Copyright 2006 - UNESCO

Space for Heritage

 

Satellites are also following the FIFA World Cup South Africa 2010!

Soccer City Stadium. Johannesburg, South Africa
© Spot Image
The French space agency (CNES), a UNESCO space partner of the ‘Open Initiative’, acquired 10 satellite images of the 2010 football World Cup stadiums in South Africa using the Korean satellite KOMPSAT-2.

The French Space Agency (CNES), a UNESCO space partner from the ‘Open Initiative on the use of space technologies to support the World Heritage Convention’, acquired 10 satellite images of the 2010 football World Cup stadiums in South Africa using the Korean satellite KOMPSAT-2 .

We support this idea of gather and process all these satellite images as a proof of the uses of space for the people. By looking at these ten stadiums seen by satellite, the general public can better understand the high-precision of a satellite’s potential (one-metre-resolution).
KOMPSAT-2 satellite
© Spot Image
The images were taken by the Korean satellite KOMPSAT-2, which flies in orbit around the earth at an altitude of 685 kilometres, but what does 685 km mean?

685 kilometers distance mean...

It is more or less the distance from Paris to Munich. So you can imagine that you are visiting the city of Munich, you are carrying an extremely sophisticated digital-camera called ‘Satellite Kompsat-2’ , you point your camera to Paris, which is located 686 kilometres (direct flight distance) far from you and you obtain a satellite image with the enormous high-definition as the ones shown herein. Obviously the human eyes cannot see anything at distance of 685 kilometres, but satellites certainly can!

Enjoy the World Cup stadiums courtesy of CNES copyright and remember, play fair!

See the 10 satellite images of the 2010 football World Cup stadiums