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Part 3 – National Agenda for the Future : Suggestions and Recommendations

This part would be devoted to examine policy directions adopted in Sri Lanka in relation to the improvement within the six dimensions of EFA goals. Also this part will state briefly the steps already taken and the future plans to be implemented.

    1. ECCD Programmes

Though much attention has not been paid on ECCD programmes in the past, the PTF on Education in 1997 has made the following recommendations :

(a). To entrust responsibility of initiating activities regarding ECCD to the children’s Secretariat that comes under the purview of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs. The NFED of MEHE is expected to work in collaboration with the Children’s Secretariat.

(b). To create awareness among mothers on their responsibilities regarding ECCD and Home Based Education strategies :

(c). To launch awareness programmes to educate the general public and care givers involved in the field of ECCD

(d). To organize training programmes for mothers as well as care givers. The assistance of community leaders and NGOO to be sought to facilitate training.

The PTF on Education is of the view that ECCD and Pre-school Education programmes need not be under government control, but it has accepted that there should be some kind

of supervision and guidance by the government over these programmes. In this context the PTF has proposed the following strategies :

(a). To motivate Provincial Council Authorities to increase the number of Pre-schools in their regions to provide more opportunities for children of 03 – 05 years of age limit to participate in pre-school Education

(b). To enact laws regarding the supervision and monitoring of the quality of facilities provided for teachers and students in pre-schools.

(c). To prepare a suitable curriculum for pre-schools with the cooperation of Universities, MEHE, Ministry of Health and other related institutions. This curriculum to be pre-tested, finalized and then distributed among the Provincial Councils. It will serve as a guideline for teaching and will not be treated as compulsory for adoption

(d). To establish an ECCD Study Centre and Department of Child Development attached to a University with the objectives of evaluating the present pre-school programmes, collecting information and conducting research on ECCD. (A Department of child Development has already been established at the Open University of Sri Lanka).

The five year plan (1999-2004) of MEHE has set targets to train 800 Pre-school teachers and 200 officers working in ECCD programmes, annually. Accordingly it is planned to train 4000 pre-school teachers and 1000 officers within the five years. This task is expected to be accomplished by NFED of MEHE with the assistance of Provincial Departments of Education. Rs. 20 million has been allocated for this task.

    1. Primary Education
    2. The PTF on Education has recommended the following activities regarding Primary Education to be accomplished within the five years commencing from 1999 :

      (a). To develop a competency based curriculum, supported by suitable text books, work books and other related curriculum materials such as teacher guides, additional reading material, etc.,

      (b). To organize pre-service and in-service training programmes for COE lecturers and in-service advisors to enhance their knowledge in better teaching methodologies and the awareness of the new curriculum

      (c). To extend the scheme of assessment introduced in Junior Secondary Classes gradually to the primary cycle. The teachers should be guided to develop their own assessment tools to suit their classroom needs.

      (d). To develop a sample of schools as model primary schools by providing buildings, furniture and equipment. These models are expected to set examples to other schools.

      (e). To recruit teachers with necessary qualifications as heads of primary schools.

      (f). To develop a supervision and monitoring programme by the MEHE in collaboration with the NIE. The officers of the Provincial Departments of Education, District and Zonal Education offices should be entrusted with the task of organising effective monitoring and supervision programmes.

      The Five Year Primary Education Plan in Sri Lanka (1999) has identified the following goals and targets with regard to primary education :

      Goal I - Ensure the initial enrolment of all boys and girls of official primary

      education entry age, and the retention of all boys and girls in Grades 1 – 5 before 2004.

      Targets related to Goal I

      (a). Increase of Net Initial Intake Rate up to 100 percent by 2004

      (b). Increase of Net Enrolment Ratio up to 100 percent by 2004

      (c). Increase of Completion Ratio up to 100 percent in 2004

      (d). Ensure that the maximum distance to school from the residence of a Grade 01 child is 2 km. by 2000

      Goals 2 - Ensure an increase in attainment in essential learning continuum competencies by all boys and girls completing the primary education cycle by 2004

      Targets related to Goals 2

      (a). Increase of percentage of students mastering essential learning competencies (Competencies in communication, Competencies relating to the Environment, Competencies relating to ethics and religion, Competencies in play and the use of leisure, Competencies Relating to ‘learning to learn’, at least up to 90 percent by 2004).

      (b). Reduction of repetition rate to less than 1.0 percent by 2004

      (c). Increase of percentage of teachers qualified in primary education to 100 percent by 2004.

