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PROGRAMME

DAY 3 - MONDAY 28 JUNE 1999


FORUM II - SCIENCE IN SOCIETY

MORNING

9.30 - 12.30 Plenary Session [with 30-min. presentations]

1. PUBLIC PERCEPTION OF SCIENCE: BETWEEN ACCEPTANCE AND REJECTION
Negative public perceptions of science and anti-science movements. Concepts such as the 'techno-science', held responsible for some of the environmental, technological and industrial hazards of modernity. What are the factors which motivate the rejection of science? The real problems versus unfounded accusations? How to address the former and dispel the latter, to foster the acceptance of science?
John Durant
Professor of the Public Understanding of Science, Imperial COllege, London, UK

2. SCIENCE FOR DEVELOPMENT
How to foster science and build endogenous scientific capacities in developing countries? Science and technology for socio-economic development and poverty elimination. Countering the growing North-South gap in science. Different North-South perceptions on the opportunities of science.
Shem O. Wandiga
Chairman, Kenya National Academy of Sciences, Kenya

3. SETTING PRIORITIES IN A NEW SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT
How to manage scientific activities and science policies in the new socio-economic, market-oriented, rapidly-changing global context? Issue of open science; analysing the trend towards significant restrictions on the disclosure and the distribution of knowledge. How to deal with the increasing commercialisation of scientific knowledge. Short- versus long-term goals in a policy context which favours short-term benefits. Need for developing new approaches for choosing priorities.
Partha Dasgupta
Faculty of Economics and Politics, Unviersity of Cambridge, UK

4. SCIENCE: THE GENDER ISSUE
How to achieve gender equality: - in the access to scientific and technological knowledge - in equal access to education, professional careers and decision-making in science and technology - in the establishment of research priorities. How to take into account the needs and aspirations of women in priority setting in scientific research and in developing new technologies.
Lydia Makhubu
President, Third World Organization for Women in Science

5. A NEW SOCIAL CONTRACT FOR SCIENCE
The challenges of environmental, public health, food security and poverty issues have produced a new socio-economic context for science. The need for a new social contract between science and society.
Jane Lubchenco
Professor of Zoology, Oregon State University, USA

6. SCIENCE FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS
Responsibilities of the present generation towards future generations. The involvement of young people in this process. Science for sustainable development. How scientists must share with decision-makers the responsibility for scientifically sound long-term risk assessment and management of environmental, technological and socio-economic transformations. How to improve long-term scientific prediction and address uncertainty. How to encourage innovative thinking.
Lu Yongxiang
President, Chinese Academy of Sciences

AFTERNOON

14.30 - 17.30

Concurrent thematic meetings

1. PUBLIC PERCEPTION OF SCIENCE: BETWEEN ACCEPTANCE AND REJECTION
Development of morning presentation

2. SCIENCE FOR DEVELOPMENT
Development of morning presentation.

3. SETTING PRIORITIES IN A NEW SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT
Development of morning presentation.

4. SCIENCE: THE GENDER ISSUE
Development of morning presentation.

5. A NEW SOCIAL CONTRACT FOR SCIENCE
Development of morning presentation.

6. SCIENCE, INDUSTRY AND KNOWLEDGE AS PUBLIC GOOD
Challenges and consequences of the effort to move basic scientific research closer to the market. The need for maintaining a balance and strong connections between science and industry. Comparisons of national experiences. Implication of globalization.

7. NEW MECHANISMS FOR FUNDING SCIENCE
Increasing private funding (business, foundations, charities) and decreasing public funding. How to re-define a rationale for public support? Funding for international science.

8. SCIENTIFIC EXPERTISE AND COMPLEX DECISION-MAKING
How to organize more relevant scientific expertise, in a context of inherent risks and uncertainties. Expertise in governance. Relations between science and the powers (political, environmental, strategic); science, diplomacy and international negotiations.

9. JOINING FORCES FOR A SUSTAINABLE WORLD
The challenge of researching the interaction between natural and socio-economic systems. Research on sustainability in terms of environment and sustainable development including food security, public health, urbanization and poverty. The need to develop problem-oriented interdisciplinary research between natural, social and economic sciences. Research agendas to be planned with political and economic decision-makers.

10. SCIENCE AND DEMOCRACY
The public debate and citizens' participation in policy choices, in establishing major policy priorities (in areas such as the environment, energy, health), and on science-society linkages. How to foster democratic debate while maintaining the autonomy of science.

11. COMMUNICATING AND POPULARIZING SCIENCE
The communication of scientific knowledge in society. The role of the media.

12. SCIENCE AND OTHER FORMS OF KNOWLEDGE
The cultural context of science. Different approaches to understanding and explaining the world. Traditional, empirical methods and tools in medicine and environment; recognition and validation of the contributions of traditional knowledge; career opportunities for endogenous knowledge producers.

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