Monitoring

The realization of the right to education is dependant upon its effective implementation. Obligations and political commitments under international instruments must be reflected in constitutions and national legislation and be further translated into policies and programmes. Member States have the obligation to report on measures they take for implementing standard-setting instruments.

UNESCO Instruments

Mobile school in Ethiopia

© UNESCO/Katy Anis
Mobile school in Ethiopia

UNESCO monitors the implementation of its standard-setting instruments in order to bring them into broader use, with support of Member States as prime movers, international organizations, decision-makers, teachers, the intellectual community and all civil society stakeholders.

Examination of periodic reports: UNESCO’s Constitution provides that “Each Member State shall submit to the Organization, at such time and in such manner as shall be determined by the General Conference, reports on laws, regulations and statistics relating to its educational, scientific and cultural institutions and activities, and on the action taken upon the recommendations and conventions (….)” (Articles VI (4) and VIII).

The periodic reports submitted by States have the effect of informing the Organization and all the States of the international community of the measures they have taken to fulfil their obligations under the instruments.  More information

 

UN Instruments

Most United Nations bodies concerned with human rights provide for continuing supervision of the realization of international human rights standards under a system of periodic review of information including reports from Member States, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, and communications alleging violations of human rights and thus the right to education.

As regards monitoring the implementation of the United Nations conventions on human rights, the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) as a treaty body, monitors the implementation of the right to education as provided for in Articles 13 and 14 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Every five years, each state party to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights is obliged to submit a report to the Committee. These reports cover all the rights in the Covenant and explain what the state is doing to implement the right to education (articles 13 and 14 of the International Covenant).

Other United Nations treaty bodies whose work relates to monitoring the right to education are: the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) which monitors this right as provided for in Articles 28 to 30 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989); and the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, which monitors this right as provided for in Article 10 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979). 

Website of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights  

Collaboration between UNESCO and the UN

'Symbolic Globe' by Erik Reitzel, UNESCO Headquarters

©UNESCO/Burke, Niamh
'Symbolic Globe' by Erik Reitzel, UNESCO Headquarters

UNESCO has the principal role and responsibility in the field of the right to education in the United Nations system.

The United Nations treaty bodies monitor the implementation of the United Nations human rights treaties and conventions. UNESCO’s cooperation with them centers on the right to education

UN - Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

International Labour Organisation

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