Framework for Action - Participants -Organizers
Online coverage - NGO Consultation
Latest news - Follow-up to the Dakar Forum
The opinion of EFA partners - Grassroots stories
The EFA 2000 Assessment - The findings
The regional meetings - Evaluation
Press releases - Press kit
Photo corner - Media contacts
Press releases > Recife 03/02/2000
Paris 02/03/001
Paris 29/01/001
Bamako 28/11/00
Paris 02/10/00
Paris 02/10/00
Paris 26/05/00
Dakar 28/04/00
Dakar 27/04/00
Dakar 27/04/00
Dakar 27/04/00
Dakar 26/04/00
Dakar 26/04/00
Paris 21/04/00
New York 18/04/00
Paris 11/04/00
 Paris 20/03/00
 Paris 15/03/00
 Paris 10/03/00
 Washington 01/03/00
 Paris 22/02/00
 Paris 15/02/00
 Warsaw 08/02/00
 Warsaw 06/02/00
 Recife 03/02/00
 Bangkok 20/01/00
 Bangkok 18/01/00
 Bangkok 17/01/00
 Warsaw 17/01/00
 Bangkok 12/01/00
 Johannesburg 08/12/99
 Johannesburg 07/12/99
 Johannesburg 06/12/99
 
Nine high-population countries pledge to intensity efforts to ensure Education for All
 
  Recife, 3 February 2000 (UNESCO) - Education ministers and officials from nine high-population developing countries (E-9) - Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria and Pakistan - reaffirmed their pledge to "sustain, intensify and accelerate their efforts and policies" in pursuing education for all, during a conference in the Brazilian city of Recife.
 
  The E-9 meeting, attended by seven education ministers and two high-level officials, was the fourth of six conferences to assess the progress and shortfalls in the worldwide struggle to achieve education for all. Each meeting will make recommendations to the World Education Forum, which will take place in Dakar, Senegal, on April 26-28.
 
  In a Declaration issued on Wednesday at the conclusion of the three-day ministerial review meeting, delegates expressed satisfaction at the "significant breakthroughs in all nine countries" since the summit in New Delhi, India, in 1993.
 
  The Declaration recognises the achievements in education recorded in the last ten years, while stressing the need to draft a new visionary agenda for the new millennium that recognises basic education as a human right. Quality education is acknowledged as the biggest challenge and the greatest hope.
 
  Participants from the E-9 countries, which account for half the world’s population and 70% of global illiteracy, stressed that the needs of the 21st century called for the use of the newest methods and the most modern technology to achieve truly global modernisation and excellence in education.
 
  Participants from the E-9 countries, which account for half the world’s population and 70% of global illiteracy, stressed that the needs of the 21st century called for the use of the newest methods and the most modern technology to achieve truly global modernisation and excellence in education.
 
  The Declaration takes stock of the achievements and challenges of the last decade and spells out its goals: prioritising EFA; increasing the number of students in basic, middle and higher education; mainstreaming children with special needs; implementing modalities to link education and the world of work; increased technical cooperation among countries to ensure access and equity; stressing values such as justice, democracy, human rights, tolerance and respect for diversity; and paying special attention to adolescents and gender equity, among others.
 
  In pointing the way ahead, the E-9 countries recognised the seriousness of the problems that continue to impede their progress towards education for all and stressed the need to address them in an innovative and creative manner.
 
  The Brazilian education minister, Paulo Renato Souza, said that in a globalised inter-dependent world, "educational responsibility is not only national but should be shared by the whole education community."
 
   The Brazilian education minister, Paulo Renato Souza, said that in a globalised inter-dependent world, "educational responsibility is not only national but should be shared by the whole education community."
 
  This view was reiterated by Egypt’s education minister, Dr. Hussein Kamel Bahaa El Din. Speaking on behalf of 20 other Arab education ministers, he said: "Knowledge is the capital of the new century," and societies could not limit themselves to elementary skills in an intensive, knowledge-based world.
 
  Ministers were candid about the gains and shortcomings of the EFA processes in their countries. Bangladesh’s education minister, Abu Sharaf Hifzul Kader Sadique, reported significant advances in literacy, but confessed to difficulties in quality. "In our rush for numbers (after Jomtien), quality missed out." This assessment was echoed by China, which has otherwise made remarkable advances. "The overall quality of school teachers leaves much to be desired," said Lu Fuyuan, deputy education minister. The large part of China’s population that lives in remote, mountainous areas was still difficult to reach, and while enrollment was high, there was a shortage of teachers and buildings.
 
  Indonesia's economic and political crisis has affected education. A drop in purchasing power has resulted in a fall in enrollment and a rise in pupils dropping out of school. Education Minister Yahya A. Muhaimin said the country was now engaged in a massive social ‘safety net’ programme to check the impact of the crisis.
 
  The EFA Forum is sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Bank, as well as several bilateral donor agencies.
 
[ Discussion Forum | Contact | Site map | Search this site | top ]