      Goals 3 - Improve the quality of primary education management at school, divisional, zonal, provincial and national levels by year 2004.

      Targets related to Goal 3

      (a). Ensure the appointment of primary trained principals or sectional heads to all schools by 2001.

      (b). Increase the percentage of Primary school Principals and Primary Section Heads with training in primary education methods to 100 percent by 2004.

      (c). Ensure the appointment of appropriately trained ISAA in primary education to achieve an ISA : PT ratio of 1:75 for both media and 1:60 for areas of low population density by 2001

      (d). Ensure that the maximum number of schools with primary education grades to be handled by a subject specialist officer to be 60 by 2001

      (e). Ensure that all Divisional Directors of Education, ISAA, primary education subject specialists, zonal and provincial level primary education officers are trained in primary methods by 2004

      (f). Ensure the establishment of an appropriate organizational structure for the development of primary education from national to school level by 2001

      (g). Establish a primary education EMIS from national to school level by 2001.

      Goal 4 - Promote the equitable allocation of human and financial resources to primary education by 2004

      Targets related to Goal 4

      (a). Achieve a pupil teacher ratio of 26 : 1 by 2001 and 27 : 1 by 2003 and reduce teacher excesses / deficits to less than 2 percent of national primary teaching force.

      (b). Formulate and consolidate a mechanism of unit cost resource allocation based on norm specific formula in terms of supply of personnel, physical facilities, education material and other quality inputs by 2001

      (c). Set aside 10 percent of allocations for consumables to disadvantaged schools in addition to the normal allocation by 2001

      (d). Establish a separate budget programme for primary education at national and provincial level for recurrent expenditure by 2000 and for capital expenditure by 2001

      (e). Revise and update MEHE circulars governing the collection and appropriation of funds at school level to ensure that substantial proportion of internal school funds are appropriate to grades 1 – 5 by 2004

      A special group of children that deserve attention in relation to Primary Education are children with special needs. The PTF has proposed the following strategies with regard to education of children with special needs:

      (a). Make provision to admit children with special needs to the formal system of Education

      (b). Establish special schools and institutions to cater to the needs of children with special needs where difficulties arise in admitting them to the formal schools

      (c). Provide special education programmes for gifted children without disturbing the functioning of the normal school system

      (d). Provide special programmes during vacations for gifted children to improve their academic abilities

      The five year plan of MEHE indicates the following activities to be accomplished during the period of 1999 – 2003 in the area of special education:

      (a). Detection and prevention of childhood disabilities and rehabilitation of detected disabled pupils

      (b). Orientation programme on inclusive education for principals, sectional heads and primary teachers. It is expected to train 3000 personnel during the 5 years

      (c). Training of 4000 teachers during the period

      (d). Supply of audio visual and other special aids for disabled children. It is expected to supply 2500 hearing aids 5000 spectacles for children with visual and audio impairments

      (e). Rehabilitation of the Braille press and installation of machinery. Old machines at the NIE Braille press will be replaced by new machines

      (f). Establishment of educational units and resource centres. 125 educational units and 40 resource centres are planned to be established by the end of 2003

      (g). Conducting awareness programmes for parents and general public about disabled children, slow learners and gifted children. 125 programmes will be conducted during this period

      The Primary curriculum revision commenced in 1999 in Grade 01 will be gradually extended to other grades of the primary cycle and will be completed in year 2003. Also the identification of the minimum (essential) learning continuum will be completed by year 2004.

      These changes in curriculum will increase pupil activities that require more physical space and other infrastructure facilities. The classrooms of the primary school will be remodeled or reconstructed to provide more space and other physical facilities.

      With the extension of the revised curricula to successive grades yearly, the primary teachers in the service will be retrained to suit the new changes. In addition also College of Education curricula is undergoing changes to provide necessary training for primary teachers.

      Under the World Bank Project on Teacher Education and Teacher Deployment (TETD) steps will be taken to have a more balanced spread of teachers among schools.

      At present the most serious problem that Sri Lanka faces regarding teachers is not employment, but deployment. The above graph highlights the Teacher-Pupil Ratio according to provinces for the years 1990 and 1998.

      As the ratio differs drastically among the regions, measures will be taken in future to achieve the accepted pupil teacher ratio 1 : 26 for the primary cycle. In this regard MEHE is implementing a teacher transfer scheme to achieve a teacher pupil ratio for primary cycle as indicated in the following table.

