Record-keeping mechanisms exist in most countries

Appeals mechanism: Record-keeping mechanisms exist in most countries, but much needs to be done to keep the data updated for reporting purposes
Appeals
Last update: December 6, 2021
Key findings
Out of the 102 countries and territories
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only 57%
had data in 2020

on requests for information received (i.e 52 jurisdictions)

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48% of cases
(the majority) were granted

and only 15% were denied (among the 52 jurisdictions)

An appeal is an application for a decision (or lack of a decision), which normally involves a request to reconsider failures by duty-bearers to provide information. For the purpose of this survey, statistics on appeals do not include those that were decided by courts.

Out of the 102 countries and territories, only 57% (52) had data in 2020 on requests for information received. The remaining 43% (39) only had data from either 2018 or 2019, or no data at all. Of the latter, it is important to note that some did report having a data collection mechanism. The low figure in 2020 could be due to the COVID-19 context, where a number of countries temporarily suspended existing ATI guarantees, limiting the ATI oversight institutions in performing their duties.

From the data available in 2020 as reported by the 52 countries and territories, the majority of requests were granted (48% of cases) and only 15% were denied, with the rest being dismissed as ineligible (15%) and pending (22%). However, it is worth noting that some countries recorded gaps in terms of the number of total appeals received and their breakdowns based on UNESCO’s categories of decision. In this case, some countries and territories explained that the cases that were treated in 2020 were actually pending cases carried over from the previous year(s). This resulted in differences between the total number of decisions made and the total number of appeals received.

Decisions taken on Appeals in 2020
Decisions taken on Appeals in 2020