The EFA 2000 Assessment: Country Reports Homepage of the World Education Forum
   Iraq
Contents of country report Homepage of country reports Country reports listed alphabetically Country reports by region



Previous Page Next Page



Table (13) staff members for Kindergartens and the need through the years of years of the plan 1997/1998 – 2005/2006.

years

 

Teaching staff members

Child to member of staff

Staff members needed

Directress

Assistant

Teacher

Total

97/98

566

566

3560

4692

15

-

98/99

760

760

5724

7244

17

624

99/2000

788

788

6077

7653

17

706

2000/2001

857

857

6408

8122

17

713

2001/2002

821

821

6862

8504

17

836

2002/2003

896

896

7266

9058

16

849

2003/2004

959

959

7772

9690

16

853

2004/2005

993

993

8129

10110

16

933

2005/2006

1062

1026

8572

106696

16

963

 

TOTAL

6477

 

Table (14) –The population of (6 years) age, the number of entrants of (6 years) age, and their percentage of the same age population throughout the years of the plan 1997/1998 – 2005/2006.

 

Year

The population of (6 years) of age.

Expected entrants to grade one.

Percentage of enrolment.

Males Females Total Males Females Total Males Females

Total

97/98 262300 244800 507100 257092 227701 484793 98 93 95.6
98/99 321637 300760 622397 315199 293746 609945 98 98 98
99/2000 328828 307745 636573 322250 301589 623839 98 98 98
2000/2001 336423 314721 651144 329693 308416 638109 98 98 98
2001/2002 353218 324095 677313 346273 316631 663763 98 98 98
2002/2003 353362 331865 685227 347132 325226 671499 98 98 98
2003/2004 363627 340336 703963 356353 233518 689871 98 98 98
2004/2005 364047 349350 713397 365585 343414 708999 98 98 98
2005/2006 470193 432999 903192 460394 424309 884703 98 98 98

Table (15)Number enrolled pupils and leavers in the Primary level:

 

Years

Enrolled in Primary level

Primary school leavers

Males Females Total Males Females Total
97/98 1677965 1351421 3029386 146668 112457 259125
98/99 2205626 1921568 4127194 305680 271401 577081
99/2000 2224432 1949232 4173664 317816 284214 602030
2000/2001 2240297 1984881 4225178 327028 290775 617803
2001/2002 2255790 2001963 4257753 332895 297752 630647
2002/2003 2275149 2001070 4276219 341170 304577 645747
2003/2004 2296395 2064298 4360693 347662 311971 659633
2004/2005 2320711 2097658 4418369 354709 319616 674325
2005/2006 2348235 2132868 4481103 363491 327411 690908

Table (16) Number of divisions, schools and teachers, and the needed teachers during the years of the plan 97/98-2005/2006.

 

Years

 

Number of Division

Pupils Per division

Number of schools

Pupils Per school

Number of teachers

Pupils Per teachers

Needed Teachers

97/98

86093

35

8333

364

141935

21

-

98/99

127923

32

10310

400

208737

20

12382

99/2000

127564

33

10531

396

213224

19

10977

2000/2001

133700

31

10763

392

218370

19

12119

2001/2002

134074

32

10960

390

222517

19

10964

2002/2003

140016

31

11249

384

229043

19

13507

2003/2004

143430

30

11586

378

234685

19

12797

2004/2005

147950

29

11823

374

242213

18

14545

2005/2006

148712

29

11899

377

241938

19

12037

Table (17) Numbers of enrolled pupils (Total &6-11 years group) and their ratio to population of age-group (6-11 years) through the years of the plan 97/98- 2005/2006.

 

Years

 

Population 6-11 group

Pupils 6-11 group

Enrolment %

Total number of pupils enrolled

Enrolment %

97/98

2940900

2738975

93.1

3029386

103

98/99

3671303

3287018

89.5

3927194

107

99/2000

3808077

3359510

88.2

4173964

109.6

2000/2001

3819543

3422517

89.6

4213179

110.3

2001/2002

3921320

3513858

89.6

4270109

108.9

2002/2003

4023590

3605728

89.6

4322439

107.4

2003/2004

4157737

3710780

89.2

4378187

105.3

2004/2005

4219767

3781519

89.6

4437591

105.2

2005/2006

4322845

3874414

89.6

4501698

104

Table (18) Expected percentages of repetition in primary stage (both genders) for the period 97/98-2005/2006.

Years

 

Grade one

Grade two

Grade three

Grade four

Grade five

Grade six

97/98

13.2

13.2

12.0

13.7

22.7

7.2

98/99

9.7

9.6

8.7

10.6

19.2

10.1

99/2000

8.7

8.8

7.9

9.6

17.3

9.5

2000/2001

7.7

7.8

7.0

8.5

16.2

8.8

2001/2002

6.7

6.8

6.3

7.3

14.2

7.9

2002/2003

5.6

5.9

5.1

6.4

12.4

7.2

2003/2004

4.5

4.9

4.2

5.3

10.6

6.5

2004/2005

3.4

4.0

3.3

4.2

8.9

5.6

2005/2006

2.6

3.1

2.5

3.5

7.5

5.0

B-

(1) Many of the surveys carried out in the field of dropout from education, study of the impacts on the behavioral trends of the students and educational staffs, and the studies in the field of motivity towards education and learning showed the following:

- Worsening of the problem of dropout in general education and vocational training due to the economical impacts of the blockade on the family income, and the social effects resulting from the weakness of conviction in education and its output.

- Appearance of some undesired behavioural problems in the field of education, such as theft, cheating and abuse of the properties, debility in adhering to moral values, and bribe.

- Weakness of the student’s motivity to study.

- Weakness of the educational staff motitivity to wards the profession.

- Weakness of the parents of the students in keeping pace in study with their children.

