Vallee du Fango

Located in the north-west of Corsica, this biosphere reserve follows the limits of the Fango Valley watershed. The Fango River is a mountain torrent that flows into the Gulf of Galéria in Corsica. The biosphere reserve rises from the level of the Mediterranean sea up to an altitude of 2,556 meters above sea level.

Declaration Date: 1977
Surface Area: 23,500 ha
Administrative Division: Parc National Régional de Corse (Charte du PNRC) + Comité d'aide a la gestion (3 communes, ONF, Association APEEM)

Human Activities

Human activity is modest with 435 inhabitants scattered through the various hamlets of the communities of Galéria, Manso and Calenzana (1990). The economy is mainly based on livestock and tourism (12,000 visitors in the 1992 season) and is concentrated on the coast and the banks of the Fango.

The management of scarce freshwater resources in the area is one of the main challenges in the biosphere reserve. The ‘Casa Marina’ is used since 1994 to house various environmental education activities. Research has been carried out since 1970 on biological and socioeconomic issues.  

Ecological Characteristics

Located in the north-west of Corsica, this biosphere reserve follows the limits of the Fango Valley watershed. The Fango River is a mountain torrent that flows into the Gulf of Galéria in Corsica.

The biosphere reserve rises from the level of the Mediterranean sea up to an altitude of 2,556 meters above sea level. The different altitude zones are clearly represented in the strongly characteristic Mediterranean- type valley with evergreen broadleaf forest and Mediterranean maquis.

The mouth of the Fango River is a biologically rich mosaic noted particularly for its bird life, amphibians and reptiles. The holm oak groves of the Fango are ancient stands where the evergreen oak still dominate. The steep rocky landscapes of the high valley are home to the Corsican mouflon, the bearded vulture or lamergeier and the golden eagle


> Back to Biosphere Reserves in France

                                                                                    Last updated: March 2013

Back to top