Ngaremeduu

The Ngaremeduu Bay Region lies on the west coast of the Babeldaob Island, the largest island of Palau, located in the South Pacific. The Biosphere Reserve corresponds to the Ngaremeduu Conservation Area: it incorporates the largest estuary in Micronesia, freshwater marshes, Pandanus/grass and shrub savanna, one of the largest stretches of mangroves on the small Pacific islands, as well as extensive coral reefs and seagrass beds.

Declaration Date: 2005
Surface Area: 13,674 ha
Administrative Division: Conservation Area Coordinating Committee (CACC) - decision-making body MCPA Programme (technical and financial support) reporting to the Ministry of Resources and Development the three State Governments of Aimeliik, Ngatpang and Ngaremlengui.

Ecological Characteristics

The Ngaremeduu Bay Region lies on the west coast of Babeldaob Island, the largest island of Palau, located in the South Pacific.

The Biosphere Reserve corresponds to the Ngaremeduu Conservation Area: it incorporates the largest estuary in Micronesia, freshwater marshes, Pandanus/grass and shrub savannah, one of the largest stretches of mangroves on the small Pacific islands, as well as extensive coral reefs and sea-grass beds.

The area is one of the richest in biodiversity in Micronesia, with a range of both marine and terrestrial species. There are approximately 220 species of stony corals in the reef habitats and the total number of corals can exceed 100 species per site when combined with soft corals.

The stretches of mangroves include44% of Palau’s mangrove forest and comprise 18 different mangrove species.

Ngaremeduu Bay is also known to provide habitat for several endangered and threatened species such as the dugong, salt-water crocodile, and sea turtles.

Human Activities

Since the core areas and buffer zones are mostly marine areas, there are only some 60 people living in the Biosphere Reserve and most of the Palauans in the villages still depend on subsistence fisheries and farming.

It is estimated that there are over 80 cultural and historical sites within or around the Biosphere Reserve. These include traditional villages consisting of stone platforms, stone paths, monoliths, burials, stone piles and docks.

Conservation of these sites is important since they can be used to attract tourists aspart of an income-generating project.

Other income generating projects include aquaculture with the construction of milkfish ponds, and ecotourism with adventure kayak tours, nature trails and visits of historical culture sites.

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