      Table 23 : Officially prescribed pupil teacher ratio for primary cycle

      Enrolment in

      No. of primary

      No. of

      Total no. of

      Pupil

      primary cycle

      Average

      general

      English

      teachers

      teacher

      Grades 1-5

      Enrolment

      teachers

      teachers

      for primary

      ratio

      Less than 25

      13

      1

      1

      2

      7

      25

      -

      44

      35

      2

      1

      3

      12

      45

      -

      74

      60

      3

      1

      4

      15

      75

      -

      114

      95

      4

      1

      5

      19

      115

      -

      164

      140

      5

      1

      6

      23

      165

      -

      199

      182

      6

      1

      7

      26

      200

      -

      239

      220

      7

      1

      8

      28

      240

      -

      279

      260

      8

      1

      9

      29

      280

      -

      319

      300

      9

      1

      10

      30

      320

      -

      359

      340

      10

      1

      11

      31

      360

      -

      399

      380

      11

      1

      12

      32

      400

      -

      439

      420

      12

      2

      14

      30

      440

      -

      479

      460

      13

      2

      15

      31

      480

      -

      519

      500

      14

      2

      16

      31

      520

      -

      559

      540

      15

      2

      17

      32

      560

      -

      599

      580

      16

      2

      18

      32

      600

      -

      639

      620

      17

      2

      19

      33

      640

      -

      679

      660

      18

      2

      20

      33

      680

      -

      719

      700

      19

      2

      21

      33

      720

      -

      759

      740

      20

      2

      22

      34

      760

      -

      799

      780

      21

      2

      23

      34

      800

      -

      839

      820

      22

      2

      24

      34

      840

      -

      879

      860

      23

      3

      26

      33

      880

      -

      919

      900

      24

      3

      27

      33

      920

      -

      959

      940

      25

      3

      28

      34

      960

      -

      999

      980

      26

      3

      29

      34

      1000

      -

      1039

      1020

      27

      3

      30

      34

      1040

      -

      1079

      1060

      28

      3

      31

      34

      1080

      -

      1119

      1100

      29

      3

      32

      34

      1120

      -

      1159

      1140

      30

      3

      33

      35

      1160

      -

      1199

      1180

      31

      3

      34

      35

      1200

      -

      1239

      1220

      32

      3

      35

      35

      1240

      -

      1279

      1260

      33

      4

      37

      34

      1280

      -

      1319

      1300

      34

      4

      38

      34

      1320

      -

      1359

      1340

      35

      4

      39

      34

      1360

      -

      1399

      1380

      36

      4

      40

      35

      1400

      -

      1439

      1420

      37

      4

      41

      35

      1440

      -

      1479

      1460

      38

      4

      42

      35

      1480

      -

      1519

      1500

      39

      4

      43

      35

      1520

      -

      1559

      1540

      40

      4

      44

      35

      1560

      -

      1599

      1580

      41

      4

      45

      35

      1600

      -

      1639

      1620

      42

      4

      46

      35

      1640

      -

      1679

      1660

      43

      4

      47

      35

      1680

      -

      1719

      1700

      44

      4

      48

      35

      1720

      -

      1759

      1740

      45

      4

      49

      36

      1760

      -

      1799

      1780

      46

      4

      50

      36

      1800

      -

      1839

      1820

      47

      4

      51

      36

      1840

      -

      1879

      1860

      48

      4

      52

      36

      1880

      -

      1919

      1900

      49

      4

      53

      36

      1920

      -

      1959

      1940

      50

      4

      54

      36

      1960

      -

      1999

      1980

      51

      4

      55

      36

      In order to find a solution to the problem of teacher deployment the government has approved an incentive package to motivate teachers to serve in schools classified as difficult stations. This package of incentives include the following :

      (a). Providing priority in giving loans under advances to public servants.

      (b). Giving preference in granting scholarships and training opportunities

      (c). Considering as having served an extra one year in respect of each period of three years served in difficult stations for teachers who are required to complete a specific period of service for promotion in the service

      (d). Giving preference in providing living quarters

      (e). Allowing an extra increment for the teachers serving in difficult stations who obtain 25 percent of their annual leave entitlement during 03 consecutive years

      (MEHE Circular No : 99/17)

      A School Based Assessment programme which commenced in 1999 will be gradually extended to successive grades annually. The Implementation will be completed in year 2003. The training of teachers and preparation of necessary assessment guides are planned to be supplied yearly.

