ICH Safeguarding in the Pacific

Sing Sing Wabag Enga(c)Wikicommons

Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) and Sustainable Development

The Pacific region has a wealth of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) in the domains of oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals and festivities, knowledge of nature and the universe and traditional craftsmanship. Since 2007, UNESCO in Apia organised several regional and national meetings to enhance awareness of ICH safeguarding and its contribution to sustainable development in the Pacific.  The meetings were held in Fiji (regional in 2007 and national in 2008), PNG (2008), Tonga (national in 2008) and Vanuatu (national in 2009).

National Strategy, Capacity Building and Networking for ICH Safeguarding

Building on the above, assistance was provided to support multi-stakeholder consultation that brought together stakeholders involved in ICH safeguarding including ICH custodians, traditional leaders, NGOs, researchers and academics as well as national authorities concerned so as to discuss a national strategy for ICH safeguarding, learn the principles of the ICH Convention, and have a better understanding of the implications and benefits of the ratification of the 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. Such consultations were held in Palau (Feb 2010), Samoa (May 2010), the Cook Islands (June 2010) and the Solomon Islands (Oct 2010), Kiribati (Feb 2011), Nauru (May 2011) and  the Republic of the Marshall Islands (June 2011). 

Since January 2012, within the framework of Japan Funds-in-Trust project "Safeguarding ICH through the Strengthening of National Capacities in Asia and the Pacific", the following workshops were held; ICH Ratification Workshop (Apia, Feb 2012), ICH Implementation Workshop (Apia, Feb 2013), ICH Implementation Workshop (Port Moresby, May 2012), ICH Inventorying Workshop (Goroka, Oct 2012).  UNESCO also sent policy support mission to assist states parties to develop a national ICH strategy for the implementation of the ICH Convention.

Capacity building activities were organised in partnership with CRIHAP, Category II Centre in China (Beijing, Dec 2012) (Chengdu, July 2013) (Sydney, October 2015). 

The Use of ICH in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development includes a goal relating to education (SDG 4), ie. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all, which also includes the appreciation of cultural diversity.  UNESCO advocates for the use of ICH in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), and provided its technical assistance for Palau that took part in the regional project funded under UNESCO/Japanese Funds-in-Trust.  Under this project, Palau has produced ICH materials, developed lesson plans and piloted them in classrooms.

Regional Cooperation in the Pacific

One of the outcome of the regional cooperation is ICHCAP Publication "Traditional Knowledge and Wisdom: Themes from the Pacific Islands".  This Publication contains inspiring articles mainly by Pacific authors.  Several book launching events were held in the Pacific island states in order to further raise awareness of the important contribution of ICH to the well-being of communities.

International Cooperation

The following two ICH elements, which were former Masterpieces, are now integrated in the ICH Representative List established by the ICH Convention;

The Lakalaka, Dances and Sung Speeches of Tonga

Vanuatu Sand Drawings

 

ICH Inventorying Questionnaire

1. IDENTIFICATION OF THE ICH ELEMENT

1.1. Name of the element, as used by the community concerned

1.2. Short, informative title of the element (including indication of the ICH domain(s) concerned)

1.3. Community(ies) concerned

1.4. Physical location(s)/distribution frequency of enactment of the element

1..5 Short description of the element 

2. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ICH ELEMENT

2.1. Practitioner(s)/performer(s) directly involved in the enactment or practice of the element (including name, age, gender, professional category, etc.)

