Securitisation and Domestication of Diaspora Muslims and Islam: Turkish Immigrants in Germany and Australia

Michael Humphrey

Read this article [PDF, 3 MB]

This paper explores the securitisation and domestication of Muslims and Islam in Germany and Australia by looking at the case of Turkish Muslim immigrants. Securitisation and domestication of Muslims and Islam are an expression of transnational governmentality, the disciplining and management of a social category beyond state borders. They have been increasingly constituted as a homogenised transnational object through the harmonising of public policy and law and through the creation of a Western public sphere produced by spectator-citizens witnessing mediated risk events. The Turkish Muslim immigrant case reveals that while securitisation and domestication positions them as "threats" the Turkish state's role in managing diaspora Islam has positioned them as "moderate" Muslims. In both Germany and Australia, the Turkish state, through the Presidency of Religious Affairs (Diyanet) remains directly involved in providing clerics, supporting mosque building and religious education. In the politics of the domestication of Islam, the Muslim immigrants from Turkey and Turkish Islam have been put forward as a model of secularised "moderate" Islam and antidote to "extremists".

Suggested bibliographic reference for this article:

Humphrey, Michael. Securitisation and Domestication of Diaspora Muslims and Islam: Turkish immigrants in Germany and Australia. IJMS: International Journal on Multicultural Societies. 2009, vol.11, no.2, pp. 136-154, UNESCO. ISSN 1817-4574. www.unesco.org/shs/ijms/vol11/issue2/art2

About the author:

Michael Humphrey holds the chair in sociology at the University of Sydney (Australia). He has published widely on the themes of Islam in the West, Lebanese emigration, the anthropology of globalisation, political violence and terrorism, human rights politics and reconciliation. A major theme in his work has been the relationship between the individual, collectivities and the state. His main publications are Islam, Multiculturalism & Transnationalism: From the Lebanese Diaspora (IB Tauris 1998) and The Politics of Atrocity and Reconciliation: From Terror to Trauma (Routledge 2002). E-mail: michael.humphrey(at)sydney.edu.au

Back to top