      Under the DFID programme arrangements have been made to prepare Regional Primary Education Plans. This programme expects each province to prepare its own independent primary education plan on guidelines and framework provided by MEHE. This will complement the independence given to the provincial authorities in implementing their own primary education programmes. In allocation of budgets for Education, Sri Lanka has not shown any concern for making separate allocation for Secondary and Primary Schools. Steps will be taken to separate primary school budget from the secondary school budget. This will lead to a rapid progress in primary education in Sri Lanka.

    3. Learning Achievement

Monitoring learning achievement is considered as a vehicle for improving learning teaching and the curriculum process. The learning achievement surveys conducted in 1994, 1996 and 1999 with the support of the UNICEF and the UNESCO have led to the initiation of more innovative teaching – learning procedures and new curriculum development strategies. Additional surveys will be carried out in year 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006 to assess the improvements in performance at Grade 03 and Grade 05 levels.

The gathered information will be disseminated to planners at National and Provincial level and school level authorities so that their future endeavors can be enhanced in making primary education process more efficient and effective. A formative evaluation process will be implemented at the classroom level to assess the pupils in relation to their achievement of Essential learning continuum.

The successful implementation of the competency based curriculum and the achievement of essential competencies by all those who complete primary education will be supported by School Based Assessment (SBA). The five year primary education plan proposes the following activities for reforms in evaluation and assessment in primary grades ;

(a). Extension of the assessment formats given in teachers guides for Grade 01 to other grades with the introduction of the new curriculum

(b). Production of a manual for primary teachers on assessing and keeping records regarding the students’ attaining mastery level and achieving competencies.

(c). Development and introduction of a new standard reporting format for the purpose of conveying the levels of achievement of children to their parents.

(d). Drawing more attention on diagnosis of learning problems encountered by children and taking remedial measures based on such diagnoses

(e). Training primary education officers, ISAA, Primary school principals, Sectional heads and Primary teachers on administration of SBA will be commenced in year 2000 as follows :

Primary Education Officers …180

Primary Education ISAA…900

Primary Principals…2318

Primary Sectional Heads…3417

Primary Teachers 26000

The programme will be continued during the next few years

    1. Adult Literacy

The five year plan of MEHE includes the following actions with regard to Adult Education to be accomplished within the period 1999 – 2003

(a). Establishment of 1000 reading centres for adults;

(b). Establishment of 1500 non formal technical units in 1AB schools

(c). Provision of equipment to 1500 non formal education units located in 1AB schools

(d). Provision of perishables for 1500 non formal technical training units in 1AB schools;

(e). Establishment of 2500 training centres for non school going children and adults

The Non formal Education Officers employed at divisional level by MEHE will organize literacy and skill development programmes through their Regional Learning Centres. The NFED of MEHE has already provided guidelines to these officers as to how these programmes should be organized. The NFED re-emphasized their philosophy and line of action with regard to adult literacy on the Literacy Day on 08th September 1999 by declaring a programme for admission of non school goers and dropouts into the formal education system. This programme envisaged the identification of such children and promoting parents to send them to the formal school. Another significant trend evident in

this regard was the initiation made by the Ministry of Youth Services and Sports to promote such children to enter the formal education system. This Ministry with the assistance of the Samurdhi Authority (a programme for alleviation of poverty) and the Samurdhi animators launched a programme to identify these children and provide them with necessary materials and equipment to motivate them to join the formal school. This programme which was accompanied by an extensive mass media campaign will be continued in the future with the support of the MEHE. The Ministry of Social Services is another agent that looks after adult literacy programmes. The literacy and skill development projects conducted by the Ministry of Social Services will be continued without disturbance.

3.5 Training in Essenstial Skills

Training in essential skills has different dimensions. The Vocational Guidance week held from 13th to 19th September 1999 focussed its attention on the very important aspect of vocational training. This programme was launched by the Ministry of Vocational Training with the assistance of the Vocational and Technical Education Commission. The programme was supported by Mass Media. A series of Radio and TV programmes highlighted the significance of vocational training and identifying a vocation that suits an idividual. This programme was an idea proposed by the Presidential Task Force on Vocational Training.

