Statistics on Radio

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  • Radio reaches over 95% of virtually every segment of the population.
    >> Source: ITU Document
  • If satellites are taken into account, then practically the whole world is covered by broadcasting. For example, the WorldSpace system covers most of the world (except North America and Australia) with radio service through three geostationary satellites. The beam of its AfriStar satellite, launched in 1998, covers all of Africa and has 59 channels.
    >> Source: ITU Document
  • In the developing world, recent data on the proportion of households with a radio show that, in the majority of countries, more than 75 per cent of households have a radio.
    >> Source: ITU Document
  • Half a million more people tuned in during the second quarter of 2010 compared with 2009, according to figures showing that 46.8m or nine out of 10 accessed the medium at least once a week in UK.
    >> Source: Tim Bradshw,  Radio Listening Highest for the decade, August 2010, Financial Times
  • An explosion in the number of radio stations, particularly those broadcasting in local languages. These are known in East Africa as the "vernaculars". The most vivid example of this trend is Uganda where there are now over 150 radio stations, 69% of which cater for audiences in the 38 different languages of the country.
    >> Source: African Media Development Initiative (AMDI) Research Summary Report BBC: London
  • Local commercial radio grew in sub‐Saharan Africa by an average of 360 percent between 2000 and 2006 and that community radio had grown on average by a striking 1,386 percent over the same period.
    >> Source: African Media Development Initiative (AMDI) Research Summary Report BBC: London
  • For example, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) there are now over 150 community radio stations when there were only ten in the year 2000
    >> Source: African Media Development Initiative (AMDI) Research Summary Report BBC: London
  • In Africa in general between 80% and 90% of households have access to a working radio set.
    >> Source: African Media Development Initiative (AMDI) Research Summary Report BBC: London
  • In Peru, there are as many as 1,691 FM stations, and 75% percent of urban Peruvians listen to the radio daily and 92 percent listen to it at least once a week
    >> Source: Intermedia, 2010: Peru Audience Scapes website
  • In Pakistan in the rural areas of the Baluchistan province, 46 percent of respondents said they listen to the radio at least weekly, rivalling rural television viewership at 47 percent >> Source: Intermedia, 2010: Pakistan Audience Scapes website
  • Internet radio's listener base has grown 27% annually since 2000. Online radio now has upwards of 80 million listeners in the U.S. alone.
    >> Source: JP Morgan Survey 2010
  • UK: 46.8m people listen to the radio at least once a week, or nine out of 10 people.
    >> Source: Financial Times 2010
  • On the listeners' side, radio is increasingly being accessed on mobile phones: for example, in Pakistan 30% of male listeners surveyed in 2008 said they had listened to radio via their phones.
    >> Source: Intermedia, 2010: Pakistan Audience Scapes website
  • Small battery‐operated transistors often costing no more than $10 US dollars.
  • It is now possible to set up a small 40 watt FM station for under $4,000-5000 US dollars.
    >> Source: UNESCO supported Radio-in-a-Box and others like Radio-in-suitcases
  • There are initiatives to reduce the operating cost of a radio to near zero through devices that do not require batteries. According to Freeplay, manufacturer of a wind-up radio, people in LDCs spend on average six per cent of their income on batteries (USD 24/year).14 Freeplay has distributed over 400 000 batteryless radios to some 40 developing countries since 2003, directly benefiting more than six million people.
    >> Source: ITU Document
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