- Weakness of the relationship between the local society and school due to the indulgence of most parents in every day life problem.

(2) The blockade influenced the educational and cultural communications with the outside world negatively, and inactivated most cultural agreements establish between Iraq and the countries of the world.

(3) The effects of malnutrition and anemia acted upon the children, pupils and students on their health conditions, from which arose the indications of weakness, fatigue and laziness… and the incapability of some to practice their educational activities and pursue their lessons, and the weakness of concentration, which doubled the efforts of the teachers… Many of those dropped out of classes under the pressure of sikness and inability to accommodate with the learning atmosphere.

(4) Several Iraqi schools outside the country were classed, their number was (16), primary and secondary and the number of (11) school and (520) students.

(5) The inability to supply the schools with the requirements for heating and cooling lead to the infection of many pupils by diseases, as are result their exposure to cold and humidity and the outbreak of disease such as influenza, tonsilities, severe bronchitis, typhoid, asthma and parotitis, gout, measles, and diarrhea… which lead to their many many visits to health centers especially in winter. Consequently the increase in the rate of absence and sick-reports and what results in influencing the educational standard negatively, and what multiplied this influence was the scantiness in doctors and big shortage in medicine and medical necessities, and the hampering of medical care in schools.

Numerical outcome of the attack in 1991:

1- The number of the damaged school buildings in the countries provinces, aside of the self-governing area, was (4,157).

2- The number of impaired school trips: (323,850).

3- The number of spoiled books in school libraries: (1,343,438).

4- The number of computers and its operating apparatus damaged: (488) sets.

5- Damaged equipments of (107) vocational training center.

6- The number of damaged educational media devices (898,181).

The cost of these damages was (214,626,319) two hundred and fourteen million six hundred twenty six thousand three hundred and nineteen dinars, which is (645) six hundred forty five million dollars… and to June, 1997 these damages are estimated at (450) four hundred and fifty billion dinars.

4- General knowledge, administration and abilities:

Starting from the national responsibility which the institutions of the state, especially the Ministry of Education, and the popular and professional organizations perceive towards the student and the necessity to secure their education and sound raising after the fact of the inconvenience of the comprehension memorandum to fulfill the country’s needs from cultural and education necessities except by (20%) approximately appeared, it was natural and inevitable that their procession stops, even to encounter the crucial challenges, and tending the students to be the focus where the educational, social utmost ends of the state meat, as the students because the focus of attention of all, and the effort continued to think of then on strategic level and convert it into sponsoring programmes acquainting the Irag management method, the use of the various alternatives setout this tendance because eminent features in the life of the people the Irag called for by the nature of the future responsibilities imposed on the shoulders of the youth in construction and progress. There fore the government assumed the following measures in maintaining the soundness of education and raising the children.

    1. Resumption of education and its stability in all education levels, audits constancy in its defined dates.
    2. Completion of the programmes and carrying out the general and school examinations according to its appropriate official procedures had compensated for the interruption period in educating the children.
    3. Molidization of all systems and technical capabilities in cooperation with the local administrations in the provinces to persue an exceptional plan, resulted in repairing and reconstructing (3111)school in 1991 formed the rate of (76%)of the damaged schools.
    4. Reembursing the impaired schools by the requirements, as trips black boards, records, educational media, laboratory apparatus and school library books by means of central distribution, interexchange among the schools, offers, and contributions.
    5. Recovering the educational books from the children at the end scholastic year and redistribute the proper to children in the next year.
    6. Achieving funds to reprint some of the school books and benefiting from some agreements in this field.
    7. Allocating the seems within the comprehension memorandum to provide the impaired schools needs from class room seats, blackboards, laboratory materials, sports and artistic equipment and paper.
    8. Providing stationary, pencils and copybooks in nominal prices for the children.
    9. Undertaking emergency plan to fill in the vacancies in the popular, far, and distant areas through decreeing legislations that guarantee in crease in teachers salaries and dividents, increase in their financial incentives, and insuring lodge for them.
    10. Initiating prompt qualifying educational courses for employees and University and institutes graduates in various specializations to work as fill in teachers and instructors.
    11. Rendering attendance in schools in distant rural areas for five days a week.
    12. Impartation of students parents in transporting the teachers (males and females)in the rural, far and distant areas in addition to what allow ances the government provides to cover transport expenses.
    13. Increasing the teachers shares of teaching hours to (30) instead of (26) weekly to fill in the vacancies.
    14. Utilizing local material in manufacturing the studying benches from wood and palm branches to meet some of the needs of the schools in it.
    15. Manufacturing children’s toys and games and educational media locally.
    16. Performing inter-exchanges among the schools to ensure the needs of some of them from the surplus educational requirements in others.
    17. Opening the parallel formal education charnel through evening education popular schools and youth schools (males and females) to intake those who missed the learning opportunity, the dropouts, or the precipitants.
    18. Opening several evening training centers and fine arts institutes for the females teachers to provide female teachers to fill in the vacancies.
    19. Coordinating between the educational authorities, the family and the local administrative authorities responsible of executing the law of obligatory education to pursue the dropouts and bring then back to the study seats in addition to acknowledgement of the dangers of with drawal.
    20. Increasing the salaries, allotments, and rates of the teachers and instructors lectures, to raise their living standard and block up the escapes of dropout of education profession.
    21. Opening of in service refreshing training courses to raise the teachers and instructors efficiency and pace up with newest outcomes in the field of educating and tending the youth and the adults.
    22. Adopting the results of the recent researches and studies and applying it in schools to benefit from it in breaking the cultural blockade.
    23. Propounding the coordination with the human and international organizations particularly UNICEF and UNESCO in the field of qualifying the schools and supplying some basic necessities to provide medical care for primary schools infants.


Previous Page Next Page