The Vocational Training Authority of Sri Lanka has identified Vocational Training Programmes for school leavers at two levels. Level one includes programmes for children who leave the school after the G.C.E. (O.L) examination. These programmes are meant for adult students of 17 – 25 years old. Duration of these courses ranges from six weeks to four years. The list of training programmes include the areas such as Commerce, Management, Marketing, Engineering, Science, Arts, Languages, Computer, Law, Agriculture, Teacher Education and Garments and Apparel Level two is meant for adult

students who leave the school after G.C.E. (A.L) examination. These programmes are meant for adult students in the age range of 17-30 years. Duration of these courses extend from four months to four years. These training programmes are meant for Electricians, T.V & Radio mechanics, Refrigeration and A.C mechanics, Motor mechanics, Lathe operators, Fitters, Welders, Carpenters, Masons, Computer operators, Hotel crews, Gem and jewellery craftsmans, Tailors, Health workers, Clerks, Typists, Artists and Printers.

The National Youth Council of Sri Lanka (NYSC) an organization established for youth activities has organized a series of programmes to provide vocational training and vocational opportunities for youths. These programmes can be categorized under 06 main objectives :

  • (A). Providing vocational guidance to youths. To achieve this objective it has organized the following :

  • (a). National Vocational Information Centres

    (b). District Vocational Information Centres

    (c). National Level Job Fairs

    (d). District Level Job Fairs

  • (B). Providing opportunities to identify alternative jobs or income generating sources. The following activities are organized to achieved the above objective

  • (a). Establishing 20 Regional training centres

    (b). Establishing 04 National training centres

    (c). Launching awareness programmes

    (d). Conducting orientation programmes

    (C). Developing Business Enterprises belonging to youths

    The following are the activities organized to achieve the above objective :

    (a). Broadening small Business Enterprises

    (b). Establishing a net work of youth business enterprises

    (c). Establishing a Technical School for students interested in business

    (d). Introducing Business Counselling Service

    (e). Broadening loan facilities for youths

    (D). Providing business counselling for school leavers

    The following are the activities organized in this regard

    (a). Holding vocational guidance programmes for school children

    (b). Holding a national youth counselling week

    (E). Establishing inter-institutional relationships to facilitate provision of jobs. Activities organized to achieve this objective are as follows :

    (a). Establishment of a unit for coordination of the activities of such institutions

    (b). Establishment of a Human Resource Reserve and Job Information Bank

    (F). Reorganizing youth cooperatives (NYSCO)

    In order to reach the above objective the following steps are taken :

    (a). Establishment of District Banks

    (b). Establishment of Sales Units

    (c). Holding fairs

    (d). Establishing unified companies with the assistance of youth Co-operative societies

    (e). Establishing youth cooperative banks

    (f). Establishing a foundation for small business development

    The Department of Technical Education and Training (DTET) extends its services through 36 Technical Institutions. It conducts certificate courses in Business Studies, Technical Courses and Trade Courses. The Sri Lanka Institute of Advanced Technical Education conducts courses in Engineering, Accountancy, Commerce and Agriculture.

    The Vocational Training Authority conducts 92 courses during the year. The National Apprentice and Industrial Training Authority will conduct their 180 courses continuously in future. New courses in the area of Hotel and Tourism, Textile and Garments, Construction, Gem and Jewellery, Information Technology, Computer Training Printing etc., will be introduced anew (Central Bank Report – 1998) The Federation of Chambers of Commerce and Industry in Sri Lanka has prepared a Career Guidance Directory which provides very important information to adult students who leave school after completing G.C.E. (O.L) and G.C.E. (A.L) examinations. This is a comprehensive document that would provide better information of the various options available for developing a suitable career path and for those wanting to up grade their skills. It also helps parents and counsellors in directing youth to identify a suitable career. The Directory has grouped 205 jobs under the following 18 categories :

        1. Managerial and Management Related Occupations
        2. Engineers, Surveyors and Architects
        3. Natural Computer and Mathematical Scientists
        4. Lawyers, Social Scientists and Social workers
        5. Teachers, Librarians and Counsellors
        6. Health Diagnosing and Treating practitioners
        7. Health Co-workers
        8. Health Technologists and Technicians
        9. Writers, Artists and Entertainers
        10. Technologists and Technicians other than Health
        11. Marketing / Sales occupations
        12. Administrative Support Occupations
        13. Service Occupations
        14. Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Related Occupation
        15. Mechanics and Repairers
        16. Construction Trades
        17. Production Occupations
        18. Transportation Occupations

    This Directory gives details about working conditions training and other qualifications required for the jobs listed.

