceeds 2,550 languages spoken by over 1.2 billion people in more than 70 countries.
Because SIL is committed to people-centered development, the organization gives priority to training local people in ways that help them develop their full potential. SIL works with individuals, communities, and other institutions to help them build their capacity to pursue the development goals that they choose.
Throughout its 75 year history SIL has promoted and trained its personnel to participate in the documentation of minority languages. This includes documenting, analyzing, and publishing oral history and legends, and verbal art. SIL's promotion of local language literacy includes building the capacity of communities to preserve their language and oral traditions and to develop literature that reflects their linguistic and cultural uniqueness. SIL has also sought to encourage people to maintain their indigenous music.
In the pursuit of these objectives, SIL has encouraged its staff to attain advanced degrees in the fields relevant to language development and documentation. SIL has also included training in these domains in its training programs for field workers.
See item 8.c for publications that represent some of SIL's recent safeguarding activities.

Coopération:
Ethnomusicology is one of SIL International’s areas of specialization. SIL’s experts document and analyze indigenous music and have published over 100 articles and monographs within that domain of study. (See http://www.ethnologue.com/show_subject.asp?code=ETM.)
Ethnomusicology within SIL is concerned not only with research and documentation of musics around the world, but also with promoting and encouraging the use of indigenous music to meet contemporary needs within the given society.
SIL holds workshops to encourage and assist local people in appreciating their own music and developing new music in their indigenous style rather than simply adopting music from outside of their own culture. The following articles provide examples of cooperative projects between SIL and local communities in the Democratic Republic of Congo:
• Catalyzing creativity: Nurturing a dying music through apprenticeship
(http://www.sil.org/anthro/articles/CatalyzingCreativity.htm)
• An experimental approach to developing music literacy in central Zaire
http://www.sil.org/anthro/articles/AnExprmntlApprchTDvlyInCntrlZr.htm.
In the course of linguistic fieldwork SIL workers often assist in the documentation and preservation of folklore, legends, and oral history of minority language communities. SIL has published articles and monographs in this area of specialization since 1946. (See http://www.ethnologue.com/show_subject.asp?code=FML for a listing.)
SIL has also analyzed and documented indigenous poetry, riddles, proverbs, and other forms of verbal art.