Cultural Diversity & Intercultural Dialogue

The UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (2005) is an international standard setting instrument providing a framework for the governance of culture that is based on fundamental principles of freedom of expression, gender equality, openness and balance to other cultures and expressions of the world and on the complementary economic and cultural aspects of sustainable development as defined in Part 1 (“Objectives and guiding principles”) of the Convention. The most recent UNESCO Convention in the field of culture and ratified by 135 Parties to date, it encourages governments to introduce policies for culture within a global context and commitment to protect and promote the diversity of cultural expressions.

The Office prioritises  protecting and promoting the diversity of cultural expressions through the implementation of the 2005 Convention and the development of cultural and creative industries. The 2005 Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions constitutes a standard-setting instrument in support of cultural diversity as conveyed by cultural activities, goods and services.

Current situation of the Convention ratification in the region:

 

COUNTRY

2005 CONVENTION

BOTSWANA

N

LESOTHO

18/02/2010

ACC

MALAWI

16/03/2010

ACC

MOZAMBIQUE

18/10/2007

R

NAMIBIA

29/11/2006

R

SOUTH AFRICA

21/12/2006

R

SWAZILAND

30/10/2012

A

ZAMBIA

N

ZIMBABWE

15/05/2008

R

In 2016 and 2017, the Regional Office for Southern Africa will support capacity development in three key areas of the 2005 Convention implementation:

  • quadrennial reports quality and quantity; Only one report has been received from the Southern African States parties -  Namibia in 2012. 
  • Quality and quantity of the IFCD requests;
  • Support to the countries preparing the ratification process.

 

Current major activity: 

The on-going SIDA financed project on the capacity-building on periodic reporting for the 2005 Convention  in Zimbabwe will greatly facilitate this process.

The experience acquired in this segment will therefore be extended to the country level among the other countries depending on their next quadrennial reporting schedule.

Follow this link for more information.

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