    3.6 Education for Better living

    More responsibility of providing Education for better living will rest on Informal Education Agencies. In this context Radio, Television and News papers will play a major role. The mass media programmes that are aimed at developing knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for better living are of three kinds. They are programmes for development of knowledge, development of personality attributes and programmes for development of skills. Radio and Television programmes on basic health habits are frequent. Special mass media programmes related to HIV, Polio and other dangerous diseases such as Dengue Fever, Filaria, Malaria, Dysentery etc. are playing a major role in educating for better living. Environmental pollution and conservation are themes that frequently discussed in mass media programmes. Family planning programmes launched by the Health Department is another attempt of educating people for better living. Many programmes aim at developing personality and attributes of people which ultimately lead them for better living. Dramas, Musical programmes, Feature programmes, Religious programmes contribute to development of positive personality characteristics which promote the quality of living environment. Various competitions such as, Cycle Races, Art festivals, Sports festivals, New Year festivals are some of the programmes organized by Mass media leading to development of certain skills which may be essential for better living.

    In Sri Lanka the use of electronic and print media for educational purposes have been widened during the last decade. By 1999 eight Television channels are in operation. Seven Radio Broadcasting Services are functioning. Each of these services has special education service programmes. These programmes are of two types. One is curriculum based and the other is based on general themes on education. There is a special unit at the NIE which is involved in educational media programmes. This unit is accomplishing activities such as script writing, production of programmes and arranging broadcasts and telecasts. In this respect Sri Lanka Rupavahini Corporation and Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation which are government services play a major role. In producing educational programmes these two services prepare time tables of their programmes and send them to schools. School heads are supposed to arrange the school activities to suit T.V. and Radio programmes and make provision for students to watch and listen to them. Often special discussion programmes are arranged to educate the general public on matters related to education. In newspapers, special features are arranged on educational issues and problems.

    Discussions and debates on themes of interest in education which appear in mass media help the general public themselves understand various aspects related to the educational activities carried out in the country. Health and agriculture are two other Ministries which are engaged in fulfilling tasks that eventually help improve the quality of life of the general public. Education is the principal agent in increasing the quality of life of the people. In the present context, the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports and the Ministry of Social Services have taken hand in hand with the Ministry of Education & Higher Education in launching programmes to educate the general public as well as the students for better living. For instance the Samurdhi programme meant for improving the quality of life and the non-formal education programmes arranged by National Youth Services Council (NYSC) for adult education are such attempts leading for better living. In addition, the NYSC has launched many other programmes such as Performing Arts, Computer literacy, Beauty culture etc, that lead to improvement of knowledge and skills needed for better living.

    F:\COMMON\UHNDL\COMMITTE.DOC

    Committee on EFA Year 2000 Assessment

    01. Prof. Viswa Warnapala (Chairman) - Deputy Minister, MEHE

    02. Prof. Lal Perera (National Coordinator- Additional Secretary, MEHE

    03. Dr. P Udagama- Secretary General, UNESCO, Sri Lanka

    04. Mrs. Soma de Silva- UNICEF, Sri Lanka

    05. Ms. C Constance- UNICEF, Sri Lanka

    06. Mr. P W Gunasekara- Director of Education, PPM, MEHE

    07. Prof. (Mrs.) G I C Gunawardena- Open University, Sri Lanka

    08. Mr. D A Perera- Education Consultant

    09. Mr. A A Navaratne- Assistant Director General, NIE

    10. Mr. C Navaratne- Deputy Director of Education, MEHE

    11. Mr. Y A N D Yapa- Deputy Director of Education, MEHE

    12. Mr. S U Wijeratne- Deputy Director of Education, MEHE

    13. Mr. P N Ilapperuma- Deputy Director of Education, MEHE

    14. Ms. Kamala Pieris- Education Consultant

    15. Mrs. D Kottachchi- Statistician, University Grants’ Commision

    16. Mrs. Padmini de Silva- Statistician, MEHE

    17. Mrs. T A R J Gunasekara- Director Planning, NIE

    18. Dr. G L S Nanayakkara- Director, Primary Education, NIE

    19. Mr. A M R B Amarakoon- Commissioner General of Examinations

    20. Mr. S W M Semasinghe - Secretary, PME, North Central Province

    21. Mr. W B M Saddharatne - PDE, Western Province

    22. Mr. Haris Rajapakshe- TETD Project, MEHE

    23. Mr. M Sivagnanam- Director, Primary Education Planning Project

    24. Mr. Sterling Perera- Education Consultant

    25. Mr. K. Samarasinghe - Director, NFED, MEHE

                                                                                                                                   END


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