» Bringing the UN Decade of Ocean Science to Capitol Hill
15.06.2018 - Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

Bringing the UN Decade of Ocean Science to Capitol Hill

© Christine I. Caly-Sanchez - From left to right: Peter Heffernan, Craig McLean, Volker Rieke, Sigi Gruber, Minh-Hà Pham, Wojciech Wawrzynski, Nancy Knowlton, Lisa Levin, Mary Kavanagh, Mark Brownlow, Vladimir Ryabinin, John White and Jan-Stefan Fritz

IOC Executive Secretary Dr Vladimir Ryabinin advocates for the UN Decade of Ocean Science to act as a vector of greater transatlantic ocean research cooperation, during the Capitol Hill Ocean Week in Washington D.C.

Attending the Capitol Hill Ocean Week in Washington D.C., on 6 June 2018, the Executive Secretary of UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), Dr Vladimir Ryabinin, spoke at a celebratory event entitled “Transatlantic Research Cooperation to Treasure and Protect the Atlantic Ocean,” held in the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Celebrating 20 years of the EU-US Science and Technology Agreement and 5 years of EU-US marine research cooperation, the event brought together European and U.S. representatives of industry, science and policy to identify the best ways for science to help treasure and protect the Atlantic Ocean, keeping it healthy, productive and safe from plastic pollution.

More than 100 people attended the event to listen to distinguished and prestigious panelists committed to this cause, and to know about the vision and achievements of the Galway Statement and the future of EU-US cooperation in the field.

Invited to comment on the transatlantic scientific priorities over the next 10 years, Dr Ryabinin evoked the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development as a potential frame to strengthen and mainstream transatlantic cooperation around ocean research, protection and sustainable use.

“We have to develop science and use it to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals,” he said.

He stressed that ocean mapping, observations and predictions are essential. “We need to go deeper and we need to be able to predict the health of the ocean, and this can be difficult; our knowledge of the deep ocean ecosystem and its functioning is still very limited. There are strong intellectual and technical challenges to overcome, but it is exciting.”

Set to go from 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2018, the UN Decade of Ocean Science is currently undergoing a preparatory period under the auspices and coordination of UNESCO’s IOC.

Read a detailed account of the “Transatlantic Research Cooperation to Treasure and Protect the Atlantic Ocean” event here.

For further information, please contact:

ioc.communication(at)unesco.org




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