"Each part of the world recapitulates, shares in and experiences the history of the world as a whole"
Fernand Braudel

Museu da Água – EPAL – Lisbon, Portugal

This museum is owned by EPAL, the company responsible for maintaining water supply to Lisbon. The museum consists of four different buildings and sites: the Barbadinhos Steam Pump Station (1880-1928); the two reservoirs Mãe d'Agua das Amoeiras (1746) and Patriarcal (1856-1940); and the Aguas Livres Aqueduct (1732, 1834-1960s). The aqueduct was planned under King João V (1689 – 1750) but was not completed until a century later. It still remains as a remarkable example of architectural engineering for its length (almost a kilometre) and especially for the heights of its thirty five arches. One of which is largest pointed stone arch in the world.

The Barbadinhos Steam Pump Station is still perfectly preserved. It houses four steam machines and five boilers which were used to increase the volume of water available for distribution. Both the reservoirs were constructed to receive and distribute the water collected by the aqueduct. In general, the museum focuses on a series of walks and visual experiences which bring the history of the water supply in Lisbon to life. While not being directly related to the heritage of water associated with Islam, the museum picks up on and enshrines the dialogue of a Mediterranean culture that developed an innovative approach to maintain water supply to its capital, Lisbon. Further, the museum won the Council of Europe Museum prize in 1990 for the contribution it makes maintaining the rich diversity of cultural dialogues that abound in Europe.

Photos © Museu da Água

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Gas Autoclave with Pressure Metre

Gas Autoclave with Pressure Metre


Calibrated Flow Measurement Box

Calibrated Flow Measurement Box