Energy Resources

Extract from the Mauritius Strategy (Chapter VII, Paras 46-49)

46. Energy dependence is a major source of economic vulnerability for many small island developing States, and many remote and rural small island developing States communities have little or no access to modern and affordable energy services. Modern research has produced commercially feasible options of energy supply, such as wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, hydro and ocean energy. Indeed, many small island developing States are particularly suited to these options because of their geographical location. However, existing technologies may not always be adaptable to the needs and circumstances of many Small Island developing States communities.

47. Small island developing States are committed, with the necessary support of the international community, to develop and implement integrated energy programmes. These programmes should include, inter alia, comprehensive assessments of energy resources, current and projected patterns of energy use, and ways to enhance energy efficiency in Small Island developing States, and promote the development and use of renewable energy as well as advanced clean energy technologies that are affordable and readily adaptable to the circumstances of Small Island developing States. Regional development banks have an important role in this process. Supports for technology transfer on mutually agreed terms and for capacity building are important.

48. Small island developing States are committed, with the required support of the international community, to strengthening ongoing and supporting new efforts in the area of energy supply and services, including the promotion of demonstration projects. It is recognized that a renewed effort is required by all for Small Island developing States to achieve real and demonstrable progress in this area by the time of its review by the Commission on Sustainable Development in 2006, in accordance with its work programme.

49. Small Island developing States and other international partners should work together to promote wider dissemination and application of technology that is appropriate to Small Island developing States and to strengthen existing mechanisms, such as the United Nations renewable energy fund and the United Nations Development Programme thematic trust fund on energy for sustainable development, for this purpose. Cooperation among Small Island developing States should be further pursued in areas where success has been achieved, such as a collaborative agency for financing renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in Small Island developing States.

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