2.2. Other people in the community who are less directly involved, but who contribute to the practice of the element or facilitate its practice or transmission (e.g. preparing stages, costumes, training supervising, sponsoring)

2.3. Language(s) or language register(s) involved

2.4. Tangible elements (such as instruments, specific clothing or space(s), ritual objects) (if any) associated with the enactment or transmission of the element

2.5. Other intangible elements (if any) associated with the enactment or transmission of the element

2.6. Customary practices (if any) governing access to the element or to aspects of it

2.7. Modes of transmission to others in the community

2.8. Relevant organisations (community organisations, NGOs or others - if any)

3. STATE OF THE ICH ELEMENT: VIABILITY

3.1. Threats (if any) to the continued enactment and transmission of the element within the relevant community(ies)

3.2. Threats to the sustainability of access to tangible elements and resources (if any) associated with the element

3.3. Viability of other intangible heritage elements (if any) associated with the element

3.4. Safeguarding or other measures in place (if any) to address any of these threats and encourage future enactment and transmission of the element

4. DATA RESTRICTIONS AND PERMISSIONS

4.1. Consent from, and involvement of, the community(ies) concerned in the process of collecting information

4.2. Restrictions, if any, on the use of (or access to) information

4.3. Resource person(s): name and status or affiliation

4.4. Date(s) and place(s) of information generated

5. REFERENCES CONCERNING THE ICH ELEMENT (IF ANY)

5.1. Literature (if any)

5.2. Audiovisual materials, recordings, etc. in archives, museums and private collections (if any)

5.3. Documentary material and objects in archives, museums and private collections (if any)

6. INVENTORYING DATA

6.1. Person(s) who compiled the inventory entry

6.2. Proof of consent of the community(ies) concerned for: 9a) inventorying the element; and (b) the information to be provided in the inventory

6.3. Date of entering the information in the inventory

 

Free Prior Informed Consent Form

Consent Form A: Fieldwork for Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) Community-based Inventorying

 

We, names                                      , representatives of             village, hereby give consent to the Ministry of                     on date             , to undertake a fieldwork within the framework of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) inventorying in name of the country.

Name

Title

Signature


 

 

Name

Title

Signature

 

 

 

Name

Title

Signature

 

Representative, Ministry of 

 

By signing the Free Prior Consent Form, you are giving permission to the Ministry of _______ to conduct research in your respective village for purposes of documentation of your tangible and intangible cultural resources for safeguarding and protection (Attached is the Terms of Reference in relation to the fieldwork).

The Ministry of _______ will restrict access of your information to anyone unless consent is given by the respective owner or holder of tangible and intangible heritage from your village.

 

Consent Form B: Free Prior and Informed Consent Form for Individual 

I, ____________, of _________village, hereby give consent to participate in the interview that will be conducted by a represensive of the Ministry of _________ on date   , during the fieldwork within the framework of the Intangible Cultural Heritage Community-based Inventorying (Attached is the Terms of Reference in relation to the fieldwork).

By signing the Free Prior and Informed Consent Form, I am giving permission to the Ministry of ______ to collect, in the form of audio/video recording, the information disclosed during the fieldwork which will take place in my village, for the purposes of documenting tangible and intangible cultural resources regarding;

□ Oral traditions and expressions

□ Performing arts

□ Social practices, rituals and festive events

□ knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe

□ traditional craftsmanship

For safeguarding and protection of cultural heritage in (name of the country).

Consent Form C: Before Interview

The Ministry of _______ will restrict access of your information to anyone, unless consent is given by the respective holder of the tangible and intangible culture and resources from your particular area.

By signing this form, you are giving your consent to the questionnaire attached.

You are entitled to decide not to disclose any information you wish to be kept confidential.

DISCLAIMER:

The Ministry _____ will not be liable for any damages to people and/or properties that may occur during the course of the fieldwork.

 

Date: _______                                                                     Place: _______

 

Name

Title

Signature


 

 

Name

Title

Signature

 

 

 

Name

Title

Signature


Representative, Ministry of 

 


Consent Form D: After Interview – Validation of Information Recorded during Fieldwork

 I, ____________, of _________village, hereby declare that the content of the information recorded on date       , at place        , is true and in accordance with the facts that I expressed in the course of the interview.

 

Name

Title

Signature


 

 

Name

Title

Signature

 

 

 

Name

Title

Signature


Representative, Ministry of 

 

 


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