21.06.2013 - UNESCOPRESS

Hill Forts of Rajasthan and Wooden Churches of the Carpathian region inscribed on World Heritage List

© DRONAHHill Forts of Rajasthan (India)

Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 21 June—The World Heritage Committee today inscribed two new cultural World Heritage sites, one in India and the other on the border of Poland and Ukraine.

Hill Forts of Rajasthan, (India)

The serial site, situated in the state of Rajasthan, includes six majestic forts in Chittorgarh; Kumbhalgarh; Sawai Madhopur; Jhalawar; Jaipur, and Jaisalmer. The ecclectic architecture of the forts, some up to 20 kilometres in circumference, bears testimony to the power of the Rajput princely states that flourished in the region from the 8th to the 18th centuries. Enclosed within defensive walls are major urban centres, palaces, trading centres and other buildings, including temples that often predate the fortifications within which developed an elaborate courtly culture that supported learning, music and the arts. Some of these urban centres have survived, as have many of the site's temples and other sacred buildings. The forts use the natural defenses offered by the landscape: hills, deserts, rivers, and dense forests. They also feature extensive water harvesting structures, largely still in use today.


Wooden Tserkvas of the Carpathian Region in Poland and Ukraine

Situated on the eastern fringe of eastern Europe, this transnational property includes a selection of 16 tserkvas - churches, built of horizontal wooden logs between the 16th and 19th centuries by communities of the Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholic faiths. They represent the cultural expression of four ethnographic groups and the formal, decorative and technical characteristics they developed over time. The tserkvas bear testimony to a distinct building tradition rooted in Orthodox ecclesiastic design, interwoven with elements of local tradition, and symbolic references to their communities’ cosmogony. The tserkvas are built on a tri-partite plan surmounted by open quadrilateral or octagonal domes and cupolas. They feature wooden bell towers, iconostasis screens, and interior polychrome decorations as well as churchyards, gatehouses and graveyards.


Additions to the World Heritage List are expected to continue tomorrow, as the World Heritage Committee pursues its work. The 37th session, taking place in Phnom Penh, will close in Angkor on 27 June.




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